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Old 12-29-2010, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Somewhere in Kentucky
3,791 posts, read 4,677,023 times
Reputation: 2332
Quote:
Originally Posted by BennettJ View Post
We're also considering a move to Richmond, KY. We need to live close to a public college so our kids can commute. We've looked at NC, SC, and TN. Didn't much care for SC or TN, but loved NC. Just don't think we could afford the area where I'd like to live (Chapel Hill). I'm having a very hard time of moving south (living in N. IL via eastern PA). I know I'm a snob about it. My husband says it's a good move for us. He's retired. Please someone tell me we're making the right move for our kids!
My dad was retired when he moved all of us to Kentucky from New England. That was 1980. We never left, dad died here and a lot of the family followed and moved here. None of us regret it.
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Old 12-29-2010, 04:35 PM
 
Location: "My Old Kentucky Home"
308 posts, read 310,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BennettJ View Post
We're also considering a move to Richmond, KY. We need to live close to a public college so our kids can commute. We've looked at NC, SC, and TN. Didn't much care for SC or TN, but loved NC. Just don't think we could afford the area where I'd like to live (Chapel Hill). I'm having a very hard time of moving south (living in N. IL via eastern PA). I know I'm a snob about it. My husband says it's a good move for us. He's retired. Please someone tell me we're making the right move for our kids!
Are you interested in any public college or, are you anticipating your kids will attend Eastern Kentucky University?
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Old 12-29-2010, 04:52 PM
 
86 posts, read 93,929 times
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We're considering EKU, but UK would also work. We're just looking to get out of N. IL for a less expensive place to live. Would really consider any state. Our kids are only high school sophomores this year, so we're looking to move this summer. Any other suggestions?
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Old 01-07-2011, 02:07 PM
 
2 posts, read 5,516 times
Reputation: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by InLondon View Post
Umm, but you live in a state with high sales tax and a tax on groceries.....

So it all balances out.....

Does anyone ever do their research? Seriously?
Does anyone understand basic math anymore? Seriously?

For the average household in an average state, at 8% sales tax, you'd have to spend about 150% of your takehome on groceries to break even.

Pffft, state income tax.
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Old 01-07-2011, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Providence, RI
3,816 posts, read 4,754,140 times
Reputation: 2738
quote:"I guess Rhode Island (the worst state in NE) finally ran out of room!!! For what it's worth, there are only two states in NE left worth living. NH and VT. The rest suck big time."


Gee, I'm sure glad we've run out of room according to you. Well, guess I'll be the only one strolling Bellevue Avenue this summer and swimming at Bailey's Beach....

see here.... Home - Newport Mansions
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Old 01-08-2011, 06:31 PM
 
86 posts, read 93,929 times
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Hollytree - you're so fortunate. I would love to live in New England. We visited Portland, Maine once, and I fell in love with it. I believe most parts of New England are way too expensive though. That's why we're looking at a move to KY. You live in an absolutely gorgeous part of the country!
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Old 01-09-2011, 11:54 AM
 
76 posts, read 27,136 times
Reputation: 53
Default Nc > ky?

I am a single guy with no kids and have lived in Raleigh, NC for over 3 years (am originally from the UK) and TBH, this town is so overrated and I am ready to move as its not for me at all.
I have never felt at home here and I haven't ever connected with people.
I don't know why but I have some ideas.

KY seems to have the right kind of geography and climate for me, but I know nothing else about it.
I will read up on wikipedia and elsewhere, but I would like to know about the real situation with work & jobs and about the "personality/character/attitudes" of the people, generally speaking of course.

Also, the typical cost of utilities, internet, food and rent for 1-2 bed apartments.
Grocery shopping in Raleigh is out of order & I need to rob a bank to live healthily as promoted by the health profession.
You need 2 incomes or at least $50K to live reasonably here.

(I am willing to consider other states that do not have too much cold/snow, heat, very big cities, heavy-ish traffic or left wing leanings).

Last edited by Volt61; 01-09-2011 at 12:13 PM..
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Old 01-09-2011, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Orange County, CA
3,213 posts, read 5,081,171 times
Reputation: 2036
Quote:
Originally Posted by BennettJ View Post
We're considering EKU, but UK would also work. We're just looking to get out of N. IL for a less expensive place to live. Would really consider any state. Our kids are only high school sophomores this year, so we're looking to move this summer. Any other suggestions?
I did respond to your question in the Lexington Area forum about central Kentucky.

You might also consider extreme northern Kentucky as it has Northern KY University and, across the river, the University of Cincinnati (although I personally hate its campus). Live in Boone County, Edgewood, Elsmere, Erlanger, or Fort Thomas as these are the best communities on the Kentucky side of river as far as public schools go. Although, Madeira, Mason and Wyoming over in Ohio have some of the best public schools in the entire region and, in the case of Wyoming, the nation.

How about Louisville? You have to be very discerning with Jefferson County Public Schools, although duPont Manual, Male and I believe Ballard are known to be fine schools. Oldham County Public is the best countywide school system in the state and its property taxes tend to be about the same as suburban Jefferson County but lower than urban JC.

