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Old 07-13-2010, 05:50 PM
 
207 posts, read 391,593 times
Reputation: 156
Quote:
Originally Posted by J&Em View Post
The extension to the pollution of the Smoky Mountains and the park however is perpetuating the idea that the haze/smog/ozone is all created locally and somehow related to junk cars in the yard. While there is a component of the pollution that can be laid at the feet of vehicles that are nonconforming to California emmisions test (or even for pollution from vehicles traveling in the park with many stops) and to the TVA usage of coal, by far the largest part of the pollution comes from much further away.
Absolutely. I didn't mean to imply that the pollution is due only to local emissions. It is largely geographic misfortune that contributes to the pollution in the Smokies.

My point is simply that pollution in NE TN is a problem. We can either address it or not. We choose not.

Some methods of addressing it could include emissions testing, slightly lower interstate speed limits, political pressure on TVA (and owners of other contributing coal plants) to accelerate plans to install scrubbers / catalytic reduction tech in their coal plants. Certain counties could even agree to a fixed timeline one cent surcharge per kW-hr to offset the costs of upgrading plants. Nuclear plants instead of coal plants could be an option, albeit a politically dicey one. I'm sure others have better ideas.

There have been cases of exerting pressure out of state in order to cut off a flow of pollution (e.g., dioxin dumped into the Pigeon River by a paper mill in NC). (Al Gore sided with the paper mill, incidentally.)

I'm not suggesting that anyone should force anything on East TN. However, we are also not helpless victims, despite our geographic vulnerability. We could act if enough people felt that it was important, but there is not a critical mass of support. It is that sentiment to which I was referring above.

We may as well solve this problem while we can, because it is going to be much easier to deal with than this one:

Tracking Pollution from China to the United States

 
Old 07-13-2010, 06:04 PM
 
Location: Moving to Knoxville someday...
185 posts, read 278,519 times
Reputation: 97
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamblinRoseRanch View Post
But it's THEIR property. It doesn't belong to you, nor do the junk cars. And the twenty years thing is absurd. I'm sure they're equally offended by your perfectly manicured lawns and ugly little garden gnomes.
If you don't like it, move somewhere with a HOA and enjoy your life. When you start paying the mortgage and taxes on your neighbor's property, THEN you get a say.
"But it's THEIR property. It doesn't belong to you, nor do the junk cars."
As long as that property doesn't adversely affect MY property, then there is no problem. But, when their junk pollutes the ground water, becomes a danger to kids in the neighborhood, and/or reduces MY property value, then that land owner needs to do the right thing and take care of the problem. It's called being a good neighbor.

"If you don't like it, move somewhere with a HOA and enjoy your life."

And that's exactly what I did. I bought property in a Powell subdivision that has an HOA. It was the best way to protect my investment.

"When you start paying the mortgage and taxes on your neighbor's property, THEN you get a say."
Oh, I can have my say, and it won't cost me a penny. All it takes to get the wheels in motion on an unkempt property is a phone call or email to the County Health Department. Ask me how I know.

Last edited by dave1961; 07-13-2010 at 07:04 PM..
 
Old 07-13-2010, 08:21 PM
 
Location: Morristown, TN
1,756 posts, read 2,392,122 times
Reputation: 1274
If it endangers the kids in the neighborhood? How does that happen unless the kids are trespassing? I assume we're talking regular household type refuse- be it cars, cans or garbage bags, not toxic waste.

So, they should do the 'right thing' and change THEIR property to make YOU happy? If someone came to you and asked you to tear up your flowers and plant wheat in it's place because they preferred it over roses and it raised their property values based on agricultural monies, would you?

Wow, instead of speaking with the neighbor in person, to ascertain the reason for the problem, you call the health department. Glad i'm not one of your neighbors. And that I live in the country.

I really wonder about people who purchase homes based on the possibility of resale or for investment purposes. Our victorian farmhouse (as well as all our other houses), with its acreage and pool was chosen with our family and our needs in mind and it felt like home. Not because I was planning for a future sale or building my wealth.

