U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-15-2007, 06:17 PM
 
7 posts, read 24,176 times
Reputation: 13

Advertisements

How's the humidity in the Lexington area? Is it as suffocating as what I experienced in Atlanta this summer? Thank You for your help!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-17-2007, 12:03 PM
 
Location: North Alabama
403 posts, read 1,290,198 times
Reputation: 234
Afternoon humidity in Lexington in the summer runs nears 60%. Atlanta's runs just very slightly higher, touching 60% in July, August, and September. Average daytime highs look to run 3-4 degrees lower in Lexington though.

Last edited by nalabama; 01-17-2007 at 12:09 PM.. Reason: Add data
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2007, 01:24 PM
 
458 posts, read 1,661,596 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by nalabama View Post
Afternoon humidity in Lexington in the summer runs nears 60%. Atlanta's runs just very slightly higher, touching 60% in July, August, and September. Average daytime highs look to run 3-4 degrees lower in Lexington though.
So do you just swelter all summer then? I find Atlanta unbearable in the summer--even sometimes in the Spring. I am hoping that the few degrees less of temp means its not enough to make you want to die???
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2007, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Apple Valley, Ca
437 posts, read 1,603,807 times
Reputation: 146
As you can see I was Bound for Texas but mmmmaaaayyyyybe not.

I was thinking of moving to Texas but now that I see how bad the winters are maybe I should look somewhere else.

I see that your State is very beautiful and green so that must mean you get lots of rain. Is this true.

Can you tell me how hot it gets in Kentucky and how cold in the winters.

We are not sure what we are going to do yet but we should look at other States before deciding.

We are looking for a place to retire with a house and about 4 or 5 acres. We have 8 dogs who are our babies and hope they are excepted wherever we go.
We would need to be outside of the City.

Will if everything goes well, maybe I will change my username to something Ky. thanks

Last edited by Just Lookin; 01-17-2007 at 01:49 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2007, 02:07 PM
 
Location: North Alabama
403 posts, read 1,290,198 times
Reputation: 234
Micah Girl, my family left KY in the early sixties, though I visit relatives there frequently. Where I live now in Alabama is more like Atlanta than Lexington, and I find the difference in temperature makes a noticeable difference in comfort. I will retire to the hills north of Frankfort at the earliest opportunity.

Bound for Texas, climate data for Kentucky's larger cities is available at www.city-data.com. Click on Kentucky and a list of towns over 6,000 in population will either come up or be available as option. Pick a larger city out of that list (Frankfort for example, or one close to your area of interest) and click on it. Scroll down the page that comes up and you should find graphs with climate data for that location. Good luck.

Edit: Easier yet, just type the name of the city you want to know about in the "City" block in the middle of the page at www.city-data.com and it should come up for you.

Last edited by nalabama; 01-17-2007 at 02:14 PM.. Reason: further info
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2007, 03:00 PM
 
458 posts, read 1,661,596 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by nalabama View Post
Micah Girl, my family left KY in the early sixties, though I visit relatives there frequently. Where I live now in Alabama is more like Atlanta than Lexington, and I find the difference in temperature makes a noticeable difference in comfort. I will retire to the hills north of Frankfort at the earliest opportunity.

Bound for Texas, climate data for Kentucky's larger cities is available at www.city-data.com. Click on Kentucky and a list of towns over 6,000 in population will either come up or be available as option. Pick a larger city out of that list (Frankfort for example, or one close to your area of interest) and click on it. Scroll down the page that comes up and you should find graphs with climate data for that location. Good luck.

Edit: Easier yet, just type the name of the city you want to know about in the "City" block in the middle of the page at www.city-data.com and it should come up for you.
Thanks again!!!! I feel glad to hear that there is a difference.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2007, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Central Kentucky
850 posts, read 2,114,910 times
Reputation: 467
Micah and Bound - One good thing about Kentucky - the weather is always changing.

I have lived here all my life, and the weather has never ceased to surprise me. The winters can be severly cold with temps in the teens or below, or it can be relatively mild and stay around the 40's with a few 50's to 60's thrown in. Summers range from rainey and 80's to bright sun and 80's, 90's occassionally (usually in August), and the humidity can send you back to the shower the minute you come out.

When it is State Fair time in Louisville ( middle of August), the joke is - you know we will be close to 100 degrees, it has to, because it is time for the Fair.

It really just depends on the jet stream, as we are situated east of the Mississippi, and the Ohio is the border from Northern KY down to Paducah, where it hits the Miss.

We get a little bit of everything, and you can never predict what the winter or summer will bring. I have seen snow on Derby Day, the first Saturday in May - and 70 degrees on Christmas Day - but we do have four very distinct seasons.

The only thing I would caution anyone about before moving here are allergies and illnesses such as Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatifue Syndrome.

Everyone around developes the 'Kentucky Crud' as we call it - sinus stuffiness and drainage most of the year, but much worse in the fall and spring - and for some reason, there is a path that runs along this area, about a 100 mile radius up the Ohio which has the highest incidence of Fibro and CFS anywhere in the states.

I have no idea why, other than the constant change in barometric pressure. You can always tell when it is going to change if you have ailments such as these - especially arthritis. And yes, I have Fibromyalgia. Developed it about 6 years ago.

So - as far as the weather is concerned, you name it, we have it, and you never know when it will do what. It was in the 60's on Monday. Right this second it is 36 degrees.

The countryside and people make up for it though, and other than Florida, there is NO place I would rather be.

KimmieyKY
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-17-2007, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Apple Valley, Ca
437 posts, read 1,603,807 times
Reputation: 146
kimmieyky, thanks so much for all that info. I think what is bothering me is old age and I can't really take the cold much any more. SO I sure would love to move to a place that isn't so cold and hot in the summer.

We live in the Calif desert and it gets really cold and hot in the summer but not a lot of humidity. The wind is a killer here. If not for the wind, I wouldn't be so cold. Pipes are freezing and breaking here. I have had enough. To old to dig holes and fix pipes. What is your humidity in the summer?

I think we can take 90 degrees because we get 110-115 some summers.
DO you have swamp coolers there or A/C's. Does it rain all the time?

Thanks again.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2007, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Michigan
379 posts, read 1,126,667 times
Reputation: 71
Its differant here man,the humidness is higher than where I lived before up north.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 05-23-2007, 11:04 PM
 
216 posts, read 817,271 times
Reputation: 119
[

The only thing I would caution anyone about before moving here are allergies and illnesses such as Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatifue Syndrome.

Everyone around developes the 'Kentucky Crud' as we call it - sinus stuffiness and drainage most of the year, but much worse in the fall and spring - and for some reason, there is a path that runs along this area, about a 100 mile radius up the Ohio which has the highest incidence of Fibro and CFS anywhere in the states.

I have no idea why, other than the constant change in barometric pressure. You can always tell when it is going to change if you have ailments such as these - especially arthritis. And yes, I have Fibromyalgia. Developed it about 6 years ago.

KimmieyKY[/quote]

Interesting. Tell me more about the 100 mile path. I've never heard of that!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Kentucky
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top