U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Nevada > Las Vegas
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-04-2011, 05:32 PM
 
36 posts, read 97,260 times
Reputation: 32

Advertisements

Hello everyone. I made a topic a few months ago about my family looking for a house in Henderson. The good news is that we found a wonderful home and closed in late April (thanks to everyone who gave me advice and encouragement in the original thread!).

Now, while still in the process of moving in, we're already being pestered by the HOA regarding spots of yellow grass in the front yard. I get the feeling this is a means for the HOA - or the city in general - to "persuade" people into installing water efficient rock yards, and now the family is considering it.

To anyone who has switched from grass to rock or knows about the process: approximately how much would it cost to do an "average" sized front yard. I know the city is willing to subsidize home owners some amount per square foot, but I'm thinking the final cost could still climb up there. Also, to those who have had rock lawns installed, approximately how much do you save in water? Thanks much!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-04-2011, 06:08 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
11,553 posts, read 20,476,787 times
Reputation: 4149
I'd bet most of us in Las Vegas have "rock landscaping" now. We even have a name for it ─ Xeriscaping, although it is most commonly referred to around here as desert landscaping.

The Southern Nevada Water District calls it Water Smart landscaping. You'll save a lot of water, but since our water bills are not all that high in the first place, it won't amount to a lot in terms of money. Most of us lazy Las Vegans think about it in terms of low maintenance, but I have a feeling that if people didn't do it voluntarily they'd force us to eventually. I think this will tell you how much they'll contribute, if anything, to replacing the grass. Water Smart Landscapes Rebate for Businesses

Here are some places you can go to look at for ideas.
Gardens Around the Valley

You might consider doing some or all of the work yourself. It ain't Rocket surgery. I've done a lot of it in my younger days when I didn't have any health issues. My wife and I have had landscapers put in new, then make changes, about four or five times at two homes. We've had several of the big companies give us estimates for as much as $10,000 or $12,000, then find a perfectly good person to do it for $2,000. I think our biggest and most expensive project was for about $3,000 + or - a few hundred bucks, but that guy retired and sold his business about a year ago.

If it's is just a front yard, of course it depends on how big it is, and how many plants you need, but I'd think you could get it done for under $2,000. Obviously your sprinkler system is already in.

Don't forget that you'll more than likely have to submit a drawing of your plan to the HOA Architectural Committee. In our HOA you need to get a form from the committee to fill out and get signatures from the neighbors on both sides and directly across the street. Then the committee has to approve it before you do anything or they can make you take it all out and start over. I'm on the committee and we've never done that, but we have turned down things people wanted to do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2011, 07:15 PM
 
36 posts, read 97,260 times
Reputation: 32
Very insightful post, Buzz. Thank you!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2011, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
2,580 posts, read 4,358,406 times
Reputation: 1503
I've converted my front yard, and the back is being done this month. Figure on about $4/sq foot for something decent. In the back I'm doing about 1700 square feet and the cost is $7k. The front was about 1400 square feet and cost $5500. This includes stuff like flagstone paths, pavers, and a lot of demolition (in the back) so you could go cheaper. My landscaper said the lowest he could have done the front yard for was about $3500 but it would have been very plain. The turf rebate is $1.50/square foot, so you might want to get your lawn healthy before the inspection so you get full credit for all the turf you take out.

Buzz is old and is a fountain of bad advice. When you convert to xeriscape you never want to reuse any of your old sprinklers. Drip and turf irrigation use totally different materials, and the valves aren't even the same - a turf valve often won't shut off reliably with the low flow of a drip system. They have special low flow valves just for drip. Also, if your landscaper is reputable and warrants the installation, he won't want to guarantee the work that somebody else performed, so he won't reuse any of the old system. When they did my front yard they cut out the four valve manifold and just tossed it.

I used to put over 1000 gallons of water a day into my yard during the summer months when I had grass. I barely even notice the water I use to drip irrigate now, probably less than 100 gallons per day in the summer. My summer water bills went from around $120 to $30.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2011, 11:14 PM
 
412 posts, read 470,404 times
Reputation: 156
Here is a story about it.


