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Old 04-21-2010, 03:20 AM
 
Location: Land of chicken fry & fried okra
21 posts, read 50,343 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Midwest is more of a historical term, it was applied to the states of the old northwest ordinance after the nation expanded west, making them no longer northwest but midwest. No doubt the midwest is not the same from one end to another. I live in Michigan and here as in Wi and MN you here the term upper midwest alot. Kansas like all other plains states has been added to the midwest as the nation expanded all the way to the Pacific. I think Kansas has elements of both midwest and west. Everytime I have ever been there, the state seems to become much more western in nature as you head toward Colorado. Like Ohio, and Missouri, Kansas seems to be influecned by two regions(midwest and west). If you go into the Ohio forum you will find the same debate about whether that state is northeastern or midwestern. Missouri debates between south and midwest. It is possible for a state to have elements of two regions inside the same state.
This man here, one of few folks to actually know what he's talking about
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Old 04-24-2010, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Garden City, KS
110 posts, read 162,715 times
Reputation: 61
How about we group Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas into the "Mid-South"? Each state seems to have the influence of South, Southwest, and Midwest culture (depending on the part of the state you are in). Kansas doesn't have much Southern influence, but has a little near the Oklahoma-Missouri area. As Texas only has Midwestern influence in the far northeastern areas, like Wichita Falls and the DFW Metroplex. Oklahoma has all three of these regional influences, with Tulsa being the meeting point of them.
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Old 04-24-2010, 01:45 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
4,237 posts, read 3,963,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankangel1111 View Post
How about we group Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas into the "Mid-South"? Each state seems to have the influence of South, Southwest, and Midwest culture (depending on the part of the state you are in). Kansas doesn't have much Southern influence, but has a little near the Oklahoma-Missouri area. As Texas only has Midwestern influence in the far northeastern areas, like Wichita Falls and the DFW Metroplex. Oklahoma has all three of these regional influences, with Tulsa being the meeting point of them.
Interesting perspective.

I do not think that Kansas shares enough cultural commonality with OK/TX to be grouped in with them. Another thing to recognize is that Kansas is above the Mason-Dixon, which is technically the cutoff. While there may be some Southern traits resident on Kansas' southern border, based on my experience (around 6-7 trips) in Kansas, I think KS has much more cultural affinity to Nebraska, Missouri, and Iowa. Also, I have heard Mid-South to describe Tennessee (and to a lesser extent Kentucky and Arkansas) so that regional moniker has already been utilized for other states somewhat.

Oklahoma and Texas obviously share the most commonality with each other, with a good portion of Arkansas exhibiting cultural/regional affinity, and to a lesser extent Louisiana. It is for this reason, in my opinion, that the Census groups TX/AR/LA/OK together in a subregion of the South called the West South Central.

Many of us Okies/Texans prefer South-Central (or Western-South as my good friend, TexReb likes to employ) as a regional designation as it highlights the obvious Southern culture resident in Oklahoma/Texas while clearly demonstrating a distinction with Deep South states such as Bammer, Mississippi, South Carolina, Georgia, etc.

With that said, I will say that Kansans are some of the nicest/laid back folk (which IS very similar to OK/TX) I've come into contact with around our great country. We just "tawk" a little different down here in these parts.

Anyhow, thanks for your insights and good dialogue.

Last edited by Bass&Catfish2008; 04-24-2010 at 01:54 PM..
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Old 04-24-2010, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Garden City, KS
110 posts, read 162,715 times
Reputation: 61
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass&Catfish2008 View Post
Interesting perspective.

I do not think that Kansas shares enough cultural commonality with OK/TX to be grouped in with them. Another thing to recognize is that Kansas is above the Mason-Dixon, which is technically the cutoff. While there may be some Southern traits resident on Kansas' southern border, based on my experience (around 6-7 trips) in Kansas, I think KS has much more cultural affinity to Nebraska, Missouri, and Iowa. Also, I have heard Mid-South to describe Tennessee (and to a lesser extent Kentucky and Arkansas) so that regional moniker has already been utilized for other states somewhat.

