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Old 03-24-2017, 04:10 PM
 
181 posts, read 134,351 times
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@futuremauian. Thanks!
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Old 03-24-2017, 05:16 PM
 
Location: SE Alaska
2,063 posts, read 968,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane M View Post
you tell me.
I don't know, hence the question.
My guess is that they have all of the above, but you mentioned Pahala as if it were missing one or more of the three, from researching areas to live.

Agreed that sea level Kona is too warm. I also find lower Puna to be that way much of the year.

As a running and hiking enthusiast, you'd love where I am now. Well, it might be a bit too cold and damp
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Old 03-25-2017, 08:13 PM
 
Location: San Diego
417 posts, read 384,273 times
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We left due to health reasons. My son was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis at 15 months and we were constantly traveling to Oahu or CA for medical treatment. He had swollen fingers and knees and was having difficulty walking. Then the doctor said the climate of Kauai (we were in Princeville) was too humid and we should try a new climate.

We looked on Craigslist to do a house/car swap and found someone in Del Mar, San Diego. We did a 6 month house swap and my sons swelling completely resolved on its own. Within about 3-4 months he was running and walking as normal. So it was really bitter sweet for us since we spent 6 years planning our Kauai move and only lived there 18 months.

Interestingly enough the couple who we did the house swap with ended up trying to buy our house there. It didn't work out sold to someone else but we remain friends with the couple.

No regrets. If we didn't move we would have regretted that for sure. My husband sometimes says he regrets the move to Kauai in hindsight since it did cost a lot with all the back and forth.
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Old 03-25-2017, 08:31 PM
 
Location: SE Alaska
2,063 posts, read 968,931 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scgali View Post
We left due to health reasons. My son was diagnosed with juvenile arthritis at 15 months and we were constantly traveling to Oahu or CA for medical treatment. He had swollen fingers and knees and was having difficulty walking. Then the doctor said the climate of Kauai (we were in Princeville) was too humid and we should try a new climate. ..
That's too bad. It could have been a toxic reaction to mold, more prevalent in humid climates.
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Old 04-01-2017, 12:46 AM
 
50 posts, read 47,601 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane M View Post
Let me give you a short background on where I have lived so you can see the perspective I am coming

2. Food. I knew it was going to be limited and expensive, but JESUS! I can't stand shopping here. And yes, I go to farmer's markets, but honestly, even some of the stuff there isn't that great. I haven't had a good pineapple since I've been here. People tell me to go to Costco, but I don't eat like that. Bagged salads, chicken breasts and loaves of white bread don't make me happy. I am used to diversity in cuisine. You don't have that here. What IS wonderful is the growing season, and I was able to order seeds (which is illegal, btw...didn't know until I received them, so DON"T DO IT!!) to grow what I wanted and I was successful. Hawaii is really a state where I would not rely on grocery stores or farmers markets to get what you need. It really is a state where the self reliant prosper. Grow your own crops, fish the ocean (in a boat of course), slaughter your own hogs and you'll eat well.
l.
Great post! Could you elaborate more on the seed story? Could you not find seeds locally? And how did you get in trouble? Id love to grow my own fruit & veg and assumed that since a major export of the islands are seeds, they wouldn't be difficult to find...

Is there no fishing off of piers or jettys?


If not chicken & bread from Costco, what do you preffer?


So, where are you moving to?
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Old 04-02-2017, 01:32 AM
 
181 posts, read 134,351 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CasualEntrepreneur View Post
Great post! Could you elaborate more on the seed story? Could you not find seeds locally? And how did you get in trouble? Id love to grow my own fruit & veg and assumed that since a major export of the islands are seeds, they wouldn't be difficult to find...

Is there no fishing off of piers or jettys?


If not chicken & bread from Costco, what do you preffer?


