U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 02-06-2015, 07:42 AM
 
1,394 posts, read 1,878,820 times
Reputation: 857

Advertisements

This thread is just for fun, and I know it will stir up a bit of debate cause I know folks don't see things the same. I also think that my borders are my own personal conclusion and a bit "generalized"
I'm curious where "you" think the geographical divisions "begin and end" in Kentucky. Here's the way I divide the state simply:

1.) Eastern Kentucky
2.) Northern Kentucky
3.) Central Kentucky
4.) Western Kentucky

I didn't include a "southern Kentucky region" because each of the distinct regions has a southern frontier, except for northern Kentucky who's southern borders are along the northern fringes of Kentucky's other geo regions except for western.

What do you think are the trademarks of each of the states regions?


1.) Eastern Kentucky - Rugged high hills to mountains and valleys. Heavy coal and timber production, infrastructure needs improvement, unfortunately contains the states highest number of those living in poverty and lowest economic numbers.

2.) Northern Kentucky - Southern suburbs of Cinncinnati along the north/central fringe, historically one of the oldest parts of the state, also fairly agricultural in areas. Some industries also with coal production along the eastern tier of this region. Includes some areas that are fairly hilly and rugged in spots.

3.) Central Kentucky - Most likely the wealthiest areas in Kentucky fall within this region, most well developed infrastructure, however does include pockets of poverty. Areas of forested hills and mountains along the Knobs region and southeastern tier, but also heavily agricultural as well. Whiskey and Tobacco production are produced fairly heavily in the arc including 2 of the states most largest cities, Louisville and Lexington. Also if not the equal to the northern Kentucky region, definately the 2nd oldest part of the state with some very early settlement. Contains Kentucky's famed "Bluegrass Region"

4.) Western Kentucky - Some virtually flat and swampy areas in the far west to rolling with high hills, forested with long, low ridges and valleys. Some areas contain quality timber yet this region is Kentucky's "agricultural giant if you may" Coal, Tobacco, Corn and Soybeans are heavily produced as is wheat. Some industries, also contains Kentucky's 3rd and 4th largest cities respectively Owensboro and Bowling Green. This region is also well known for it's BBQ as well. This region does also include pockets of poverty and some rural areas are not necessarily strong economically in spots. Includes the famous "Mammoth Caves Nat'l Park" and "Land Between The Lakes"

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 02-06-2015, 10:30 PM
 
11,822 posts, read 9,739,177 times
Reputation: 21723
Way back when I studied Kentucky geography in school, I was taught that Kentucky had seven regions: The Eastern Kentucky Coalfields, the Western Kentucky Coalfields, the Inner Bluegrass, the Outer Bluegrass, the Knobs, the Jackson Purchase, and the Pennyrile. As for distinct characteristics of each of these regions, I'd have to wing it at this point - actually, I'm surprised I remembered all seven regions! However, if you'd look up each of these regions, or just search for "regions of Kentucky", I expect you could find good descriptions and explanations of what makes each region unique.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2015, 09:30 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky Proud
955 posts, read 1,438,423 times
Reputation: 987
Not trying to stir up anything, just thinking out loud. Personally, I think drawing lines is part of Kentucky's problem. With our society being Hell bent on equality and taking political correctness to the max, it makes me wonder. Me, being an old feller and, only having been out of this holler a time or two (I almost went to Cincinnati once), wonder if other states does the same?

But, then again, what could I possibly know?



Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2015, 10:08 AM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
8,750 posts, read 14,175,354 times
Reputation: 35733
Good post, Craig. Nuff said.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-07-2015, 10:42 AM
 
11,822 posts, read 9,739,177 times
Reputation: 21723
Quote:
Originally Posted by hogsrus View Post
Not trying to stir up anything, just thinking out loud. Personally, I think drawing lines is part of Kentucky's problem. With our society being Hell bent on equality and taking political correctness to the max, it makes me wonder. Me, being an old feller and, only having been out of this holler a time or two (I almost went to Cincinnati once), wonder if other states does the same?

But, then again, what could I possibly know?



Depends on what kind of lines are being drawn. If you're just looking at geographic areas, with focus on natural geography, that's one thing - my previous post referred to the classic seven geographic regions of Kentucky, all of which are distinct in their natural features. But if you're looking at drawing social-political-economic lines, that's something else entirely, as hogsrus notes.