Oklahoma and Texas obviously share the most commonality with each other, with a good portion of Arkansas exhibiting cultural/regional affinity, and to a lesser extent Louisiana. It is for this reason, in my opinion, that the Census groups TX/AR/LA/OK together in a subregion of the South called the West South Central.

Many of us Okies/Texans prefer South-Central (or Western-South as my good friend, TexReb likes to employ) as a regional designation as it highlights the obvious Southern culture resident in Oklahoma/Texas while clearly demonstrating a distinction with Deep South states such as Bammer, Mississippi, South Carolina, Georgia, etc.

With that said, I will say that Kansans are some of the nicest/laid back folk (which IS very similar to OK/TX) I've come into contact with around our great country. We just "tawk" a little different down here in these parts.

Anyhow, thanks for your insights and good dialogue.
Thank you! What parts of KS have you been to?
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Old 04-24-2010, 08:35 PM
 
Location: OKIE-Ville
4,237 posts, read 3,963,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by frankangel1111 View Post
Thank you! What parts of KS have you been to?
From the towns/cities that I remember: Topeka, Wichita, Salina, the suburbs on the Kansas side of KC, Manhattan, etc.
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Old 04-25-2010, 11:01 AM
 
15 posts, read 18,382 times
Reputation: 24
Default Uhhhhh

Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
Kansas is mostly a plains state overall. It is far too arid to be considered Midwest in large sections of the state.
What does the humidity have to do with being classified as Midwest in geography? I've read a few of your gems here today you don't seem all that together upstairs am I wrong? Prove it by using what God gave ya when posting.
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Old 04-25-2010, 11:14 AM
 
Location: southwest Nebraska and northwest Kansas
2,148 posts, read 2,950,656 times
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Because "MidWest" is a region of higher rainfall that doesn't require irrigation in order to farm.
The western half of Kansas would not be able to farm to the extent that they do without center pivot irrigation.
Eastern KS might indeed be similar to the midwest, much like eastern Nebraska and even the eastern Dakotas.

But these four states as a whole would be considered "Plains."
The western halves just are not similar to the rest of the MidWest.
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Old 04-25-2010, 11:45 AM
 
15 posts, read 18,382 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by itsMeFred View Post
Because "MidWest" is a region of higher rainfall that doesn't require irrigation in order to farm.
The western half of Kansas would not be able to farm to the extent that they do without center pivot irrigation.
Eastern KS might indeed be similar to the midwest, much like eastern Nebraska and even the eastern Dakotas.

But these four states as a whole would be considered "Plains."
The western halves just are not similar to the rest of the MidWest.
Funny, because having grown up on a family farm in NW Kansas I can tell you that we did not irrigate, non of our neighbors irrigated, and we grew some of the highest yields in the whole country of hard red winter wheat.
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Old 04-25-2010, 12:21 PM
Status: "That 80s Sound, ZTT Records!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Madison, WI Metro Area
15,332 posts, read 21,205,375 times
Reputation: 7736
Quote:
Originally Posted by DenverfromHays View Post
What does the humidity have to do with being classified as Midwest in geography? I've read a few of your gems here today you don't seem all that together upstairs am I wrong? Prove it by using what God gave ya when posting.
I take it you have never lived in the Midwest core or eastern Midwest. States like Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota have next to nothing in common with western Kasnas. None of those states irrigates crops. Western Kansas irrigates a huge amount of cropland. If you really want to educate yourself go to googlemaps.com and look at all of the center pivots out there. The Midwest core (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana) primarily grow corn and soybeans with no irrigation with a heck of a lot less wheat.

If the Ogallala Aquifer is going to survive most of the acerage in western Kansas will have to be reverted to dryland agriculture.
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Old 04-25-2010, 01:35 PM
 
Location: southwest Nebraska and northwest Kansas
2,148 posts, read 2,950,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DenverfromHays View Post
Funny, because having grown up on a family farm in NW Kansas I can tell you that we did not irrigate, non of our neighbors irrigated, and we grew some of the highest yields in the whole country of hard red winter wheat.
Yep.
Perfect example.

Wheat is not really a midwestern crop. Soybeans and corn are.
(And both of the above are expanding into western Kansas because of the availability of center pivot irrigation.)



(Oops! I see I should have read the last post. Granite Stater already said this! lol)
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