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Old 08-31-2007, 07:30 PM
 
Location: Springfield, IL
2 posts, read 6,104 times
Reputation: 10

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I'm not sure how many of you out there are aware of this method of mining. From my understanding, the top of the mountain is removed to get a seam of coal. It took about 235 million years to create these beautiful mountains in Eastern Kentucky. There is no replacing what is removed and our children will never enjoy what took so long to create. Perry County used to have a mountain called "Lost Mountain" which had the highest elevation in the county. Not no more. A memorial is set up at this link ilovemountains - End Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining Lost Mountain, KY. I'm not from Ky or do I live there, but was awestruck by its beauty on vacation and have gone back the last 3 years. I just want it to be preserved. There must be a better way.
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Old 08-31-2007, 08:02 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,927,262 times
Reputation: 13282
Yes, their MUST be a better way. Mountaintop removal should be illegal in the US and the world. I have seen the devastation first-hand when it comes to mountaintop removal. Their are many streams that are buried, water supplies contaminated, forests destroyed, wildlife habitats lost, and flooding due to the removal of vegetation and trees from mountain slopes. It is a problem that NEEDS to be adressed quickly.
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Old 09-02-2007, 02:42 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,927,262 times
Reputation: 13282
I am bumping this thread up to see if anyone has information they could share about eastern Kentucky and mountaintop removal. This has really devastated many communities in Appalachia. I really do not think it is right, considering many of the counties in eastern Kentucky devastated by mountaintop removal are also some of the poorest in the country.
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Old 09-30-2007, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Thumb of Michigan
4,489 posts, read 6,784,343 times
Reputation: 2533
One of our members (Shadowcaver) posted a good website dealing with mountaintop removal.

Southern Appalachian Mountain Stewards

I have witness this "phenom" across the valley from where i grew up in southeastern Kentucky off of 119. It is ugly, to say the least. It makes me sad every time i go down there only to see the mountain get barer and lower.
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Old 10-01-2007, 12:43 AM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,927,262 times
Reputation: 13282
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Grass Fever View Post
One of our members (Shadowcaver) posted a good website dealing with mountaintop removal.

Southern Appalachian Mountain Stewards

I have witness this "phenom" across the valley from where i grew up in southeastern Kentucky off of 119. It is ugly, to say the least. It makes me sad every time i go down there only to see the mountain get barer and lower.
The vegetation also grows back very slowly if at all in the areas affected by mountiaintop removal. This creates serious erosion and potential flooding problems in the towns in the valley areas.
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Old 06-04-2008, 12:03 PM
 
20 posts, read 113,639 times
Reputation: 21
Well, considering the fact that over 65% of the U.S. electricity comes from coal, how would you suggest we get it out? Did you take a hot shower this morning, turn on a light, drink coffee or even plug in your diesel truck to keep it warm. hmm There are very strict rules in place for mining nowadays. Trees and grass have to be replanted. However, your loggers have little and almost no rules to cutting your trees and dragging them across the land. The mining that went on years ago was not stictly regulated, but it has changed very much. If you took away coal mining in southeast KY, you would have 80% of the people on welfare, or worse, leave the area to find work. If you do not work for a mining company, then you work for a supply company that sells to them or a machinery company. Please think about that when you go to bed and watch TV and set your alarm - you might have to buy a rooster.
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Old 06-04-2008, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Pikeville, Ky.
13,570 posts, read 21,710,437 times
Reputation: 18105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Grass Fever View Post
One of our members (Shadowcaver) posted a good website dealing with mountaintop removal.

Southern Appalachian Mountain Stewards

I have witness this "phenom" across the valley from where i grew up in southeastern Kentucky off of 119. It is ugly, to say the least. It makes me sad every time i go down there only to see the mountain get barer and lower.
I live along old 119 (Zebulon, Meta area)Have you seen it since it has been reclaimed..Beautiful!! Have you driven the newly opened 119 through this ares..The reclamation work is some of the most beautiful scenery I have seen Have you taken the tour to see Elks thriving on reclaimed land? Have you gone to see the wonderful Ky. Mountain horses that are free to graze the reclaimed mountaintops? Yes, the mountain is ugly and barren until it has been reclaimed, but what beauty to behold when it is reclaimed..
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Old 06-04-2008, 01:03 PM
 
20 posts, read 113,639 times
Reputation: 21
Odd, isn't it, how people don't mind taking out the scenery for a mall, or new subdivision? lol
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Old 06-04-2008, 01:14 PM
 
Location: Pikeville, Ky.
13,570 posts, read 21,710,437 times
Reputation: 18105
No shopping malls here on the mountaintops..Not 100% sure about subdivisions either..The cost of building good access roads would be astronomical..We favor the return of nature and the improvements in it which bring back the animals that once were so abundant here..
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