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Old 01-08-2008, 08:37 AM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
4,809 posts, read 8,260,161 times
Reputation: 1958

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As a lifetime Kentuckian, with several "First Families" (those who were here before statehood in 1792), we are complicated people. We are good o'boys, gentleladies, who are often very highly educated rednecks. We love our state, hate our governments but love our representative. We have extreme views on life like the Hatfields and McCoys, but we'll cross the lines to get married. It's hard to tell who has a dime or who has a dollar. We'll take care of each other, yet we're considered stand-offish. I like to tell people that because my grandfather worked in the oil fields while his twin was a noted preacher, I learned to cuss on my knees.

Just by reading the posts to this blog, if a reader can't realize the complications of being Kentuckian, they need to read on. I don't want nor plan to live anywhere else on this fine Earth.
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Old 01-08-2008, 12:14 PM
 
Location: Pendleton County, KY
241 posts, read 885,082 times
Reputation: 149
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomocox View Post
As a lifetime Kentuckian, with several "First Families" (those who were here before statehood in 1792), we are complicated people. We are good o'boys, gentleladies, who are often very highly educated rednecks. We love our state, hate our governments but love our representative. We have extreme views on life like the Hatfields and McCoys, but we'll cross the lines to get married. It's hard to tell who has a dime or who has a dollar. We'll take care of each other, yet we're considered stand-offish. I like to tell people that because my grandfather worked in the oil fields while his twin was a noted preacher, I learned to cuss on my knees.

Just by reading the posts to this blog, if a reader can't realize the complications of being Kentuckian, they need to read on. I don't want nor plan to live anywhere else on this fine Earth.
I'm not a native, but I moved here when I was 14 (27 years ago) and have been hooked ever since--largely because of the qualities you mention above.
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Old 01-08-2008, 01:28 PM
 
Location: Michigan
379 posts, read 1,126,991 times
Reputation: 71
Z11pace in answer to tornados in Danville area,every major storm outbreak seems to go north or south of Danville,at least thats what Ive been told and have observed a fluke of nature maybe?and yes Danville has its share of Humid days.The Kentucky river isn't far from Danville and Ive seen plenty of boating out their.
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Old 01-08-2008, 02:56 PM
 
527 posts, read 1,566,783 times
Reputation: 358
Quote:
Originally Posted by z11pace View Post
Hi i was wondering if tornados are frequent in the danville area? How is the summer humidity, and is there boating in the danville area?
Herrington Lake (32 miles long) is very close to Danville....very few tornados, about five in the last 30+ years according to the National Climatic Center website (NOAA's) site.
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Old 01-08-2008, 02:58 PM
 
216 posts, read 817,459 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomocox View Post
As a lifetime Kentuckian, with several "First Families" (those who were here before statehood in 1792), we are complicated people. We are good o'boys, gentleladies, who are often very highly educated rednecks. We love our state, hate our governments but love our representative. We have extreme views on life like the Hatfields and McCoys, but we'll cross the lines to get married. It's hard to tell who has a dime or who has a dollar. We'll take care of each other, yet we're considered stand-offish. I like to tell people that because my grandfather worked in the oil fields while his twin was a noted preacher, I learned to cuss on my knees.

Just by reading the posts to this blog, if a reader can't realize the complications of being Kentuckian, they need to read on. I don't want nor plan to live anywhere else on this fine Earth.
Thank you for your explanation. Very interesting! In your explanation of complicated, would you say that there are areas that are more complicated than others? Do you find this more in the rural areas or is it just as prevelant in the larger cities too?
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Old 01-08-2008, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Louisville KY Metro area
4,809 posts, read 8,260,161 times
Reputation: 1958
Heck, the cities are far more complicated. The rural areas are generally just simply fine folks, that is the rural areas with a high per capita of native people.
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Old 01-09-2008, 03:05 PM
 
216 posts, read 817,459 times
Reputation: 119
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomocox View Post
Heck, the cities are far more complicated. The rural areas are generally just simply fine folks, that is the rural areas with a high per capita of native people.
Good to hear! In my humble opinion, complicated places are far more interesting places to live.
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Old 01-10-2008, 03:51 PM
 
12,398 posts, read 15,045,437 times
Reputation: 14619
Quote:
Originally Posted by gb lady View Post
It's January now and I'm to the point where I can no longer just say I'm moving to Kentucky in June. I have to start putting my plans in motion and make a definite commitment.

I'd like input from people who made the transition from another state to Kentucky -- Do you regret it? If so, why?
Gblady, I am not a native, but I have lived here since December of 74. My h is a native..I am from the Cincinnati-Dayton area..So I do know city living. Anyway, living in the mountains was a childhood dream of mine..When our children were 6,7,8, and 10 , my h got a call from a friend here who offered him a job here that paid almost double what he was making at a big plant in Dayton..I was so happy to get my children away from the city life, and the drug scene that was beginning to be prevalent in the schools..I was raised mainly in the country and I wanted my children to enjoy the gifts of nature every day, I wanted to be able to visit school and participate in their education, I wanted to be able to know all their friends and their parents. I wanted my children not to be afraid to be out playing after dark on a hot summer night..None of us have ever regretted coming to this area. My "City" family in Cincy, Dayton and Springfield never thought I would stay My children are grown now and have given me 9 grandchildren..3 of my four children live within 30 minutes of me and 7 of the grandchildren do too..My children are educated, have decent homes and enjoy life and the grandchildren are safe and secure knowing that they can count on friends, family and even most strangers to help them if needed..I have seen so many changes here in the 35 years I have called it home..I notice that most posts about this area are about things that went on years and years ago..Yes, we are growing, but I thank God that there is not enough flat land here that we would outgrow our "small town friendliness" I have everything I need here, and am within a couple of hours from wherever else I want to be in all directions. We are expecting a commuter airport shortly that is well anticipated..
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Old 01-10-2008, 04:19 PM
 
Location: Pendleton County, KY
241 posts, read 885,082 times
Reputation: 149
In response to the OP's question, I only have one regret. Prior to moving to my present home, I lived in the Northern Kentucky 'burbs just outside of Cincinnati. I really wanted to live in the country, and the home we live in now met all my requirements. It's roughly 40 miles from my place of employment, which means I have about an hour commute to work each way. But I don't find that intolerable. Anything more would be though.

And that's the regretful part. I've been with my employer nearly 15 years and have a lot of blood, sweat, and tears invested in my job, so I'm reluctant to quit it. But my employer recently informed the staff that the company soon will be relocating nearly 20 miles north of its current location in downtown Cincinnati. That's going to push my commute to nearly 60 miles and add some of the most congested highway traffic to my trip. I anticipate my commute is going to jump to at least 90-120 minutes each way! That's 3-4 hours a day in my car! Unless I can work out some kind of four-day-workweek or telecommuting arrarrangement, I'll probably have to quit and find something closer to home. I'm sure as hell not moving to Ohio!
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