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Kingsport - Johnson City - Bristol The Tri-Cities area
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Old 09-07-2008, 07:48 AM
 
20 posts, read 51,134 times
Reputation: 10
Default Probably a very silly question about mountains

My boyfriend and I are looking to move to NE TN in probably 5 years. He's wanted to live in TN since before I met him, and I've always loved the idea too. We will probably try and buy some land adjacent to my grandparents' farm on Buck Mountain. Now, we're from Florida (I know, I know, ANOTHER FL to TN thread... sorry...) and my boyfriend is quite scared of driving on mountain roads. He wanted me to ask all of you amazing city-data people... How often do you hear of people dying from driving off of a mountain? It doesn't help that when my parents were dating they were parked on a dirt road somewheres on Buck Mountain and the side fell out from under them. Luckily the truck wedged up against a tree and no one was hurt, but now my boyfriend thinks that happens to everyone! My dad just claims that it makes for a good story. Anyway, any info you guys could throw my way would be wonderful!
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Old 09-07-2008, 09:38 AM
 
158 posts, read 346,477 times
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I agree with your dad -- just makes for a great story. I ride motorcycles (and sometimes drive a sports car) all over mountains of east TN, western NC, and north Georgia. Pretty much every US route or state highway in the three, I've been on more than once. There are plenty of places you could go over the side and have a nasty fall, sure, but the roads are generally in great shape. There's only a single road in any of the states where I think it could fall off, and that is TN hwy 91 outside of Elizabethon where it goes into the Cherokee National Forest. Parts of it are not only curvy but twist from side-to-side, and there are several places where it's held up by metal retaining walls stuck into the side. At times I've thought it's a real candidate for having the road fall off. But that's it.

I will add a caveat if you ride motorcycles -- watch out for gravel in curves on mountain roads, especially in NC. Both TN and GA seem to keep theirs clean. My mother and father skidded on some gravel while on a motorcycle and went off the side of a mountain, but they weren't hurt. The motorcycle was totalled, though.

Let me add I'm talking only about paved roads -- ones with highway designations. TN has the best-maintained mountain roads I've ever seen. I have no experience with local unimproved roads.

Last edited by tdatl; 09-07-2008 at 09:51 AM..
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Old 09-07-2008, 10:21 AM
 
20 posts, read 51,134 times
Reputation: 10
Haha, well, my grandparents' farm butts up to Cherokee National Forest, so the road you mentioned might very well be one I'd be driving on often. Neither of us ride motorcycles, but my dad did while he lived up there. I'm trying to convince myself that if I have a vehicle with four wheel drive I'll be fine.
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Old 09-07-2008, 02:06 PM
 
158 posts, read 346,477 times
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It's not bad, there's nothing to worry about. I grew up in Boone, NC and Johnson City. As a kid, my family even lived at the very top of Beech Mountain, NC. The road to it is as steep a road as you'll find in the entire region -- check it out next time you're in the area. My family never even owned 4-wheel drive vehicles and never had an issue. My dad drove a Toyota Celica during the 1970s. He kept a pair of chains in the trunk, and that sufficed. And the region got a lot more snow back then than it does now. If a Toyota Celica will do the job, you'll be fine!
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Old 09-13-2008, 02:44 PM
 
Location: Gorgeous NE TN
77 posts, read 159,752 times
Reputation: 31
Smile consider the roads "fun" driving

I grew up in FL, and remember the 1st time I drove over 321 from Boone, NC to Johnson City, TN. I was following friends (locals "comfortable" with the roads) in the dark. I remember holding the steering wheel so tight and thinking the same thoughts.... And I know that's not the curviest road or most mountainous... but for a FL driver...flat land, see for miles, drive in straight lines... it was something to experience.

Now, I LOVE the driving. Obviously, you need to obey the laws of the road (and watch out for debris, other drivers, etc). I find it exciting and each time you drive those roads, you see something new.
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Old 09-13-2008, 08:04 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
6,992 posts, read 13,398,983 times
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Most of the roads in the metro area are not mountainous and twisty despite popular belief.

Very few roads are twisty mountain roads and there are so many trees and gaurd-rails if you were to run off, they will "catch" you. Mainly roads like that are if you are going between the Tri-Cities and into parts of northwestern North Carolina.

As long as one does not go flying through the mountain roads like maniacs, you will be fine.


BTW - no question is too silly. Hope you like it here!
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Old 09-13-2008, 09:29 PM
 
Location: Kenai Peninsula, AK
5,351 posts, read 8,618,026 times
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Yeah, I can't think of any necessary use of mountain roads unless you're going to some places towards the Butler/Mtn City/Shady Valley/Laurel Bloomery area, or of course in WNC. That's because the Tri-Cities aren't built on the side of a mountain, of course the settlement occured in the valley below.
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Old 09-14-2008, 08:05 AM
 
20 posts, read 51,134 times
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Well that's reassuring... kind of. Like I said, we'd probably be living next to my grandparents IN the mountains, maybe 2 miles west of NC? I'd probably be working in Kingsport though, so a majority of my driving wouldn't be in the mountains.
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Old 09-15-2008, 11:49 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
6,992 posts, read 13,398,983 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RachelKay View Post
so a majority of my driving wouldn't be in the mountains.

Oh no, not at all. Most of the roadways are straight as sticks.
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Old 09-22-2008, 05:47 PM
 
Location: Not where I want to be
1,113 posts, read 1,552,639 times
Reputation: 423
What about in the winter when there is ice?
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