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Las Cruces Dona Ana County
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Old 06-17-2009, 03:59 PM
 
Location: Monterey Bay, California -- watching the sea lions, whales and otters! :D
1,905 posts, read 4,633,932 times
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I noticed that pecans are one of the more popular crops there -- do people have pecan trees in their yards, or is it not practical?

Also, do any citrus fruits grow there? When I lived in Phoenix, there were many lemons, grapefruits and orange groves (before they built over them!). Or is it too high in altitude? Just curious, because I'd love to have a citrus tree.

tecpatl, I love that photo of the Organ Mountains with the moon -- did you take that? Just lovely.

What about the older area of Las Cruces, like Alameda and Bellamah -- are they flood zones, too? I do remember in Phoenix that there was flooding, and being from the northeast, I was so shocked to see streets literally flooding during a rare rainstorm -- they had no sewer drains! It sounds like Las Cruces may be similar -- is that true?

Thanks everyone -- keep it coming!
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Old 06-17-2009, 04:08 PM
 
2,866 posts, read 4,209,783 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
I noticed that pecans are one of the more popular crops there -- do people have pecan trees in their yards, or is it not practical?

Also, do any citrus fruits grow there? When I lived in Phoenix, there were many lemons, grapefruits and orange groves (before they built over them!). Or is it too high in altitude? Just curious, because I'd love to have a citrus tree.
Pecan trees take up a lot of space and are kinda messy, but yes some people have them in their yards. It gets too cold for citrus trees. You might be able to grow a hardy variety in a protected patio with coverage for freezing nights. Most citrus I have seen have been in pots that can be moved indoors.
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Old 06-17-2009, 08:35 PM
 
1,403 posts, read 2,593,531 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
I noticed that pecans are one of the more popular crops there -- do people have pecan trees in their yards, or is it not practical?

Also, do any citrus fruits grow there? When I lived in Phoenix, there were many lemons, grapefruits and orange groves (before they built over them!). Or is it too high in altitude? Just curious, because I'd love to have a citrus tree.

tecpatl, I love that photo of the Organ Mountains with the moon -- did you take that? Just lovely.

What about the older area of Las Cruces, like Alameda and Bellamah -- are they flood zones, too? I do remember in Phoenix that there was flooding, and being from the northeast, I was so shocked to see streets literally flooding during a rare rainstorm -- they had no sewer drains! It sounds like Las Cruces may be similar -- is that true?

Thanks everyone -- keep it coming!
I took the photo...standing across the street from Shorty's on Avenida de Mesilla. It's enlarged quite a bit.
People do have pecans in their yard, even though they are a messy tree. In many cases houses are plopped into pecan groves and only enough trees are removed to accomodate the house. Pecans bring a good price, so them that has em wants to keep em when they can.
It's too cold for citrus in the Mesilla valley. There's a pretty big difference between temps in Tempe and in LC.
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Old 06-18-2009, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
14,156 posts, read 7,314,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisteria View Post
I noticed that pecans are one of the more popular crops there -- do people have pecan trees in their yards, or is it not practical?

Also, do any citrus fruits grow there? When I lived in Phoenix, there were many lemons, grapefruits and orange groves (before they built over them!). Or is it too high in altitude? Just curious, because I'd love to have a citrus tree.

tecpatl, I love that photo of the Organ Mountains with the moon -- did you take that? Just lovely.

What about the older area of Las Cruces, like Alameda and Bellamah -- are they flood zones, too? I do remember in Phoenix that there was flooding, and being from the northeast, I was so shocked to see streets literally flooding during a rare rainstorm -- they had no sewer drains! It sounds like Las Cruces may be similar -- is that true?

Thanks everyone -- keep it coming!
It's similar here - the ground gets so hard that when it does rain, it cannot absorb the water, so it just rushes down the streets. My impression is that it is more of an issue in the newly developed areas than it is in the established areas like Alameda and Bellamah, but I really don't know that for sure.

We don't have sewer drains, but we do have culverts and channels that are supposed to reduce the likelihood of flooding. They do a pretty good job in my development, helped out as they are by the natural slope of the landscape.
As you drive around, you'll see that there are large areas where water collects after storms. These areas will never be developed in anticipation of the 100 year flood that apparently could come at any time.
There is also a major construction project underway on the East Mesa to create a holding pool that will hopefully alleviate the really bad flooding problem out that way.
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Old 06-18-2009, 11:12 AM
 
Location: 38 38' 45" N, -90 20' 08" W
7,646 posts, read 11,510,985 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TigerLily24 View Post
It's similar here - the ground gets so hard that when it does rain, it cannot absorb the water, so it just rushes down the streets. My impression is that it is more of an issue in the newly developed areas than it is in the established areas like Alameda and Bellamah, but I really don't know that for sure.