I have horses,chickens, cats, dogs and kids on a farm and refuse to change it- my neighbor hates it- guess i'm a bad neighbor, huh?
 
Old 07-13-2010, 08:26 PM
 
68 posts, read 106,551 times
Reputation: 53
This thread has caused alot of concerns to be brought out into the open very quickly. It is true that I don't enjoy seeing disorderly yards.. but the greater concern is the pollution factor in East Tennessee. I had an interesting conversation today with someone from the state EPA. He told me the greatest source of air pollution in the Knoxville area is Interstate 75. While we can't test all vehicles passing through, how about at least testing emissions on vehicles registered in East Tennessee? At least it would be a start and I would be willing to pay the extra fee to have my car tested. And don't forget the radon issue here.. everyone should have their homes tested for radon and if radon is found, try and install a remediation system. It works and could save your life!
 
Old 07-13-2010, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
195 posts, read 282,987 times
Reputation: 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamblinRoseRanch View Post
If it endangers the kids in the neighborhood? How does that happen unless the kids are trespassing? I assume we're talking regular household type refuse- be it cars, cans or garbage bags, not toxic waste.

So, they should do the 'right thing' and change THEIR property to make YOU happy? If someone came to you and asked you to tear up your flowers and plant wheat in it's place because they preferred it over roses and it raised their property values based on agricultural monies, would you?

Wow, instead of speaking with the neighbor in person, to ascertain the reason for the problem, you call the health department. Glad i'm not one of your neighbors. And that I live in the country.

I really wonder about people who purchase homes based on the possibility of resale or for investment purposes. Our victorian farmhouse (as well as all our other houses), with its acreage and pool was chosen with our family and our needs in mind and it felt like home. Not because I was planning for a future sale or building my wealth.

I have horses,chickens, cats, dogs and kids on a farm and refuse to change it- my neighbor hates it- guess i'm a bad neighbor, huh?
Cars (especially old, decrepit, immobile ones) leak things, be it gas, freon, antifreeze, transmission fluid, and anything and everything else. If a car sits for a long period of time, the risk is even higher for the leakage to seep into the ground. This can quite easily affect the water supply, among other things.

Garbage piles can attract diseased rodents and pests to the area. It's not always about aesthetics or simply being annoyed that the neighbors keep their property less than tidy. If you really think about it, it's a matter of public safety.

Kids drink the water, kids play in the creeks and streams... they don't actually have to be trespassing on someone's property to be affected by their mess.
 
Old 07-13-2010, 10:43 PM
 
872 posts, read 1,613,104 times
Reputation: 555
I was in Loudon couple of weeks ago... I didn't really notice all the trash in people's yards... But I did see trash and ugly signs all over town. I don't remember seeing that much of trash when I lived there. Wanna see more trash in Loudon County - worse than Loudon? drive over to Le Noir City and Philadelphia!
 
Old 07-14-2010, 12:02 AM
 
4 posts, read 4,694 times
Reputation: 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by airwair View Post
Cars (especially old, decrepit, immobile ones) leak things, be it gas, freon, antifreeze, transmission fluid, and anything and everything else. If a car sits for a long period of time, the risk is even higher for the leakage to seep into the ground. This can quite easily affect the water supply, among other things.

Garbage piles can attract diseased rodents and pests to the area. It's not always about aesthetics or simply being annoyed that the neighbors keep their property less than tidy. If you really think about it, it's a matter of public safety.

Kids drink the water, kids play in the creeks and streams... they don't actually have to be trespassing on someone's property to be affected by their mess.

You're WAY overstating the possible risks in the futile attempt to try to make a point which can't realistically be made.

Even if we assume that EVERY SINGLE drop of fluid in a car leaked out of it into the ground, it would not reach the ground water. It would barely penetrate a foot of dirt and even then only in a 1-2 foot radius of the vehicle.

You'd have to have literally hundreds of vehicles - each of them fully dumping every drop of completely full tanks/reservoirs in order for your scenario to even be possible - let alone likely.

