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Old 08-26-2010, 01:49 PM
 
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Usually the fresh and newly developed areas are nicer and cleaner and everyone wants to move there and then the older areas start deteriorating, getting dirty, and rough looking and crime rises as shady people replace those who leave.

Did any of moderately priced residential neighborhoods around Las Vegas that are over 20 years old not go downhill in desirability from when it was a new area?
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:09 PM
 
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I was born and raised here (and an ex-realtor) so I remember clear before there was anything on the north or west.......no Summerlin, no Painted Desert, no Desert Shores, absolutely nothing but desert......

What I've found is that most of the 20-30 year old homes did see some deterioration. Neighborhoods like Desert Shores were considered "high end" at the time, just seem like a regular old neighborhood to me now.

Where some places have seemed to maintain a higher end appeal, just in my opinion personally, are places like McNeil Estates, Scotch 80s, Rancho Circle, Rancho Bel Air, and parts of Spanish Oaks. The reason I believe, is that most of these neighborhoods are much older, more like 50 years old. They are guard gated, built on huge lots before grass and water restrictions and most maintain wood burning fireplaces. Their trees and landscape are extremely mature. You have a lot of ranch style/ramblers, spanish style/mission style, and Tudors. These neighborhoods are beautiful to look at and just seem like they'd be in California or something. There are no "cookie cutter" style houses built side by side on tiny lots. It's the way Vegas used to be.

I think 20 year old neighborhoods are just old enough to start looking aged, but not quite old enough to exude charm.
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Old 08-26-2010, 02:27 PM
 
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So, it sounds like you are saying only the custom luxury home neighborhoods managed to stay well maintained over 20+ years? The future doesn't look good for those buying lower end housing in new neighborhoods today.
What is a "nice enough" new area today would be likely to become a bad neighborhood in 20 years.
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Old 08-26-2010, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Somewhere.
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Try The Lakes area. It's been around for about 20 years and still very nice.
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Old 08-26-2010, 04:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PinkString View Post
Try The Lakes area. It's been around for about 20 years and still very nice.
Are there areas around there with 1 bedroom condos that are not converted apartments and mostly restrict sales to owner occupants only?
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Old 08-26-2010, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Somewhere.
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Originally Posted by sdreloc View Post
Are there areas around there with 1 bedroom condos that are not converted apartments and mostly restrict sales to owner occupants only?
Sorry, cannot answer that question. Best to let a realtor help you with that.
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Old 08-27-2010, 11:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sdreloc View Post
So, it sounds like you are saying only the custom luxury home neighborhoods managed to stay well maintained over 20+ years? The future doesn't look good for those buying lower end housing in new neighborhoods today.
What is a "nice enough" new area today would be likely to become a bad neighborhood in 20 years.
Well I don't mean it to sound so pesimistic, they may not turn bad, just lose their appeal. There are places over 20 yrs old on the west side of town, like the other poster said, The Lakes, also Peccole Ranch and older parts of Summerlin, but even all of these aren't as nice as the day they were built. My own neighborhood is ten years old and showing age.

I think you can almost drive through a community and pinpoint the year it was built by looking at it. In the early 1990s when Desert Shores was just going up, all the homes had Spanish tile roofs, like a peachy-toned stucco paint, mostly all stucco homes (I call it the Florida look). Most also had roof mounted air conditioning, lots of palm trees. The trend in the 2000's for example in areas like Southern Highland's, and newer communities were darker stucco paint, stacked-stone trim, slate style roof, somewhat Tuscan look.

I live in a gated community within a larger master plan and though my own neighborhood has faired well due to a strict HOA, the parts right outside have turned for the worst in my eyes. I could have never guessed this ten years ago.....it was an upscale area.

The future could look good for lower end housing depending on the neighborhood. These neighborhoods aren't necessarily over 20 years old, but they seem to maintain their value: Anthem, Seven Hills, Summerlin, etc....Areas that are built with plenty of greenery, trails, strong HOAs, those tend to do better. Random neighborhoods in undefined areas that don't have community support sometimes show their age.
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Old 08-28-2010, 12:24 AM
 
2,038 posts, read 3,648,425 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happyhunting View Post
Well I don't mean it to sound so pesimistic, they may not turn bad, just lose their appeal. There are places over 20 yrs old on the west side of town, like the other poster said, The Lakes, also Peccole Ranch and older parts of Summerlin, but even all of these aren't as nice as the day they were built. My own neighborhood is ten years old and showing age.

