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Old 08-26-2007, 09:06 AM
 
Location: London, KY
718 posts, read 1,453,792 times
Reputation: 538

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Quote:
Originally Posted by K. Dunn View Post
Found this issue very interesting, and did some research about how many counties in Kentucky are still "Dry", really amazing. Sounds like someone is still living in the past! They have even proved with statistics how more "Dry" county residents get into alcohol related accidents than "Wet" county residents! Making people dry vast distances to get alcohol is crazy! If they want it, they will get it! Oh well what do you do. It does sound like there are less and less counties or cities each year, or have that silly "moist" designation to just confuse the issue more.

Now my questions for those who know regarding this issue.

#1) Can you buy out of state wine in a "Wet" county? The reason I ask this, because I read a article saying talking about the 2006 ruling that may kill the Wineries in Ky because of there inability to sell out of state/county/city, and how hard they made it for out of state wineries to sell in KY [practically impossible from the sound of it?]

#2] Can you travel with sealed alcohol through a "Dry" county? Example one went to another county that does sell alcohol. Purchased it, put it in the trunk, and brought it home, but your travels took you through or into a "Dry" state. This one makes me very curious.

#3] Is there really bootlegging still going on to this day?

Inquiring minds want to know. Plus if my in-laws end up moving over after us, being from England, they will really want to know! They know how to drink!! Hah.

Thanks in advance!
I can answer questions 2 & 3. There is no law prohibiting alcohol in a dry county, you just cannot sell/purchase alcohol in dry counties. Yes, there is definitely bootlegging still today. Quite a few people "in the know" could take you to a bootlegger. It's probably the worst kept secret as to who the county bootleggers are. I thought I would throw in another tidbit for you, there is also still moonshine that is produced in Eastern KY. Although it has been surpassed long ago by marijuana and meth, there is still "shine" being made in the hills.
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Old 08-26-2007, 06:16 PM
 
13 posts, read 45,085 times
Reputation: 14
Hello there folks. lol There is a town just out side of Somerset called Burnside. Not even a mile away that is wet. Only problem is that they are restaurants, but u can drink in there. U might be able to buy a case or something there dont know. No bars though just restaurants. They want to open a bar but we will have to see. Sorry for any miss spellings im tired and dont care. lol
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Old 12-19-2007, 04:01 PM
 
Location: Victoria, Canada
90 posts, read 316,262 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trudeyrose View Post
We are planning to retire to Kentucky, probably the lake cumberland area, and are just investigating the area via internet. If I understand right, Pulaski County and all the counties around it are dry. Where do people who live there go to buy beer and vodka? As far as I can figure out, Lebanon would be the closest, and that is 80 miles away. Any input would be appreciated.
Pulaski county has been dry for all my 59 yrs. However, I call it wet, because of all the boot leggers around. Burnside, just 7 0r 8 miles south is moist. They serve liquor with dinner at the restraunts. Burnside is a lovely little town also, and is where I plan to live when I return back there. When I lived there, most people went to Richmond, Ky (45 min away) and/or to the Tennessee line for purchasing their liquor. I feel, eventually somerset will go wet also.
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Old 12-19-2007, 05:08 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,451,669 times
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with the high price of gas, a bootlegger isn't a bad idea.
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Old 12-19-2007, 08:51 PM
 
Location: Victoria, Canada
90 posts, read 316,262 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
with the high price of gas, a bootlegger isn't a bad idea.
You can ask most hometown folks there and they can tell you where you can find a bootlegger. Good luck!
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Old 12-21-2007, 05:02 AM
 
149 posts, read 702,573 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Now my questions for those who know regarding this issue.

#1) Can you buy out of state wine in a "Wet" county? The reason I ask this, because I read a article saying talking about the 2006 ruling that may kill the Wineries in Ky because of there inability to sell out of state/county/city, and how hard they made it for out of state wineries to sell in KY [practically impossible from the sound of it?]

#2] Can you travel with sealed alcohol through a "Dry" county? Example one went to another county that does sell alcohol. Purchased it, put it in the trunk, and brought it home, but your travels took you through or into a "Dry" state. This one makes me very curious.

#3] Is there really bootlegging still going on to this day?

Inquiring minds want to know. Plus if my in-laws end up moving over after us, being from England, they will really want to know! They know how to drink!! Hah.

Thanks in advance!
Here's "the law" as i understand it according to dry county where I've dwelled:

Bootlegging carries mandatory 3 days in jail. You're bootlegging if they find whiskey, beer or wine say in trunk of your car - or you're carrying pints of whiskey at public place. But if you're at home in dry county then anything goes. The sheriff can visit and drink with you on yer property, no questions asked.

Meanwhile the worst offence at dry counties is *public drunkeness* - you can get drunk as skunk at home but if you're falling down drunk in town square they'll throw the book at you.