However - it should be possible to recognize differences and distinctions without rating those individuals and communities and areas which demonstrate such differences and distinctions.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-08-2015, 08:12 AM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
11,022 posts, read 22,472,784 times
Reputation: 10911
Like others said it is complex. Kentucky varies a lot in topography and culture and just 20 miles can make a big difference. That said I think Northern and Eastern KY are divided up more by terrain IMO. Just get out a topo map and find the edge of the hills to define either. Though technically in the Pennyroyal Region Appalachian culture extends to the edge of Somerset, Berea, Clay City, Morehead, and Vanceburg. South of Lake Cumberland is a tough one, it's very rugged but the hills are smaller. I think most of Clinton and all of Wayne Co are Appalachia.

NKY is defined by the rugged little hills of the northern Bluegrass. North of La Grange / Frankfort / Sadieville / Carlisle , etc is NKY to me. Then you have the urban part which is a different animal in itself
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2015, 08:54 AM
 
1,394 posts, read 1,878,820 times
Reputation: 857
Well maybe I should clarify a bit...

The other day I was reading an article and they were mentioning "northern Kentucky or "central Kentucky" and I thought to myself: "Ok where DOES, for example, eastern Kentucky begin and Northern Kentucky end, for example?. Seems everyone has different answers. So, I decided to draw up a simple map on where I think the boundaries of the regions are. I realise it's a bit simplified and generalized. Also I know many maps are very specific ( which is cool ) and show a "Bluegrass Region" "Western Coalfields" "Pennyrile Plateau" "Knobs Region" etc etc....I just was curious what areas folks consider "Northern Kentucky" "Central Kentucky" etc etc. That was my main idea, just curious more than anything.

Actually thought it might be interesting to where in peoples minds the different regions fall. I'm a bit of a geography buff....so here's a bit of a revised map, I'm sticking with this one. For example, some folks consider N Ky just the top 3 counties but I decided to include a few of the adjacent counties just to the south. Maybe western Kentucky's border could go a bit further to the west? But I've always considered Breckinridge County and Grayson County as "western" while "Hardin County" more central. I was just curious to hear what others think, that's all.

Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-09-2015, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Eastern Kentucky Proud
955 posts, read 1,438,423 times
Reputation: 987
Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Depends on what kind of lines are being drawn. If you're just looking at geographic areas, with focus on natural geography, that's one thing - my previous post referred to the classic seven geographic regions of Kentucky, all of which are distinct in their natural features. But if you're looking at drawing social-political-economic lines, that's something else entirely, as hogsrus notes.

However - it should be possible to recognize differences and distinctions without rating those individuals and communities and areas which demonstrate such differences and distinctions.
Correct Mr. Creek...I wasn't talking about geographical lines. I remember those regions you mentioned but, I couldn't remember all of them...either you have a better memory than I or, I may have missed that lesson.

Geographical regions of Kentucky isn't talked about much these days but, social, political and economic regions are. It would appear, when social, political and economic lines are drawn in Kentucky, sadly enough, some of us tend to come out the loser's. I guess some of us live on the wrong side of the tracks so to speak...those on the outside looking in can only conclude that some of us must be "bad people" or, any number of other colorful descriptions. Politicians do the same when they want to turn the spotlight off of themselves and their own inconsistencies creating a diversion. And, it works. The present state of our great Country and State proves that. What you see ain't always what ye get.



Last edited by hogsrus; 02-09-2015 at 09:34 AM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-03-2015, 06:36 AM
 
1,394 posts, read 1,878,820 times
Reputation: 857
Well, my map wasn't meant to be politcal more geographical than anything...just curiosity. I really just wanted to see other folks maps and where they divide western from central from northern from eastern and why...

I'm a geography nut and love maps. Kinda big map nerd, always have been LOL
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 03-08-2015, 12:09 PM
 
536 posts, read 791,988 times
Reputation: 382
I love maps too Eric. Always studying them. Yeah I was wondering where NKY ended too. I know if you count Boone, Kenton and Campbell Counties, that would be the true northern KY area, but now Grant is also sort of part of NKY and Scott county would be on the very edge. Then you have the by the river like Brooksville, Maysville, Agusta. Places like that, not sure if they would be considered part of northern KY or not. And how far does Western KY go? Some consider Owensboro part of the western KY region. Which is farther from that area known as Western KY.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:



Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2021, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top