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Old 09-11-2010, 08:22 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
16,480 posts, read 20,016,951 times
Reputation: 22407

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To me, no house is a house, without a nice big front porch. I, occasionally,
look at the housing options in the RE section of the newspaper, and it's nice to see some developers are actually going back to front porches, and setting that monstrous, ugly garage in the backyard.
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:41 PM
 
Location: Macao
15,699 posts, read 34,703,311 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
To me, no house is a house, without a nice big front porch. I, occasionally,
look at the housing options in the RE section of the newspaper, and it's nice to see some developers are actually going back to front porches, and setting that monstrous, ugly garage in the backyard.
I could see the point of the porch if there was something to look at. For example, parks, lakes, a street with people traffic, etc.

But, with Las Vegas...where most housing is zoned into residential areas, and not much through traffic. It seems a porch would just face a row of other houses and their driveways.

With Vegas being Vegas...I am actually really into the porches that are within the backyards walls. You can be outside, but not on display from other people's living room windows, etc. Plus you can put anything you want in the backyard as you have privacy - things you put out there, will probably remain out there as well.
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Old 09-11-2010, 08:54 PM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
16,480 posts, read 20,016,951 times
Reputation: 22407
I had an historic house in Phoenix with the nice big front porch. Neighbors would see me out there, reading a book or the newspaper or lounging on my hammock, and they'd come over and say hello and talk. I'd do the same if I saw one of my neighbors sitting on their porches. Very open and friendly. There, the garages were in the back of the houses.

Call me old-fashioned. I find it hard to get on my tiptoes and peer over the cinder block walls to say hello to a neighbor. They might take me for a burglar and shoot me!
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Old 09-11-2010, 09:59 PM
 
3,622 posts, read 4,695,035 times
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Personally I think the prestige of saying I live in an individualistic "custom home" is kind of overrated. If you think about it the custom homes that look closer to a normal average cookie cutter home look nicer than the "individualistic" projects that fit the category, "only a mother/homebuilder" could love. If you don't know what I'm talking about drive around in the rural custom home areas and you see a spattering of weird next to normal next to strange.

So, if you want to go for that, keep in mind those different looking homes are also harder to sell as you have to find someone who has that exact taste. Hopefully someone does! Or, if you plan on living there until you die, I guess that works too.

For the rest of us mindless peons who do live in the cookie cutter developments it's kind of nice knowing everything is cohesive and no-one is going to be building a home that looks like it's a prison guard station, or one that belongs in a forest.
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:03 PM
 
3,622 posts, read 4,695,035 times
Reputation: 4293
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
I had an historic house in Phoenix with the nice big front porch. Neighbors would see me out there, reading a book or the newspaper or lounging on my hammock, and they'd come over and say hello and talk. I'd do the same if I saw one of my neighbors sitting on their porches. Very open and friendly. There, the garages were in the back of the houses.

Call me old-fashioned. I find it hard to get on my tiptoes and peer over the cinder block walls to say hello to a neighbor. They might take me for a burglar and shoot me!
However, in Vegas do you really want to know your neighbors? That way when they have a rockin party with screaming people out in the road it's easier to call the police.
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Tucson for awhile longer
8,874 posts, read 12,925,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
Modern? Built in 1947. That's called mid-century modern I do believe, and there are a lot of those in Las Vegas, but I don't think anyone builds in that old style anymore. I agree that some of them are really nice. You should go downtown and see the Morelli House sometime. Las Vegas: Where Vintage Is Modern : Living Las Vegas

Lots of commercial buildings in that style are still in use around town too. Check out this video: Mid-Century Modern Las Vegas Architecture (unofficial) on Vimeo

Thanks for the link to the video. I've been a fan of Jack LeVine's VeryVintageVegas.com for awhile. If I ever hit a BIG jackpot, you can bet I'd be in Paradise Palms and the Scotch 80s with a contractor in tow the next day.

Those homes certainly are appropriately called "mid-century modern," denoting the time period in which they were built. But architects use the term "modernist" to describe any building stripped of traditional forms, whether it was constructed in 1950 or 2005. Buildings that combine traditional forms in unexpected ways are called post-modernist.

Just as you can still build a "Colonial" or "Victorian" building today (but why would you want to?), "Modern" buildings are still being constructed, just not so much in residential Las Vegas, where the locals seem to prefer the mixture of Neo-Mediterranean and Spanish Revival that for lack of better term gets tagged "California Contemporary" or -- heaven forbid -- "Tuscan."

(Can you tell I used to be Mrs. Architect?)
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Old 09-11-2010, 10:22 PM
 
Location: Jersey City, NJ
638 posts, read 1,906,149 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tiger Beer View Post
Absolutely love the housing styles of Vegas...the southwest look...the often tiled roofs...I'm not sure what 'Meditteranean' is exactly...but the term seems to apply to the housing..maybe 'Spanish' would be another term? Don't know...but something beautiful about it!

How about the rest of you? Seems to be that while some love the look of the housing...others can't stand the stucco, etc. Never understood that, as there is beauty in that as well.

Nontheless, wouldn't mind generating a bit of discussion on this topic of Las Vegas housing styles...your views on it?
I agree with you. I love the look of spanish tile and stucco. BUT its relative to the area. Here in Jersey City its all brick buildings. Some of the brownstones are over a hundred years old and the fresh clean look of a stucco house would stick out like a sore thumb.

There is a random stucco house with spanish tile in my parents neighborhood in Pittsburgh and it works because they have a big yard and the house is set back from the road. They must be way into the desert look because they have some prickly pear cactus and a lot of yucca plants in the yard. I have no idea how that exterior holds up in that kind of climate.

I also love the adobe style homes you find around Santa Fe. It looks a little smoother that stucco. They look like the most cozy little houses. I dig that style too.
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Old 09-12-2010, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Viva Las Vegas
487 posts, read 625,465 times
Reputation: 317
Mod or Trad I love LV
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Old 09-12-2010, 10:46 AM
 
Location: Nebuchadnezzar
968 posts, read 1,771,318 times
Reputation: 345
Around here (washington state), there is an occassional stucco style home, which is very cool. However, imho if all the homes were in the same style, it is not as cool.
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Old 09-12-2010, 03:49 PM
 
579 posts, read 1,019,890 times
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Quote:
All I would like to see is a little more individuality and less of a cookie cutter look.
I agree.

Some good neighborhoods for diversity in style are Kokopelli (the Pueblo/Adobe style with flat roofs are beautiful) also any of the Lamplight neighborhoods, like Lamplight Village, the Manor, The Glens etc.....they include Traditional wood with shutters, Key West Style, Georgian, Tudor, and French Country. They are very unique and each one is a different color.

Also in reference to the front porhces, those Lamplight homes have front porches but they look onto common areas and parks with gazebos.

Souther Highlands has a great Tuscan look.

Some variety can be found, just have to know where to look
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