We don't have sewer drains, but we do have culverts and channels that are supposed to reduce the likelihood of flooding. They do a pretty good job in my development, helped out as they are by the natural slope of the landscape.
As you drive around, you'll see that there are large areas where water collects after storms. These areas will never be developed in anticipation of the 100 year flood that apparently could come at any time.
There is also a major construction project underway on the East Mesa to create a holding pool that will hopefully alleviate the really bad flooding problem out that way.
There are so many new construction areas I fear could be victim if you use the 100 or 500 year floodplain boundary. For instance, you are familiar with the High Range area on Roadrunner. What's the deal with that new development off of Sonoma Springs? Unless you have superior stormwater engineers and planners that can divert runoff, I forsee disaster for that entire new development. You know the one I am talking about?
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Old 06-18-2009, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Home, Home on the Front Range
14,156 posts, read 7,314,579 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike0421 View Post
There are so many new construction areas I fear could be victim if you use the 100 or 500 year floodplain boundary. For instance, you are familiar with the High Range area on Roadrunner. What's the deal with that new development off of Sonoma Springs? Unless you have superior stormwater engineers and planners that can divert runoff, I forsee disaster for that entire new development. You know the one I am talking about?
I agree. I know the exactly one you are talking about. I actually had this very conversation with some folks not too long ago while driving by the construction. I was very surprised that they are building on that side since it is right above the 100-year flood arroyo. The way the landscape is in that area, it doesn't look like there's anywhere else for the water to go except over/through those new apartments
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Old 06-18-2009, 05:13 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
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Is that the new over 55 place?
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Be kinder than necessary for everyone is fighting some kind of battle.
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Old 07-07-2009, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Tucson/So. Cal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tecpatl View Post
It IS a great place...I think everyone feels at home there in some way.
It's a place without cookie-cutter sameness..unplanned, chaotic, yet harmonious at the same time. It says something GENUINE to visitor....
.......
As I walk the ditch roads (the paths alongside the irrigation ditches that bring Rio Grande water into and crisscross thru the village ) near my house I meet cattle grazing in a field of alfalfa, a pen or two of turkeys, sheep, goats, a peacock or two, very vocal guard-geese, a few curious horses, a burro, some furtive housecats, and the usual compliment of yapping dogs. People I don't know wave hello at me, and smile. Another ditch hiker.
All of this in the confines of a historic village where the agri-culture has not gone away or moved offshore. People have tractors and disks and plows parked behind their house. Some, I think, must have every car they've ever owned on display in various states of disrepair. Others, maybe next door, are doing oil paintings or practicing the cello on their patio in the cool morning air, or working on their doctoral thesis or a business deal. The man who discovered Pluto lived not far away..his wife still lives there. My next door neighbor's family came down South from Santa Fe, running from the Pueblo revolt of 1680, and never left. They grew grapes, made and sold wine for over a century, until Prohibition, then turned to cotton, chile and melons.
Fields of onions and pecans in the distance, and the air smells like desert but also like the deep, rich, moist green of field crops. I wave and walk on...feeling so lucky, so at home, to be here, in a real place.
Beautiful post.....this is the ambiance i seek.
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Old 07-19-2009, 05:12 PM
 
Location: Between Mesilla and 'Cruces
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Originally Posted by fruitfarmer View Post
Beautiful post.....this is the ambiance i seek.
Yeah, that is a good description!

Wisteria-

I saw your original post, read a bit, then registered and jumped to the end of this thread so i could post...don't know what, from Page 1-7 you have asked, or have answered...but here goes:

Citrus fruits: Yes. You can grow tomatoes. I'm not wasting the energy to look up if Chile is a fruit or a vegetable, but that can also be subjective/debatable. Chile is a GREAT source of vitamin C.

To answer your question/thread topic...one of my MOST FAVORITE things about Las Cruces: Here in 'Cruces we have a chile processing plant...and when the wind is right, in the downtown/Picacho area, you can smell it (chile) in the air...i can only describe it somewhat akin to the pervasiveness of Ozone after/during a rain...it insinuates itself, not noxious, not overwhelming...simply adding that bit of flavor to the fresh air that makes you aware that you are breathing...reminds me of Gramma cooking a batch...ahhh, nostalgia.

Other goods things about wee 'Cruces:

-Not a huge place...traffic is all right, we have use of a highway/freeway to skip some traffic time (University/Lomador/70/DA).

-We have adequate hospitals, fire, police and EMS.

-Plenty of shopping: hardware stores-both small and corporate, electronic stores/installers, retail clothing and make-up (no, no Sephora's--yet), plenty of vehicle mechanics and retail parts stores, good selection of home furnishings and appliance stores. One rarely has a need to go out of town to procure an item of necessity.

-We are located near an international airport. A 45 minute drive to/from the airport is not bad...by our (NM) reckoning.

-The state college is here. Plenty of fresh minds and ideas...many of them stay, so there is not a brain-drain.

Mind you-i have spent the last week in T-or-C, NM. I have been comparing/contrasting the two, LC and T/C. I grew up in a town somewhat like T/C, spent time on both American coasts, spent time in many NM towns and cities...Las Cruces is Goldilock's median. Not too big, not too small, both in population, culture, ideas, flavor, or political views.

I like nature...who doesn't (an inner city youth?!?!)? Best thing about most of NM...a very short drive and you can be out, away from people, deep in the heart of the sound of silence.

Ryan
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Old 07-24-2009, 06:10 PM
 
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Anyone who thinks other areas might be better, safer, whatever...checkout the threads on City-Data.com fora for cities such as San Diego - often considered to be among 'the best' areas.

Notice how many threads have the title: 'is it safe in....' and 'is it OK to live in...'

That should tell you something.


If you're thinking about even less desirable places checkout this thread from Ohio - you'll wonder why ANYone would want to live there:
"If you're thinking of moving to Cleveland..."
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