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Old 12-11-2012, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Bangkok, NYC, and LV
2,037 posts, read 2,450,198 times
Reputation: 1128

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
Let's see? The population is aging, and the baby boomers are starting to retire. If you're retiring, money counts, but employment not so much. On that basis, Vegas doesn't look so bad (especially if you coming from SoCal, and want to be within driving range.)

Also, more and more people can work via computer/smartphone/internet, and don't need to drive to and sit in an employer's office. On that basis, Vegas doesn't look so bad either. I work at our office. A guy I work with moved to TX and kept his job. Don't think I haven't given that a thought.
What are all of these telecommute ultra flexible jobs that people speak of? What percent of jobs allow for this? 5-10%

I can see how Vegas can be an attractive place for retirees and telecommuters though.
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Old 12-11-2012, 09:12 PM
 
9,953 posts, read 8,441,593 times
Reputation: 5826
I do corporate IT. We have a few people doing this. A aforementioned guy in TX. We have people in Maine. There's a guy who nominally sits behind me, actually lives and works out of CO.

A few people have left. Most of these are going to be working from home (as employees.). Companies don't seem to feel the need to pay for office space.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Datafeed View Post
What are all of these telecommute ultra flexible jobs that people speak of? What percent of jobs allow for this? 5-10%

I can see how Vegas can be an attractive place for retirees and telecommuters though.
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Old 12-11-2012, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Lancaster, CA / Henderson, NV
1,105 posts, read 1,102,454 times
Reputation: 1029
Why I no longer live in California:
  • Bought this little house in Henderson as a 2nd home/vacation home near the first of this year.
  • Both the wifey and I worked at the time for Ca. Govt entities. Me for The City of Pasadena and the wifey for Los Angeles County. Both good paying jobs with great benefits, but the writing is on the wall for many in Ca. Govt and we decided we had all of our eggs in 1 basket. Since she has more years towards retirement than I in govt, and my skill set would transfer better to the private sector, we decided that I should get employment outside of govt.
  • We decided that there were more opportunities with better pay for me here in S. Nev than in S. Cal so I started looking for work here.
    I applied for 2 jobs and ultimately got offers from both and I decided on 1. Though my base pay was only a couple grand higher than I was making in Pasadena, the reduction in taxes and cost of living ultimately made it a nearly 40% increase in what I was able to realize.
  • Recently I determined that the job I took just was not for me so I started looking for new work here. I discovered that the Silicon Valley Tech company that I LOVE the most just recently opened up shop here so I applied. I got the job. Again, just a couple of grand base salary than I was making at the job before this but with stock and bonuses etc, along with the reduced taxes and cheaper cost of living than CA, I am now at about 75% more than I was realizing in California.
That pretty much sums it up!
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Old 12-11-2012, 10:40 PM
 
3,574 posts, read 4,014,298 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Datafeed View Post
What are all of these telecommute ultra flexible jobs that people speak of? What percent of jobs allow for this? 5-10%

I can see how Vegas can be an attractive place for retirees and telecommuters though.
One of my best friends is in IT and was able to actually move to Cortona, Italy (Tuscany) while "officially" working from Orange County, CA. He works nights, but he was always a major night owl anyway, so it works for him. With fewer distractions, his customers actually say he gives better, more responsive service since he moved out of the country. He couldn't be happier and has been doing it for years now.
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Old 12-11-2012, 11:41 PM
 
Location: The North
4,962 posts, read 8,677,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newopty View Post
I realize there is a net gain for Nevada but I am surprised how many people moved from Nevada to California.
I'm sure a majority of them were people who moved back after trying out Nevada. My guess is at least half of the people who make the move go back within a few years. Cost of living is a nice draw on paper, but it doesn't often buy happiness.
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Old 12-12-2012, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Bangkok, NYC, and LV
2,037 posts, read 2,450,198 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
I do corporate IT. We have a few people doing this. A aforementioned guy in TX. We have people in Maine. There's a guy who nominally sits behind me, actually lives and works out of CO.

A few people have left. Most of these are going to be working from home (as employees.). Companies don't seem to feel the need to pay for office space.
So this geographic flexibility is limited to established IT professionals? Again, a very small % of the workforce.
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Old 12-12-2012, 06:09 AM
 
Location: Henderson
1,107 posts, read 1,338,785 times
Reputation: 1017
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
Let's see? The population is aging, and the baby boomers are starting to retire. If you're retiring, money counts, but employment not so much. On that basis, Vegas doesn't look so bad (especially if you coming from SoCal, and want to be within driving range.)

Also, more and more people can work via computer/smartphone/internet, and don't need to drive to and sit in an employer's office. On that basis, Vegas doesn't look so bad either. I work at our office. A guy I work with moved to TX and kept his job. Don't think I haven't given that a thought.
This is the case for us. Too expensive to retire in California but we still want to be within a reasonable driving distance.
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Old 12-12-2012, 08:55 AM
 
9,953 posts, read 8,441,593 times
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It tends to be available for IT people. It's certainly not limit to them. There are a number, and an increasing number, of professions that now don't need geographic proximity.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Datafeed View Post
So this geographic flexibility is limited to established IT professionals? Again, a very small % of the workforce.
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Old 12-12-2012, 08:58 AM
 
9,953 posts, read 8,441,593 times
Reputation: 5826
I have a feeling this is more an employment related phenominon. The Vegas economy went into the tank, moreso than Socal's. People who move to Vegas, and either got and lost jobs, or never got them in the first place, were forced to move back to look for work. There's been a pretty wholesale decimation of the building trades in Vegas, a lot of those workers left to find work elsewhere.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Willy702 View Post
I'm sure a majority of them were people who moved back after trying out Nevada. My guess is at least half of the people who make the move go back within a few years. Cost of living is a nice draw on paper, but it doesn't often buy happiness.
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Old 12-12-2012, 09:21 PM
 
Location: The North
4,962 posts, read 8,677,165 times
Reputation: 3831
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
I have a feeling this is more an employment related phenominon. The Vegas economy went into the tank, moreso than Socal's. People who move to Vegas, and either got and lost jobs, or never got them in the first place, were forced to move back to look for work. There's been a pretty wholesale decimation of the building trades in Vegas, a lot of those workers left to find work elsewhere.
I doubt it. California is nearly as bad for building trades and almost every other kind of field outside IT. The economic refugees mostly go to Texas and Arizona. The lesser skilled just looking for any kind of work go to places like the Dakotas.

California has always been the main supply of new residents and the main destination for those leaving. You either make it a couple of years and stay or you give it up and head back. Everyone who has been around a Vegas workplace more than a few years has seen plenty of this situation play out.
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