YouTube - ‪NYTimes.com - Las Vegas' Changing landscape‬‏
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-04-2011, 11:24 PM
 
Location: NW Las Vegas - Lone Mountain
15,756 posts, read 21,039,425 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by MediocreButArrogant View Post
I've converted my front yard, and the back is being done this month. Figure on about $4/sq foot for something decent. In the back I'm doing about 1700 square feet and the cost is $7k. The front was about 1400 square feet and cost $5500. This includes stuff like flagstone paths, pavers, and a lot of demolition (in the back) so you could go cheaper. My landscaper said the lowest he could have done the front yard for was about $3500 but it would have been very plain. The turf rebate is $1.50/square foot, so you might want to get your lawn healthy before the inspection so you get full credit for all the turf you take out.

Buzz is old and is a fountain of bad advice. When you convert to xeriscape you never want to reuse any of your old sprinklers. Drip and turf irrigation use totally different materials, and the valves aren't even the same - a turf valve often won't shut off reliably with the low flow of a drip system. They have special low flow valves just for drip. Also, if your landscaper is reputable and warrants the installation, he won't want to guarantee the work that somebody else performed, so he won't reuse any of the old system. When they did my front yard they cut out the four valve manifold and just tossed it.

I used to put over 1000 gallons of water a day into my yard during the summer months when I had grass. I barely even notice the water I use to drip irrigate now, probably less than 100 gallons per day in the summer. My summer water bills went from around $120 to $30.
MBA is also full of not quite right advice. I run a relatively fancy landscaping system with about 14 runs. I run only one true xeriscape run though I do use modified xeriscaping on some runs. The one big xeriscaped run probably has 100 emitters on it. Sections have to be rebuiilt periodcially though mostly it works pretty well.

the system is over 20 years old so virtually every emitter and sprinkler head has been replaced including some portions of the tubing.

I have however converted some segments of popup sprinkler to direct watering. you have to be careful what you use on these runs as you need much higher flows from the emitters...the timing is for the sprinkler system not the longer xeriscape times. But you can find the required emitters if you work at it. And if that does not work you use 4 emitters per plant instead of one.

I am still working at it and have a couple of places where I think I have leaks or too much water. But you chase it week by week and straighten it out.

I will be pleased if I can keep my usage to 1000 or even 1500 gallons per day in the high heat. But I spend $50 per month. Wells have their advantages.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2011, 01:45 AM
 
1,396 posts, read 1,320,567 times
Reputation: 964
Here's what I would do. I just re-did mine. No need for me to say how much since I do my own flagstone.

First step is get some quotes. Have some companies come out and design you a yard. This cost nothing at all, you'll get some good offer and you'll learn a lot more than you do now after talking shop with the pros. Also they will give you some great design ideas you can use.

Then you go to Star Nursery and price all the plants and supplies. This will show you how badly they are ripping you off. Buy all the stuff yourself and find someone who knows how to install it. There are always friendly chaps outside Star Nusery willing to help if they don't know how to do it they usually call a friend who does. You can ask them if they have a friend with a truck or whatever. If that makes you nervous let me know and I'll refer you to a guy. The company you hire is going to hire the same guys I hire just cut out the middle man.

I think it's funny looking at all my neighbors yards with their retaining walls out of level. LoL some of them even hired "professionals"

This guy quotes me 2k for a flagstone pathway. I went and did the same flagstone pathway myself for less than 500.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2011, 12:32 PM
 
2,879 posts, read 4,177,415 times
Reputation: 1095
Tips and Tricks
20 to 30 cents per square foot for the rock. One ton covers 100 sf of 1" rock, 110 sf of 1/2" rock, and 150-160 square foot of minus grade. I would avoid the over kill on the sprinkler systems. The number one cause of citrus tree death in Arizona is over watering.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2011, 12:54 PM
 
Location: NW Las Vegas - Lone Mountain
15,756 posts, read 21,039,425 times
Reputation: 2661
If I remember correctly you have to have your plans approved by LVVWD before you do the conversion if you wish to collect the $1.50...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-05-2011, 01:04 PM
 
2,879 posts, read 4,177,415 times
Reputation: 1095
Some HOAs won't allow the black plastic, underneath.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $84,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Nevada > Las Vegas

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top