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Old 01-19-2011, 02:35 PM
 
848 posts, read 945,391 times
Reputation: 203
Teachers need to be assesed on the homework they hand out to students. Not on a daily basis but rather on a regular basis. Administrators or principals can see a pattern on the work of a teacher if only they look at the homework materials of the teachers being handed out to the students. Assessment of teachers is the key in improving the education system in the Clark County School District. I have seen the homework of my nephews in the past and all I can say is some of these teachers definitely need more training. I'm not an educator but basing from what I have seen, the homeworks need to be improved.
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Old 01-19-2011, 03:18 PM
 
776 posts, read 928,195 times
Reputation: 413
Quote:
Originally Posted by SportyandMisty View Post
There is a difference between the concept that "no one knows" and "it is inherently unknowable."

I don't disagree that no one knows, but I'm not sure I agree that it is fundamentally unknowable.

Management is hard work. Evaluating employees is hard work. So is managing & evaluating engineers or accountants or marketers, but somehow the private sector manages to do this - more or less.

Private schools, with teachers that are at-will employees, seem to be able to identify their best teachers and their teachers who do not "fit in" with the school and its students. Note that the latter might fit in very well and be great teachers some place else.

At the end of the day, if we truly believe there is no way to tell the difference between a good and bad teacher, what justification do we have to even bother interviewing prospective teachers? Why not just go hire day laborers to teach? I'm being silly, of course, to make my point.

As I think back to my own days in school, I can remember only one or two times over 12 years that someone of authority actually sat in and observed a teacher in action. Imagine only bothering to look at the job an engineer was doing once or twice per year. Silly, of course - so why can't we observe teachers more often - say, every week - as part of trying to get a picture of the job the teacher is doing?

This is all theoretical, of course; we all know it isn't likely to happen any time soon.
+1.

I should note that my parents are both teachers, and I certainly respect the effort required and difficulty of the job, as well the value to society that a truly good teacher brings.

That said, when we're talking about salaries and compensation, we need to break this down to an hourly wage. For teachers, that means accounting for summer vacation, winter break, and the other breaks in-between. I know some will argue that teachers have to prep things at home, correct papers on their own time, etc, etc, but the reality is that just about any job worth having these days has plenty of take-home. It's rare to find someone who has a good job and truly works 9-5, so that argument is a wash. The vacation factor boosts the effective pay by 30-40%. That's non-trivial, and needs to be accounted for prior to any discussion of teacher pay.
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Old 01-20-2011, 01:13 AM
 
18 posts, read 21,679 times
Reputation: 13
Well, I'm finally in the CCSD system as a qualified applicant after about a 2 month process.

If anyone hears of anything regarding job openings, please e-mail me at JTalarico328@Gmail.com. I can teach social studies or english.
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Old 01-20-2011, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
233 posts, read 610,655 times
Reputation: 194
Default It's not about improving education.

If the Governor is talking about doing away with tenure and unions for teachers, it's not really about trying to improve our educational system.

With no tenure system in place, it would be easy to replace an experienced teacher who has earned and reached a higher pay level with a new teacher at a lower pay level.

It's all about saving money, not improving education!

It's political. The Governor got elected by promising not to raise taxes. He needs to make cuts wherever he can to carry out that promise and ensure re-election (his own tenure).
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Old 01-20-2011, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
2,052 posts, read 2,026,197 times
Reputation: 1622
Quote:
Originally Posted by brosati View Post
If the Governor is talking about doing away with tenure and unions for teachers, it's not really about trying to improve our educational system.

With no tenure system in place, it would be easy to replace an experienced teacher who has earned and reached a higher pay level with a new teacher at a lower pay level.

It's all about saving money, not improving education!

It's political. The Governor got elected by promising not to raise taxes. He needs to make cuts wherever he can to carry out that promise and ensure re-election (his own tenure).

In $$ we trust. God was kicked out the door long ago. For some strange reason he's still on our money. I like how the new NLV police chief has a starting salary of about 166k a year. Didn't they lay off about a dozen officers earlier last year up there?
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Old 01-22-2011, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Louisville/Vegas
491 posts, read 649,236 times
Reputation: 351
All Nevada teachers who believe that they are not being treated fairly should move to New Jersey to teach. There's a governor who will treat you properly.
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Old 01-22-2011, 02:22 PM
 
2,038 posts, read 2,355,838 times
Reputation: 3083
Quote:
Originally Posted by brosati View Post
If the Governor is talking about doing away with tenure and unions for teachers, it's not really about trying to improve our educational system.

With no tenure system in place, it would be easy to replace an experienced teacher who has earned and reached a higher pay level with a new teacher at a lower pay level.

It's all about saving money, not improving education!

It's political. The Governor got elected by promising not to raise taxes. He needs to make cuts wherever he can to carry out that promise and ensure re-election (his own tenure).
True. I think all the CCSD cares about is butts in seats. I think that was even quoted by senior school administrator at one time.