Although, if you want my personal recommendation, I'd look into the areas around Raleigh-Durham, Atlanta's northern suburbs, Dallas-Fort Worth, or Houston's northern and western suburbs if you want to move south. Charlotte, Nashville, and Birmingham, believe it or not, may be good choices, too; some of Birmingham's suburbs such as Mountain Brook, Vestavia and Hoover are known nationwide for strong public schools academically.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Volt61 View Post
I am a single guy with no kids and have lived in Raleigh, NC for over 3 years (am originally from the UK) and TBH, this town is so overrated and I am ready to move as its not for me at all.
I have never felt at home here and I haven't ever connected with people.
I don't know why but I have some ideas.

KY seems to have the right kind of geography and climate for me, but I know nothing else about it.
I will read up on wikipedia and elsewhere, but I would like to know about the real situation with work & jobs and about the "personality/character/attitudes" of the people, generally speaking of course.

Also, the typical cost of utilities, internet, food and rent for 1-2 bed apartments.
Grocery shopping in Raleigh is out of order & I need to rob a bank to live healthily as promoted by the health profession.
You need 2 incomes or at least $50K to live reasonably here.

(I am willing to consider other states that do not have too much cold/snow, heat, very big cities, heavy-ish traffic or left wing leanings).
Interesting.

I went to Raleigh about three weeks ago and really got a very good impression of the area.

KY geography is similar, generally speaking, although when there's no vegetation on the trees, such as right now, the terrain looks depressing IMO. Winters are a little colder than NC but not as cold as, say, your Great Lakes states; still, they can be very depressing.

People are generally friendly, but it can be superficial rather than genuine. Northern KY as well as the C. Ky. cities of Louisville and Lexington are not so friendly, IMO. Some of the smaller towns around C. Ky. such as Winchester, Georgetown, Shelbyville, and Bardstown have something of a "nose in the air" aura in my experience. (Although Louisville can be an incredibly fun town to party in .) Rural communities throughout the rest of the state can be very hit and miss. Most of the people in Kentucky are good, so don't think you'll have died and gone to the middle of Detroit or Camden at risk of being shot at, or to Dallas or Chicago at risk of being ran off the road because you're "ONLY" going 20 MPH over the speed limit.

Louisville and extreme N. KY are the state's only large urban areas, and even they aren't as large as Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham, or Winston-Salem/Greensboro. Of course, N. KY is an immediate part of Greater Cincinnati, which is larger than all three of NC's largest metropolitan areas. Lexington is the state's second-large city and metropolitan area, but it doesn't feel very urban at all; in fact, more like a much smaller Raleigh or Nashville, only with more stuck up people. Lexington, believe it or not, actually has the worst overall traffic situation in the state, although the interstates leading into downtown Louisville, Covington and Newport can be hairy, dicey and clogged during rush hour.

Job market: Sucks. Lexington and Bowling Green are more stable than anywhere else in the state, but even their economies are growing very, very slowly. Louisville and N. Ky. aren't doing so bad, either, comparative to much of the U.S. Kentucky has had a rather insignificant drop in housing/property values because we didn't have the mass housing and "creative financing" boom that states such as Florida, California, Arizona, and Nevada had--oh, and to a smaller extent, North Carolina. Kentucky, along with West Virginia and Indiana, has had about the most stable property values in the nation during this bad economy.

Groceries, utilities, internet generally same in KY as NC, per cost of living calculators and measures. Housing and rent generally a little cheaper in KY, although if you look carefully in some of the smaller towns near NC cities you can find some pretty good deals.

Kentucky is not a bad place to live and many would welcome you with open arms if you move here. We luv furiners (*cough* I meant to say "We love foreigners.") Take it as a term of endearment. Although if you gave me the choice of NC or KY, I'd pick NC any day.

Last edited by EclecticEars; 01-09-2011 at 01:20 PM..
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Old 01-09-2011, 02:48 PM
 
76 posts, read 27,136 times
Reputation: 53
NC is quite deceptive.

It can seem nice during a brief visit, as it appeared after a reconnaissance visit before deciding to come here and so I can see how you might have that view.

There's no real signs of its downside when you visit and so you only discover these once you've committed to living here for x months or years.

The "best place to live" tag that was given to Raleigh in 2006 must have been bought because i can't see the basis of it being earned.

There are good and nice things here, such as low or non-existent crime (at least in the Northern parts of the city), low traffic, apparently a good place to raise kids, its not a busy city and you can get anywhere quite easily.

But the town is really small-town minded, parochial, and disinterested in progress and growth. There are no mid-level jobs but plenty of $8 an hour jobs.
The folk here, while pleasant on the surface, seem to only like their own kind ESPECIALLY local government/city people and there is a clear aloof/snobby mindset between those who grew up and live inside the "real" Raleigh city and those who have "abandoned" the city by going to live outside this zone, which is separated from the rest of the city by a circular road, previously known as the Beltline.

And be very careful when you drive here -

I think there a fair amount of people here who like to think that they are more "international" (probably because of RTP), but really, there is not much evidence of this, other than the word "international" being added to the airport name.
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Old 01-09-2011, 03:06 PM
 
Location: Madison, WI
14,964 posts, read 19,677,751 times
Reputation: 7452
Quote:
Originally Posted by BennettJ View Post
Hollytree - you're so fortunate. I would love to live in New England. We visited Portland, Maine once, and I fell in love with it. I believe most parts of New England are way too expensive though. That's why we're looking at a move to KY. You live in an absolutely gorgeous part of the country!
The northern areas are not expensive at all. Quite a few off-grid houses with farms in northern Maine.
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