Basically dry county laws are designed for keeping the peace. And it works! I think stats will prove there's fewer assaults and violent crimes in dry counties then at wet ones. Many of these dry counties pre-date early 20th century federal prohibition with their ordinances, reverting to an era when drunken gunslingers roamed the streets even before and shortly after the Civil War.

Quote:
Found this issue very interesting, and did some research about how many counties in Kentucky are still "Dry", really amazing. Sounds like someone is still living in the past! They have even proved with statistics how more "Dry" county residents get into alcohol related accidents than "Wet" county residents! Making people dry vast distances to get alcohol is crazy! If they want it, they will get it! Oh well what do you do. It does sound like there are less and less counties or cities each year, or have that silly "moist" designation to just confuse the issue more.
Do dry county folks actually crash their cars more often then wet county citizens do? Thats probly because they lack experience of drinkin and driving on more regular basis.

(edit: And with respect to marijuana laws, its my understanding that 5 plants home grown are legal throughout the commonwealth as result of decision rendered in the Woody Harrelson case.

Last edited by KYcoyote; 12-21-2007 at 05:20 AM..
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Old 12-21-2007, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Spencer Co. Ky
13 posts, read 74,511 times
Reputation: 12
I saw this & had to post on it, I live in Spencer County which is dry. We have Taylorsville Lake here which is used by everyone. The funny thing is this Jefferson, Bullitt, Nelson, Shelby & Anderson County all surround Spencer. Everyone of those have alcohol sales.
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Old 12-21-2007, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Victoria, Canada
90 posts, read 316,262 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYcoyote View Post
Here's "the law" as i understand it according to dry county where I've dwelled:

Bootlegging carries mandatory 3 days in jail. You're bootlegging if they find whiskey, beer or wine say in trunk of your car - or you're carrying pints of whiskey at public place. But if you're at home in dry county then anything goes. The sheriff can visit and drink with you on yer property, no questions asked.

Meanwhile the worst offence at dry counties is *public drunkeness* - you can get drunk as skunk at home but if you're falling down drunk in town square they'll throw the book at you.

Basically dry county laws are designed for keeping the peace. And it works! I think stats will prove there's fewer assaults and violent crimes in dry counties then at wet ones. Many of these dry counties pre-date early 20th century federal prohibition with their ordinances, reverting to an era when drunken gunslingers roamed the streets even before and shortly after the Civil War.

Do dry county folks actually crash their cars more often then wet county citizens do? Thats probly because they lack experience of drinkin and driving on more regular basis.

(edit: And with respect to marijuana laws, its my understanding that 5 plants home grown are legal throughout the commonwealth as result of decision rendered in the Woody Harrelson case.
That was a good comment on the subject. Of course, I knew all about it myself, with growing up with law enforcement in my family. My sons still enforce the law and I have always respected the law. Most people I know back home use the bootleggers when they want to drink at their home. The people I know wouldn't dare leave their home while intoxicated. Over the two years I have been away from Pulaski county, Burnside went moist. I feel its a good thing for those that like a small drink with their dinner. By the time they are ready to leave, they will be ok to drive. That is if they don't have anymore than a small drink with their dinner. I realize there are some people who prefer to drink in excess. It is a start for Pulaski County,for going moist, and I feel its a good way to see how it goes for afew years before they decide to go wet. And that should depend on just how "Wild West" it gets back there. I hope people use good judgement when drinking, and always have a designated driver to drive after going to parties. The Christmas holidays are here there will be plenty going to parties and drinking. I feel the laws are good for DUI and bootlegging and could probably be alittle stiffer.
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Old 12-23-2007, 05:45 PM
 
149 posts, read 702,573 times
Reputation: 98
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unique Gal View Post
I feel the laws are good for DUI and bootlegging and could probably be alittle stiffer.
UniqueGal, are you sure about this or maybe you been gone too long? Bein former truck driver covering the lower 48, occurs to me states with toughest highway enforcement regs *always* produce the worst drivers on the road.

Meanwhile returning to topic: we hear lots of questions asking for family friendly, crime free locales and i dunno why but nobody mentions dry counties as easily the most peaceable and civilized of all.
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Old 12-24-2007, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Victoria, Canada
90 posts, read 316,262 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by KYcoyote View Post
UniqueGal, are you sure about this or maybe you been gone too long? Bein former truck driver covering the lower 48, occurs to me states with toughest highway enforcement regs *always* produce the worst drivers on the road.

Meanwhile returning to topic: we hear lots of questions asking for family friendly, crime free locales and i dunno why but nobody mentions dry counties as easily the most peaceable and civilized of all.
Ky Coyote, I have been gone way too long. In the 2 yrs I have been gone from Pulaski county, Burnside went moist. Of course, all of Pulaski county probably tries to squeeze in the restraunts that serve liquor with the dinners. The reason I think there should be stiffer fines for DUI is because I have lost several family and/or friends, due to an idiot(s) driving and drinking.
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