The CCEA operates with one hand in the pocket of the district. They do absolutely nothing for teachers. For 12 years, Clark County teachers haven't even seen a decent cost of living raise.

The school wastes ridiculous amounts of money on textbooks because they have adopted a new curriculum. A new curriculum, in and of itself, is not such a bad thing, but the publishing companies make their plea to the districts to purchase yet another NEW curriculum before results are obtained. And then what is the end result? Teachers who are reading from a book, who copy all the other teachers reading from a book. Are all the second grade teachers reading from page 67 on Monday? You bet they are! Teachers have been effectively castrated of their skill sets. They are teaching from a script! The higher functioning kids suffer...the lower kids suffer. The publishing companies make billions. It is a racket!

So how are they supposed to close the gap? How do you raise expectations when teachers are teaching by numbers?

Then....there is the other side of teaching. What is being taught at home?

There is another teacher in the lives of these kids who need to be held accountable. Why not grade the parents? Hypothetically, if it could be proven that a parent didn't take it upon themselves to ensure little Johnny or Susie studies, this puts strain on the teachers. Teachers face an uphill battle as it is. Add ignorant parents to the mix and I wonder how anyone could be such a masochist as to decide to teach in this district?

When should a teacher get paid more? When they have to provide remedial education to under-performing students. Who should pay for these exceptionally talented teachers? The student's parents.

Could you imagine what would happen in a system where parents were actually charged more to send their kids to school if they didn't meet certain standards? You tend to get what you pay for, right?

Of course, this would never work. I realize that. These kind of thoughts would cause an uproar. The mere mention of accountability, at any level, seems to rock the boat. We can't have that now, can we? The poor would suffer....I get that. Still, I would like to see a system of accountability, that hits parents in the pocketbook, in place.

How about a tax deduction for great students?

Ask any teacher how many parents show up to open house. Ask any teacher how many parents actually engage them during the first trimester when they have parent/teacher conferences. You will see that the missing link in education is often the parents.

I work with some people who have children. Some of them are just happy that their child is "passing." Nice.

Way to set the bar!

whew....rant over. Go ahead and throw your stones.
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Old 01-22-2011, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Leaving fabulous Las Vegas, Nevada
1,469 posts, read 3,311,229 times
Reputation: 928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spraynard Kruger View Post


Then....there is the other side of teaching. What is being taught at home?

There is another teacher in the lives of these kids who need to be held accountable. Why not grade the parents? Hypothetically, if it could be proven that a parent didn't take it upon themselves to ensure little Johnny or Susie studies, this puts strain on the teachers. Teachers face an uphill battle as it is. Add ignorant parents to the mix and I wonder how anyone could be such a masochist as to decide to teach in this district?


Could you imagine what would happen in a system where parents were actually charged more to send their kids to school if they didn't meet certain standards? You tend to get what you pay for, right?

How about a tax deduction for great students?

Ask any teacher how many parents show up to open house. Ask any teacher how many parents actually engage them during the first trimester when they have parent/teacher conferences. You will see that the missing link in education is often the parents.
I like your ideas. It would be very cool to have a parent rating right on the report card: showed up for conferences, returned phone calls and emails, signed student agenda, checked grades online, etc.

A tax deduction for students would be way better than just deductions for pushin' out kids. They would have to do a little something to earn it.
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Old 01-22-2011, 02:49 PM
 
2,879 posts, read 3,933,577 times
Reputation: 1083
You make some good points. I'm sure they've burnt a few billion on "technology" too. There is stuff out there that is 100% free that is better than anything, any school district has ever paid big money for. For example, here is a site called HyperGrammar.
It is from the University of Ottawa's Writing Centre. Instead of those often idiotic science books they could be using National Geographic - Inspiring People to Care About the Planet Since 1888 or GoogleEarth.
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Old 01-22-2011, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
270 posts, read 258,886 times
Reputation: 209
Default "time off" please consider

Just wanted to share my story as a teacher. Many point to a short work day and summers off as reasons to reduce teacher salaries. That perspective is outdated from my experience. I have taught for ten years and have never had summers off. Living in NJ, I could never afford not to work year round. I have taught summer school and worked as an admin. assistant each summer. (I do believe school should be year round---but that is another argument altogether.) As an English teacher, I regularly bring home 2-3 hours worth of grading each night (essays). My teaching day begins at 7:20 and ends at 4:15, when I journey home with work in-hand. I also work as a tutor for six hours most Saturdays and three hours on Sunday. I don't mind any of this, just wanted to share in the hope that we might reconsider the dated perception that teachers somehow have a light schedule.

PS: I chose to leave a corporate career to become a teacher and took a 13k pay cut to do so. I was an HR manager and worked about 50 hours per week. I now work about at least 60 hours per week. I'm happy to have traded money and a bit of my time for a career that is much better suited to my talents and interests.
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