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Old 11-08-2007, 04:41 PM
 
Location: Little Rock
24 posts, read 46,306 times
Reputation: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tennesseestorm View Post
These trees are sold in Kingsport @ a well-known green house and are supposedly free of diseases and bugs.

I am curious, what are these "places" you are referring to? They prohibit people from planting what they want on their own property?

The only really "non-native" plant I have is the Windmill palm and Live Oak. The Longleaf pine is native to areas just slightly south of here and zoned a "7A" tree, which we are on the border of. The Live Oak is native to the southeast USA and I doubt they will cause any harm, since they are nothing more than an Oak tree, which there are many of around here.

If you are referring to trees that are non-native to the USA, I fully agree with that, but these trees are well known to other areas of the southeast.
Some of the mountain subdivisions have restrictions on planting in that area of the country. Even regional plants can be a problem. Several years ago, I purchased some plants to add to my yard (they were a typical local plant) from a big nursery but were grown in Louisana. I had about 80 such plants total. The Louisana grown plants carried a blight that pretty much wiped out all my other plants and I had to remove and destroy all but about 10. I had my own small version of "Chestnut blight", "Japanese Beetle", "Pine Borer", etc. Since a large number of plants come from Florida, Louisana and other southern states where various diseases are widespread, it pays to be careful. An example is Oranges. Many areas of the country will not even sell Florida Oranges. They are "native" to California as much as to Florida but you can't take a Florida orange to California. We can't buy Florida oranges here and when I see them in a store in the east they have some sort or warning label. I understand that most individually planted orange trees in Florida have been removed and destroyed. Apple and Pear trees are native to parts or our state but are nearly impossible to grow because of the fire blight. I understand the Hemlock is the next native species being eradicated in Tennessee. Granted, most of the diseased plants are infected by foreign sources but once they hit our shores, they are transported from state to state. See this article in the NYTimes about a recent indident. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/09/nyregion/09trees.html

Last edited by Troyv1; 11-08-2007 at 05:52 PM..
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Old 12-06-2007, 11:16 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
6,994 posts, read 14,131,104 times
Reputation: 5150
Oh wow... sorry to hear about that misfortune. I would be crushed if I had to destroy any plants.

Luckily I have not had any problems from any of my trees. The only "blight" problem I have had has been on my native peach trees that were here before I ever even planted the palm tree.

Some of my other trees that are "out of zone" are still native to the "deep" southeast, so I do not see them causing any issues. The Live Oaks are from Texas and I have a couple of Longleaf pines that are from eastern North Carolina - but we have several other Longleaf pines around here in Bristol that I have seen at other homes, so I do not see them causing any issues either. My Slash pine is from Oklahoma- all were from a nursery - checked out safe and legal to transport from state to state, as was the palm tree I planted, which was a seedling from Florida and raised here in Tennessee.

Better luck with your other plants.
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Old 12-06-2007, 11:34 PM
 
26 posts, read 86,767 times
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Anyone visiting Kingsport should take a drive to the corner of Oak and Yadkin Sts. right behind the Renaissance Center near John Sevier Middle School. Somebody about three years ago brought in an at least 15 ft. Sabal Palmetto and I think three Windmill Palms and planted them around their house. I was quite incredulous that the Palmetto would survive the first winter but it did and has managed to put out leaves each of the following years. The Windmill palms have grown quite nicely and have doubled their size since then. They are about five feet tall now. The homeowners cover the crown of the palmetto during the coldest weather with what looks like a blanket and that seems to do the trick.

I have a rather large grove of Musa basjoo, the hardy Japanese banana growing at my house. I've had them for almost fifteen years and they get enormous each year and grow more vigorously than many tropical species do in more suitable habitat.

Our winters aren't nearly as bad now as they were thirty or more years ago. I remember when knowledgeable nurserymen said you couldn't grow Pampas Grass here, that it would freeze out in the winter. I've had a large clump for over fifteen years. I planted a Brown Turkey Fig at my parents house in the early 80's that has got quite large over the years and has two crops of figs on it. It also wasn't thought to be hardy here or would have to come up from the roots each year.

Last edited by maui4me; 12-06-2007 at 11:36 PM.. Reason: misspelling
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Old 12-07-2007, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
6,994 posts, read 14,131,104 times
Reputation: 5150
Thanks for that info! I will swing by there. I think I have spoke to that person before here on the internet on a tree forum.

Yeah, we have that grass you mentioned as well... had it for years and it has thrived. We cut it back in the spring so all new will grow back, but carefully, because its sharp!

Quote:
Originally Posted by maui4me View Post
Anyone visiting Kingsport should take a drive to the corner of Oak and Yadkin Sts. right behind the Renaissance Center near John Sevier Middle School. Somebody about three years ago brought in an at least 15 ft. Sabal Palmetto and I think three Windmill Palms and planted them around their house. I was quite incredulous that the Palmetto would survive the first winter but it did and has managed to put out leaves each of the following years. The Windmill palms have grown quite nicely and have doubled their size since then. They are about five feet tall now. The homeowners cover the crown of the palmetto during the coldest weather with what looks like a blanket and that seems to do the trick.