I think you can almost drive through a community and pinpoint the year it was built by looking at it. In the early 1990s when Desert Shores was just going up, all the homes had Spanish tile roofs, like a peachy-toned stucco paint, mostly all stucco homes (I call it the Florida look). Most also had roof mounted air conditioning, lots of palm trees. The trend in the 2000's for example in areas like Southern Highland's, and newer communities were darker stucco paint, stacked-stone trim, slate style roof, somewhat Tuscan look.

I live in a gated community within a larger master plan and though my own neighborhood has faired well due to a strict HOA, the parts right outside have turned for the worst in my eyes. I could have never guessed this ten years ago.....it was an upscale area.

The future could look good for lower end housing depending on the neighborhood. These neighborhoods aren't necessarily over 20 years old, but they seem to maintain their value: Anthem, Seven Hills, Summerlin, etc....Areas that are built with plenty of greenery, trails, strong HOAs, those tend to do better. Random neighborhoods in undefined areas that don't have community support sometimes show their age.
Well said.

I have always liked the Legacy Village in Green Valley. They suffer from the pink/peach/white paint scheme, but some of the tiny homes out there had pretty cool floorplans. Most of the neighborhoods that have repainted in earth tones look okay, but they tend to be a little higher end on the price spectrum.

Even some neighborhoods in the Silver Springs area, which started in 1988, look okay after all this time.

I drove through desert shores recently though and I was really disappointed in how it has aged. Same is true for most of Vegas that was built 1988-1995 or so, before the trend towards earth tones. Unfortunately, when that arrived, the streets and lots narrowed and the homes looked more like they were designed by bean counters and not by people who gave even a marginal nod towards design (half round windows, transom windows, complex vaulted ceilings, potshelves, etc). Not that many homes had them, but they were more prevalent back then. There were other setbacks though. At the time, your cabinet options were typically oak or white washed oak. Yuck!

Southwestern was the popular motif. I puke a little bit in my mouth just thinking about it.

Coleman homes used to design a good product before they were purchased by Toll Brothers.

At least white washed cabinets have come and gone. They look absolutely horrible 20 years later.

I wonder how the current trend of granite, laminate wood floors and stainless will be perceived as 10 years from now. In my opinion, its the longest lasting trend I have seen in the Garage Mahals.
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Old 08-28-2010, 12:38 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
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Alta drive jsut west of Rancho is pretty nice. There are even signs that say "Alta Drive, A Historic Las Vegas Neighborhood" the area seems very "Californiaesque" in my opinion. It also reminds me a bit of the historic neighborhoods east of Downtown Orlando

Though for the most part in Las Vegas, old usually equals ghetto. Sad. Buzz123 once said Las Vegas doesn't usually preserve its history, once a bulding reaches a certain age, it will be torn down for something new. That is something cities back east would never do unless the area is going through "gentrification" or redevelopment. In that case, quite a bit of Las Vegas could be redeveloped, there are a lot more ghetto neighborhoods here than I had originally thought when I moved here. They stretch from about Hollywood Blvd in the east to about Decatur, Jones, and in some extreme cases, Rainbow to the west, Cheyenne and Craig to the north, and to about Russell, in some spots

And speaking of old buildings being torn down, I wonder what will be the next casino to get imploded? My money is on either the Sahara, Circus Circus or the Tropicana
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Old 08-28-2010, 12:46 AM
 
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Originally Posted by DavieJ89 View Post
Alta drive jsut west of Rancho is pretty nice. There are even signs that say "Alta Drive, A Historic Las Vegas Neighborhood"
It should say "The Only Historic Las Vegas Neighborhood." Calling it a neighborhood is even a stretch.

Tomiyasu lane between Warm Springs Road and Sunset has some pretty posh pads, but usually you can't really see much past the gates. Some of the surrounding streets and neighborhoods have some neat homes, too.

Sly Stalone, Mike Tyson and a few other celebs had homes on that street...and lets not forget Mr. Danke Schoen himself.
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