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Old 01-07-2013, 07:10 PM
 
13,472 posts, read 9,593,751 times
Reputation: 17430

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
I generally go to Terrible Herbst for convenience, but check those coupons and find the cheapest one. It only takes few minutes and they all do the same thing.

Some places also honor competitor's coupons. Not sure if Terrible Herbst does.
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Old 01-07-2013, 07:11 PM
 
633 posts, read 860,328 times
Reputation: 837
A difference in testing occurs if your car is '95 or earlier or '96 - newer. For pre-'96 they test by using a sniffer in the tailpipe. For '96+ they simply hook into the ALDL connector found under the dash of every car build after '96 (as part of OBDII compliance mandated by the NHTSA) and connect with the car's computer to verify there are no issues. My understanding is that all test stations have to be equipped to test both pre '96 and post '96 cars.

In both cases if your check engine light is on it's an automatic fail.

In both cases they will take a look under your hood and visually verify that all factory emissions equipment is present and slide a mirror under the car to verify all the catalytic converters are present. My '93 Corvette passed the sniffer test with flying colors but, failed the visual test as one of the small emissions hoses in the smog pump system had become brittle and cracked. The kid was very apologetic but said I had to hook it back up and come back and re-test. Can't blame him for doing his job but it was a bit of a hassle.

Some stations are certified to test and repair while others (most) are only certified to test. A friend of mine who owns an investment grade 1975 BMW had recently moved to LV and had issues passing as her CO levels (Carbon Monoxide levels) were too high. This particular car has the Kugelfische mechanical fuel injection system that is very, very finicky and tricky to work on. The only way to adjust the levels of CO is real time while watching the CO levels as the car is running. She was ready to send the car to Salt Lake City to have the system adjusted when I found a station certified to both test and repair. Upon explaining the situation agreed to allow me to perform the adjustments during the test. Took all of 10 minutes. This was a very rare case though.

I have *heard* that our test is not as strict at California but, I don't know if this is actually true or not.
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Old 01-07-2013, 07:18 PM
 
2,702 posts, read 3,434,261 times
Reputation: 4514
Quote:
Originally Posted by newopty View Post
I recently moved here from California. I just took my car to the most reasonable smog location. The DMV has a very good website with instructions for new residents. Here is a link:

Nevada DMV New Resident Guide
Thank you...
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Old 01-07-2013, 07:25 PM
 
2,702 posts, read 3,434,261 times
Reputation: 4514
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtvette View Post
A difference in testing occurs if your car is '95 or earlier or '96 - newer. For pre-'96 they test by using a sniffer in the tailpipe. For '96+ they simply hook into the ALDL connector found under the dash of every car build after '96 (as part of OBDII compliance mandated by the NHTSA) and connect with the car's computer to verify there are no issues. My understanding is that all test stations have to be equipped to test both pre '96 and post '96 cars.

In both cases if your check engine light is on it's an automatic fail.

In both cases they will take a look under your hood and visually verify that all factory emissions equipment is present and slide a mirror under the car to verify all the catalytic converters are present. My '93 Corvette passed the sniffer test with flying colors but, failed the visual test as one of the small emissions hoses in the smog pump system had become brittle and cracked. The kid was very apologetic but said I had to hook it back up and come back and re-test. Can't blame him for doing his job but it was a bit of a hassle.

Some stations are certified to test and repair while others (most) are only certified to test. A friend of mine who owns an investment grade 1975 BMW had recently moved to LV and had issues passing as her CO levels (Carbon Monoxide levels) were too high. This particular car has the Kugelfische mechanical fuel injection system that is very, very finicky and tricky to work on. The only way to adjust the levels of CO is real time while watching the CO levels as the car is running. She was ready to send the car to Salt Lake City to have the system adjusted when I found a station certified to both test and repair. Upon explaining the situation agreed to allow me to perform the adjustments during the test. Took all of 10 minutes. This was a very rare case though.

I have *heard* that our test is not as strict at California but, I don't know if this is actually true or not.
I really hate the visual inspection crap.. IMO if my smog passes the test a visual is just another way for them to keep control over you.... Check engine lights are total crap and if it is on that does NOT mean it is directly a smog problem.. There are even a few manufacturers of autos that are planning on doing away with them in the next couple years..... cause they are a complete load of tripe...
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Old 01-07-2013, 07:49 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, NV
2,721 posts, read 7,473,063 times
Reputation: 1063
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtvette View Post
A difference in testing occurs if your car is '95 or earlier or '96 - newer. For pre-'96 they test by using a sniffer in the tailpipe. For '96+ they simply hook into the ALDL connector found under the dash of every car build after '96 (as part of OBDII compliance mandated by the NHTSA) and connect with the car's computer to verify there are no issues. My understanding is that all test stations have to be equipped to test both pre '96 and post '96 cars.

In both cases if your check engine light is on it's an automatic fail.

In both cases they will take a look under your hood and visually verify that all factory emissions equipment is present and slide a mirror under the car to verify all the catalytic converters are present. My '93 Corvette passed the sniffer test with flying colors but, failed the visual test as one of the small emissions hoses in the smog pump system had become brittle and cracked. The kid was very apologetic but said I had to hook it back up and come back and re-test. Can't blame him for doing his job but it was a bit of a hassle.

