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Old 08-22-2007, 08:25 AM
 
4 posts, read 36,548 times
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I am looking for a listing, perhaps a dictionary of sorts, that addresses all of the slang terms in Kentucky. Anyone know of a place, perhaps on the internet, where I can find it?

Thanks ya'll~!
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Old 08-22-2007, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Vancouver, WA
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LOL... my mom sent me an e-mail once that was a "Hillbilly to English" translation list. It was pretty funny and absurdly accurate!

You gotta love it!
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Old 08-22-2007, 08:32 AM
 
4 posts, read 36,548 times
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Do you still have it? Perhaps to post here?
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Old 08-22-2007, 09:12 AM
 
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I found this on the internet-- hillbilly dickshunairy Since I am not yet a Kentuckian perhaps someone could tell me if it's appropriate for the region??
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Old 08-22-2007, 09:34 AM
 
Location: Kentucky
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well at least SOME of it is lol
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Old 08-22-2007, 04:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LuvinKINTUKEE View Post
I am looking for a listing, perhaps a dictionary of sorts, that addresses all of the slang terms in Kentucky. Anyone know of a place, perhaps on the internet, where I can find it?

Thanks ya'll~!
Urban Dictionary: Define Your World is funny and contains alot of slang
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Old 11-11-2007, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky
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Official Wallins Creek Kentucky Homepage (http://www.wallinscreek.com/ - broken link)

Appalachian Dialect of Eastern Kentucky

American Dialect Links

Last edited by GreatPumpkin; 11-11-2007 at 04:24 PM.. Reason: still not formatting right
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Old 01-13-2011, 05:09 PM
 
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Well I have some friends that live in Kentucky who are actually from California and I tend to give them as much **** about it as possible. I call them Kentuckississipians for some reason.
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Old 01-14-2011, 09:42 AM
 
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Actually, there are a number of different dialects in Kentucky, and they may change within a ten-mile distance! Long-time Nicholasville residents and natives speak a bit differently than do long-time Lexingtonians - not vocabulary so much as pronunciation, which to my Lexingtonian ear sounds a little twangier and a little slower. By contrast, northern Kentuckians sound much like Cincinnatians, with a distinctive sound to As and other vowels, "Please?" instead of "what did you say?" or "excuse me?" (straight from the German "bitte", I'm told, in this heavily Germanic-settled area), and much less twang. Louisvillians' speech is subtly different from Lexingtonians' speech, but I can't quite put my finger on the difference.

And I won't even attempt to describe western or eastern Kentuckians, though speech in the mountain areas is much different from that of the rest of the commonwealth, both in pronunciation, tempo (slower), and vocabulary and grammar. However, all these differences are becoming much less, well, pronounced, due to the influences of the mass media.

Check out "The Story of English"'s "Guid Scots Tongue" chapter for a fascinating account of the Scots-Irish influence on the typical speech and language patterns of not only the Southern Appalachians but also the Ozarks, Oklahoma, and (surprise!) even parts of California, due to Dust Bowl migration.
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Old 02-20-2011, 02:21 AM
 
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Teresa
I could add a whole other language that my Mom says.
One that I've only heard her and a very few others say is:
Face-Fomus- When cars hit head on, or you come face to face with anything it is, facefomus.
Has anyone else heard this one?
She also says a lot of words backwards like: peckerwood, 410-K (her pension plan).
I could go on and on. My brother-in-law has always told My Sister and Me that we should write this stuff down.
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