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Unread 10-14-2010, 10:13 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
112 posts, read 158,543 times
Reputation: 29
Default Preventive Service

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willy702 View Post
Well since you said you have no A/C this isn't surprising. If you have a car with A/C and use it like most people 4 months or so out of the year then most batteries last 2-3 years.

For those who aren't experienced in desert living and battery life, you'll get zero warning. One morning you'll just try to fire up the car and the battery will not budge and it won't take a charge. So yes you can try to get all the life out of it you want, but be prepared for it to happen at the most inconvenient time. Even more amazing you'll find your battery and A/C go out in the middle of winter, when you totally don't expect it.
That is true for those people who go to goofy-lube,or any quick lube for service.If you go to a dealer ,or a good independant and get more then an oil chnage they will (or should) check your charging system and load test your battery.A rule of thumb is if they don't sell batteries (like jiffy-lube),they don't bother to check them,they don't want to sent their customers somewhere else for something they don't carry.You are not saving anything when you are stuck with a dead battery in 110 degrees in the parking lot.Most dealers and good shops will do a free 27 point inspection for free durning a service,and they should carry most common replacement parts.

 
Unread 10-14-2010, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
112 posts, read 158,543 times
Reputation: 29
Default Battery

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
But does it put a drain on the battery to start the car with the A/C on as it does with the lights on?
You should let the charging system stabilize for 30-60 seconds before increasing the load.But it will not in itself kill the battery.
 
Unread 10-14-2010, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
112 posts, read 158,543 times
Reputation: 29
Default Temps

Quote:
Originally Posted by unf0rgiven6262 View Post
The only thing I have noted since moving here is that my car does not perform quite as well in high heat conditions. I suspect this is not just my car as it likely relates to the fact that air is denser in cold temperatures. This allows your engine to pull in more air on a cold day and a lot less on a hot day.
That is 100 percent correct.....
 
Unread 10-14-2010, 10:24 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas
112 posts, read 158,543 times
Reputation: 29
Default Elevation

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
Where did you come from? I'm no mechanic, but could it be a higher altitude here than where you came from? Your car may have been tuned up to perform at a much lower altitude if you come from near sea level, and it may be getting a too rich mixture. ????????????? Just a guess. Las Vegas averages about 2000 feet elevation.
That is only true with an older vehicle with a carb,computer controlled fuel injection compensates for altitude differences....
 
Unread 10-14-2010, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
11,103 posts, read 17,816,980 times
Reputation: 3673
Quote:
Originally Posted by bmac88 View Post
That is only true with an older vehicle with a carb,computer controlled fuel injection compensates for altitude differences....
Knew I'd get called on that when I deleted it from my original question. Also know I'll get called on this statement.

But it's still a mixture of gasoline and air ain't it? And air is "thinner" at higher altitudes as well as in warmer climates too.
 
Unread 10-14-2010, 03:51 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
11,103 posts, read 17,816,980 times
Reputation: 3673
Quote:
Originally Posted by Robustus View Post
Fuel-injected cars (ie, anything built in the last 20+yrs) detect the mass of air coming through the intake, incorporate other inputs such as engine load, throttle position (ie, driver demand), and intake air temperature, and the computer determines the right amount of time to pulse the fuel injectors to get an ideal fuel/air mixture, as well as the correct spark advance for the conditions. There is no "tuning up" for altitude and so-forth. The computer handles it all.
Ah, hah. Got it. Thanks.
 
Unread 10-15-2010, 10:43 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
2,267 posts, read 1,816,436 times
Reputation: 1739
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
Yeah but nobody remembers to turn off the A/C. Also, one of our cars has the always on running lights, and I've wondered about that. Maybe they are automatically switched off until it starts.
Engineers at auto companies spend a bunch of effort to make things easy for car owners. The AC compressor disengages when the engine is being turned over.
 
Unread 10-15-2010, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Paranoid State
2,267 posts, read 1,816,436 times
Reputation: 1739
Quote:
Originally Posted by unf0rgiven6262 View Post
The only thing I have noted since moving here is that my car does not perform quite as well in high heat conditions. I suspect this is not just my car as it likely relates to the fact that air is denser in cold temperatures. This allows your engine to pull in more air on a cold day and a lot less on a hot day.
If your car is a 30-year old classic with a carburetor, then it makes sense that changes in air density can cause a noticeable change in performance (at high altitude, you might even need to have the carbs re-jetted).

For most of us with modern computer-controlled electronic fuel injection, sensors detect air density & temperature & humidity and adjust everything. At least if all the sensors are working correctly. Technically, there is a bit less power at elevation, but it shouldn't be something a mere mortal would notice.
 
Unread 10-15-2010, 01:17 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
2,006 posts, read 1,801,082 times
Reputation: 1542
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
If your car is a 30-year old classic with a carburetor, then it makes sense that changes in air density can cause a noticeable change in performance (at high altitude, you might even need to have the carbs re-jetted).

For most of us with modern computer-controlled electronic fuel injection, sensors detect air density & temperature & humidity and adjust everything. At least if all the sensors are working correctly. Technically, there is a bit less power at elevation, but it shouldn't be something a mere mortal would notice.

I've always been in tune with any car I've driven. I can usually tell when I need to change my oil simply by how the car sounds and idles. My car is only 6 years old and yes there is a significant difference in performance on a 110 degree day vs a cool 76 degree evening. I don't believe it's the sensors as I had them checked and had my spark plugs replaced after my cross country trip last fall. Even if an engine can compensate for changes in air, allowing an engine to get more air will always increase power. This is why people go out of their way to get specialized air filters and air intake systems.
 
Unread 10-15-2010, 01:48 PM
 
776 posts, read 839,733 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by unf0rgiven6262 View Post
I've always been in tune with any car I've driven. I can usually tell when I need to change my oil simply by how the car sounds and idles. My car is only 6 years old and yes there is a significant difference in performance on a 110 degree day vs a cool 76 degree evening. I don't believe it's the sensors as I had them checked and had my spark plugs replaced after my cross country trip last fall. Even if an engine can compensate for changes in air, allowing an engine to get more air will always increase power. This is why people go out of their way to get specialized air filters and air intake systems.

Yeah - I think the point is that if you're driving "normally", you won't notice any power difference due to air-density since you're not really working the car very hard in normal situations anyways. BUT - if you push the vehicle, you'll notice the difference at the extremes, sure.
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