So, where are you moving to?
Yes, you can find seeds in Hawaii, but my boyfriend loves to conveniently buy stuff from the internet. We bought seeds from Vietnam for mostly asian vegetables such as: on choy, luffa, thai eggplant, winter melon, bitter melon and lemongrass (which we actually had a family member send to us and then we rooted it and grew a bunch). These vegetables are very difficult to find on the island. And I don't know how difficult the seeds are to find b/c I never looked for them here. They grow beautifully in this climate, and I am sure some families grow these plants, but you wont see them on the market. I believe that it is illegal to import seeds from foreign countries into US, and additionally into Hawaii. The department of agriculture can fine you. The receiver of illegal goods is always at fault even if the receiver did not request the goods. (e.g. a friend from a foreign country sends you a sausage which is not permitted under the DOA law...you are the one who is fined, not your friend).

Yes, you can fish from the land, but there are some restrictions. Additionally, you do have to be savvy about the fish you catch. Reef fish can and often do contain cigutera, so you have to know fish identity (which is not difficult to learn I suppose).

When in San Jose, my boyfriend and I shopped exclusively at Asian markets. My boyfriend and his family are from southeast asia and that is the type of food we prefer. Although in San Jose Iranian, Filipino, and Indian stores are abundant as well. It is absolutely mind blowing that in a state where most residence are Asian, it would be difficult to find Asian food, but it is not easy in the least bit and it is very very expensive when you do find it.

My boyfriend and I are currently in Portland, a city that consists of 94% white people, yet in SW Portland there are 4 large Asian supermarkets that are as good as the ones in San Jose (with an Asian population of 34%) and in downtown Portland there are a few more (that I have yet to discover). The food prices are much more reasonable here with much better selection.

The weather is cold right now, but it feels like a relief to me. I am able to get up and move without sweating my ass off. I am able to sleep or cook dinner without passing out from the heat. By late April it will be in the 70's and even if it stays in the 60's that will be good enough for me.
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Old 04-02-2017, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Kailua
8,385 posts, read 10,303,845 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jane M View Post

My boyfriend and I are currently in Portland, a city that consists of 94% white people, yet in SW Portland there are 4 large Asian supermarkets that are as good as the ones in San Jose (with an Asian population of 34%) and in downtown Portland there are a few more (that I have yet to discover). The food prices are much more reasonable here with much better selection.
While Portland is quite "White" it isn't anywhere near 94% White.

And us whities really like our Asian supermarkets and PF Changs.
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Old 04-02-2017, 10:10 AM
 
Location: SE Alaska
2,063 posts, read 968,931 times
Reputation: 1722
Quote:
Originally Posted by CasualEntrepreneur View Post
Great post! Could you elaborate more on the seed story? Could you not find seeds locally? And how did you get in trouble? Id love to grow my own fruit & veg and assumed that since a major export of the islands are seeds, they wouldn't be difficult to find...

Is there no fishing off of piers or jettys?


If not chicken & bread from Costco, what do you preffer?


So, where are you moving to?

In addition to the problems with fishing from shore that Jane mentioned, the pickings will be quite slim.

It's illegal to import plant material from abroad anywhere into US without having them inspected for pathogens and cleared from being potentially invasive plants. There are many local sources for vegetable and fruit seeds/starts.

I'm not familiar with Kauai, but on the Big Island the Hilo farmer's market would be the place to go if looking for uncommon vegetables used in Asian dishes. If the vendors don't sell them, they would probably be happy to help find them for you.

Dunno about Kona Costco, but I would imagine they have lots of good produce too, just like the one here in Alaska. Kona side has much less local farming going on, so their selection of Hawaiian grown produce will be limited.
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Old 04-02-2017, 12:14 PM
 
181 posts, read 134,351 times
Reputation: 244
@ Blind Cleric: Thank you for clarifying the fishing and seed issues. Also, you are correct about the markets in Hilo, they are much better than Kona side.
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Old 04-02-2017, 01:15 PM
 
181 posts, read 134,351 times
Reputation: 244
Quote:
Originally Posted by whtviper1 View Post
While Portland is quite "White" it isn't anywhere near 94% White.

And us whities really like our Asian supermarkets and PF Changs.
I apologize for misinformation. Portland is somewhere between 79-81% caucasian. However, it is also known as the "whitest (big) city in America."

Asians wish that white people would stay out of their supermarkets because it increases demand for certain items and hence raises the prices for the rest of us. I say this only half jokingly.
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