So enough with the hysterical hyperbole already.

As far as garbage attracting disease-ridden vermin, once again you're being hyperbolic. I have yet to see even a single post or read a single article about there being problems with ANYONE creating that kind of problem. And even if it DID create that level of problem, then there are ALREADY government agencies tasked with dealing with public health hazards which have the power up to, and including, condemning property as uninhabitable.

But that's not what we're talking about here. You're attempting to make the worst sort of reducto ad absurdum argument possible which any person with an ounce of common sense can easily see through.

Your REAL complaint is that you don't like how your neighbor's yard looks, but you can't admit that all it's REALLY about is your own personal desire for a more aesthetically pleasing neighborhood. You just don't want to have to look at that guy's rusted out pick-up truck, or old refrigerator or whatever. You should at least be honest enough to own that rather than make such ridiculous assertions about hazards to the ground water, etc. But that would make you look kind of a snooty jerk, so you can't come right out and just admit that. So this is what we get instead.

Once again, I will reiterate for those who seem to be having reading comprehension problems: if you have such a problem with your neighbor, then act like an adult and work it out. You don't need a tank to kill an ant, no matter how much better it might make you feel to blast a hole 3 feet wide where that ant once stood. Overkill is overkill, and over-the-top responses to minor inconveniences are completely unnecessary.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 04:48 AM
 
Location: Morristown, TN
1,756 posts, read 2,392,122 times
Reputation: 1274
Welcome, Guyssite. Looks like you're gonna fit in well here. :0)
 
Old 07-14-2010, 09:17 AM
 
Location: Deane Hill, Knoxville, Tennessee
21,637 posts, read 31,036,533 times
Reputation: 11703
Quote:
Originally Posted by guyssite View Post
Your REAL complaint is that you don't like how your neighbor's yard looks, but you can't admit that all it's REALLY about is your own personal desire for a more aesthetically pleasing neighborhood. You just don't want to have to look at that guy's rusted out pick-up truck, or old refrigerator or whatever. You should at least be honest enough to own that rather than make such ridiculous assertions about hazards to the ground water, etc. But that would make you look kind of a snooty jerk, so you can't come right out and just admit that. So this is what we get instead.
Actually, she doesn't even live here. She's a native that moved away. Well, maybe Bethel Park doesn't have such things, but PA surely does have trailers and cars on cement blocks. Appalachia runs right through it, too. And, conversely, Knoxville has areas where neighborhoods are pristine. The grass isn't greener and people are more alike than different.
 
Old 07-14-2010, 11:52 AM
 
Location: Moving to Knoxville someday...
185 posts, read 278,519 times
Reputation: 97
Complaint Investigation
The Knox County Code Administration office receives complaints concerning a variety of alleged violations of the adopted codes and ordinances. These complaints involve matters such as surface runoff, drainage, erosion, flooding, dumping, setbacks, dirty lots, blighted properties, junk cars, non-conforming uses, signs, dangerous structures, building without a permit, building contrary to the code, unlicensed builders, fire hazards, life safety, and other concerns of the citizens of Knox County. After a complaint is received, an inspection will be conducted to verify if there is a violation. This inspection will be conducted without prior notice to the responsible party and in a timely manner depending on the severity of the alleged violation. Once on site the inspector will identify him or herself and conduct the inspection. After completing the inspection the inspector will inform the responsible party of any violations found, advise what actions must be taken to correct the violations and set the time frame in which the violations must be corrected. After the allotted time, a re-inspection will be performed to verify compliance or to take further action if the violations still exist. These further actions may include citations to Knox County General Session's court or the issuance of work orders for the cleaning of property or for the demolition of structures.

Let's clean up Knox County.

Email: code.admin@knoxcounty.org

Or mail:
Knox County Code Administration & Inspection
Suite 547 City County Building
400 Main Street
Knoxville, TN 37902

Phone: 865.215.2325

Last edited by dave1961; 07-14-2010 at 01:02 PM..
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