I have a rather large grove of Musa basjoo, the hardy Japanese banana growing at my house. I've had them for almost fifteen years and they get enormous each year and grow more vigorously than many tropical species do in more suitable habitat.

Our winters aren't nearly as bad now as they were thirty or more years ago. I remember when knowledgeable nurserymen said you couldn't grow Pampas Grass here, that it would freeze out in the winter. I've had a large clump for over fifteen years. I planted a Brown Turkey Fig at my parents house in the early 80's that has got quite large over the years and has two crops of figs on it. It also wasn't thought to be hardy here or would have to come up from the roots each year.
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Old 12-08-2007, 04:13 PM
 
Location: Southeast Texas
579 posts, read 625,467 times
Reputation: 349
I honestly don't know about growing palm trees in Tennessee as to how well they will do. I would imagine one of the disadvantages to planting non-native plants is that they would require more work since they are not used to that particular climate. They might require more water or more warmth than the new climate could naturally provide for them. Also, there is the possibility they could do very, very well, and without any natural controls, completely go crazy and take over the local area - kudzu and English ivy come to mind here. If it were me, I personally wouldn't plant non-native species for a variety of reasons.

A local nursery or garden expert (County Extension office, maybe?) might be able to help. Also, to avoid trouble later on, you might want to check on the local laws about planting non-native plants - some areas can be quite strict about it because of the potential for damage on the local ecosystem.

I did very much enjoy your pictures!

Blessings,
pnc
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Old 12-09-2007, 07:46 AM
 
Location: Telford, TN
1,065 posts, read 2,546,435 times
Reputation: 330
Default I agree.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe P View Post
After spending 16 years in Tampa if I never see another palm tree that will be perfectly fine with me.
Amen, I'm for passing a law against anything remotely tropical. We have planted two red maples, a birch, and a dogwood in our front yard and six Cleveland pears in our backyard.
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Old 12-11-2007, 06:23 PM
 
Location: Gorgeous NE TN
77 posts, read 164,666 times
Reputation: 31
My yard has mostly native or "near native" plants - things bought at local nurseries that was raised locally. I found, through trial and error, they do better with a whole lot less fussing.

My tropical plants (many) stay in pots - and currently hibernate in the basement (palms, bromeliads, etc). I agree with prior entries about planting non-native plants, but it sounds as if the appropriate steps were taken to be as careful as possible.

It's unfortunate, however, that things like kudzo and wooly adelgids have taken over and destroyed some areas in our region... I planted a few hemlocks this year, and hopefully there will be a "cure" before they get infected. Hemlocks are just such beautiful trees.

Anyone know or hear of some disease or infestation that is rumored to be taking out some of the local white pine? I just bought some to plant; they look healthy right now.
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Old 12-13-2007, 11:42 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
6,994 posts, read 14,131,104 times
Reputation: 5150
Thanks - I am glad you enjoyed the photos..

In regards to the other reply about the laws.... Well, I do not think I have anything that is against "the law", as the palms were purchased at local greenhouses and I am assuming since they are sold here, there is not a problem. Besides, I do not really think it would matter, as I (nor anyone else) would not take kindly to any laws telling me what kind of trees I can plant on my own land, especially since I do not think they are posing any threat. I do not see palm trees getting out of control like kudzu.

I have pine trees that are not native here - like the Longleaf and Slash pines and they are closely related to the Loblolly pine, which IS native here, so I do not see any threats posed. I know where there are other Longleafs planted and have been there for years and I do not see any harm... I mean what harm can a non-native pine tree cause? A pine is a pine in my book.

I do not think many realize that these days, there are millions of trees that are not in their original "native" ranges.. over the years, the climate has changed, as has where certain plants/trees live. Te southern Magnolia is NOT a native to northeast Tennessee, yet you see them everywhere and they have been here for decades. Yes, I have one of those as well that has thrived for the past 16 years we have had it. They are all over Bristol, Johnson City and I have seen several HUGE Magnolias in Kingsport and Elizabethton that have obviously been there for decades and never have posed a threat at all. There are trees that are native to here that grow well south of here that are not native there and no problems have occured. I just think some people do not like the "tropical" look and make up their minds that they do not want to see it here, but this is the southeast and we are now on border zone 7a in the hardiness zones and its time to face the facts that there are some species of trees that would not grow here 20-30 years ago now will survive in this area due to the climate warming and trees are naturally making their way up.

I know someone in Charlotte that has a large Southern Live Oak... they did NOT plant it. They said it just started growing out of nowhere... I am assuming that a seed from just south of there fell off of a truck or something (it started growing near a roadside) and the tree started growing.

I think if the good Lord did not want a tree to grow somewhere then he would not let it live where it was planted.

Ania... I have a question for you... do you have any tropicals that are NOT in pots? Any that are planted in the ground?

Thanks for the comments.
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