Some stations are certified to test and repair while others (most) are only certified to test. A friend of mine who owns an investment grade 1975 BMW had recently moved to LV and had issues passing as her CO levels (Carbon Monoxide levels) were too high. This particular car has the Kugelfische mechanical fuel injection system that is very, very finicky and tricky to work on. The only way to adjust the levels of CO is real time while watching the CO levels as the car is running. She was ready to send the car to Salt Lake City to have the system adjusted when I found a station certified to both test and repair. Upon explaining the situation agreed to allow me to perform the adjustments during the test. Took all of 10 minutes. This was a very rare case though.

I have *heard* that our test is not as strict at California but, I don't know if this is actually true or not.
I think smoggiest CA counties that have strict laws due to already bad air would probably have a dyno setup for some cars to pass smog. I think Clark County and Washoe are probably the only counties that do smog in NV.
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Old 01-07-2013, 10:15 PM
 
518 posts, read 596,112 times
Reputation: 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by vtvette View Post
A difference in testing occurs if your car is '95 or earlier or '96 - newer. For pre-'96 they test by using a sniffer in the tailpipe. For '96+ they simply hook into the ALDL connector found under the dash of every car build after '96 (as part of OBDII compliance mandated by the NHTSA) and connect with the car's computer to verify there are no issues. My understanding is that all test stations have to be equipped to test both pre '96 and post '96 cars.

In both cases if your check engine light is on it's an automatic fail.

In both cases they will take a look under your hood and visually verify that all factory emissions equipment is present and slide a mirror under the car to verify all the catalytic converters are present. My '93 Corvette passed the sniffer test with flying colors but, failed the visual test as one of the small emissions hoses in the smog pump system had become brittle and cracked. The kid was very apologetic but said I had to hook it back up and come back and re-test. Can't blame him for doing his job but it was a bit of a hassle.

Some stations are certified to test and repair while others (most) are only certified to test. A friend of mine who owns an investment grade 1975 BMW had recently moved to LV and had issues passing as her CO levels (Carbon Monoxide levels) were too high. This particular car has the Kugelfische mechanical fuel injection system that is very, very finicky and tricky to work on. The only way to adjust the levels of CO is real time while watching the CO levels as the car is running. She was ready to send the car to Salt Lake City to have the system adjusted when I found a station certified to both test and repair. Upon explaining the situation agreed to allow me to perform the adjustments during the test. Took all of 10 minutes. This was a very rare case though.

I have *heard* that our test is not as strict at California but, I don't know if this is actually true or not.
How is the visual test performed for the the view UNDER the car ? My car passes OBDII in previous State but never had a visual done. Do they really walk aroun the car with a long hand mirror and look at the entire underbody ? Thanks.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:10 AM
 
633 posts, read 860,328 times
Reputation: 837
Quote:
Originally Posted by Onlyliveonce View Post
How is the visual test performed for the the view UNDER the car ? My car passes OBDII in previous State but never had a visual done. Do they really walk aroun the car with a long hand mirror and look at the entire underbody ? Thanks.
They use a mirror attached to a pole to visually identify that the catalytic converters are present. That's all they seem to look for underneath.
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Old 01-08-2013, 12:24 AM
 
633 posts, read 860,328 times
Reputation: 837
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCalCpl2 View Post
I really hate the visual inspection crap.. IMO if my smog passes the test a visual is just another way for them to keep control over you.... Check engine lights are total crap and if it is on that does NOT mean it is directly a smog problem.. There are even a few manufacturers of autos that are planning on doing away with them in the next couple years..... cause they are a complete load of tripe...
Yeah that gets me to.

The only reasoning I can come up with is that sometimes you can pass a smog test in a vehicle that might normally fail by getting the converter as warm as possible before testing. Driving around for :30 to :45 min will get the converter nice and warm and it will function that much more efficiently. It's always a good idea to make sure your car is up to full operating temp before smogging as emissions systems are generally designed to work most efficiently in Closed Loop (engine at full operating temp, when adjustments are made to the air/fuel ratio based on input from various sensors). When the car is in Open Loop (when the engine is still cold and/or warming up) the engine is running on base line parameters within the ECU and the engine is not operating at max efficiency - IE it is likely running a bit rich. The older the car the more susceptible the smog system is to operating temperature.

This is why my 1993 Corvette was able to pass the sniffer with flying colors even though the smog pump was not functioning due to a broken vacuum line - the smog pump recirculates unburned exhaust gasses when the engine is cold. When the engine is at normal operating temp and in closed loop the smog pump is not necessary to achieve favorable emissions numbers.

This may be why a visual inspection is necessary in addition to the other tests performed.
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Old 01-08-2013, 07:23 PM
 
126 posts, read 132,532 times
Reputation: 88
Default Update

First, thank you all for the information.

I went to smogbusters mainly due to convenience because it's on the way to the dreaded DMV here in Henderson. It was a non event. However, I had to shake my head because they charge you an extra $1.00 for using a debit card and he actually had the brashness to have a sign stating "Be sure to tip". Puhleeeze. Anyway, I double checked the DMV website and took my passport, Social Security card and tools to remove and replace my tags on my pickup along with my proof of insurance.
The smog test was $24.00 total. The freaking tags (along with the new drivers license which is mailed within 10 days) was $303.00 *thud*. Overall, I guess the experience was somewhat painless excluding the financial rape/violation.
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