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Old 04-21-2013, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
12,686 posts, read 30,964,098 times
Reputation: 5358

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Exaday View Post
So I've started a new zen hobby, landscaping and gardening. I try to go over to the gardening forum but find that they don't really know so much.

Anyhow, just curious if there are any aficionado on here that know a thing or two. I myself am just a padawan learner. I would sort of like to use plants that are more native to the area since they would clearly do the best in this climate.

Not liking the Lllantanas though.

What do you guys have around the pools?

I don't completely mind going out of region, as long as it will deal with both the drought and the cold winters. Anyone else like working on their yard? I have some ambitious plans. Went out to the Springs preserve for a class from the SNWA. It was great.
Most of the plants that you see around here are not native. There aren't that many native plants in the Mojave that are used for landscaping. I'd guess most of them come from the Sonoran Desert of Arizona and northern Mexico.

You did good by going to the Springs. Did you happen to but Lynn Mills book on desert gardening? He may be the only local master gardener that has a book on Las Vegas landscaping. He and Dick Post of Reno collaborated on it. Nevada Gardener's Guide, by Linn Mills and Dick Post. You'll find them at local garden shops too. You might run into Linn at the Springs and ask him to autograph your copy.
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Old 04-22-2013, 03:11 AM
 
2,438 posts, read 2,499,736 times
Reputation: 1315
Quote:
Originally Posted by NLVgal View Post
Plant World. Charleston and Jones. You won't regret the trip.

Lantana is actually very popular here because it is tough to kill. I have bouganvalia (sp?) around the pool, but my passion is more for edibles. If you like green that just won't quit, grow herbs. Rosemary and Lavender do well here and draw the hummingbirds.

If you want to grow food, check out the tomato lady Sweet Tomato Test Garden - For Desert Gardening. The Real Scoop on Growing Big Tomatoes In The Heat!

[b]As far as actual xeriscaping, good luck with that. We grow weeds, criminals, and politicians here, not flowers.[/]

I have Rosemary and Lavender at home, great plants and if you hate cats using your yard as a litter box, both plants repel cats. I have plenty of these plants at home. Lantanas are messy and not really great near the pool area but beautiful plants, I have a few planted at home and they are like weeds that grow back year after year no matter how much you chop off.

I would suggest succulents near the pool area, like Aloe Vera and Blue Stick. Not messy at all. Red Yuccas are great as well.

For the OP stay away from Cassia and Texas Ranger, nice plants with beautiful flowers but very messy.
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:46 AM
 
13,472 posts, read 9,593,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clarkcty View Post
I have Rosemary and Lavender at home, great plants and if you hate cats using your yard as a litter box, both plants repel cats. I have plenty of these plants at home. Lantanas are messy and not really great near the pool area but beautiful plants, I have a few planted at home and they are like weeds that grow back year after year no matter how much you chop off.

I would suggest succulents near the pool area, like Aloe Vera and Blue Stick. Not messy at all. Red Yuccas are great as well.

For the OP stay away from Cassia and Texas Ranger, nice plants with beautiful flowers but very messy.
I love succulents. I saw an article in Sunset magazine where a guy had used various varieties to create a scene reminiscent of a coral reef. It was very pretty, and I was thinking of emulating it in my backyard.

I haven't had any trouble with my pool getting leaves in it, except for my eucalyptus tree. I really hate that tree. I also have a Palo Verde that can be pretty messy with the yellow flowers and needles, but that's in the front yard.

One flower that I've found to be surprisingly hardy out here is the Martha Washington Geranium. They are hard to find, though. All the garden centers around here seem to have is zonal geraniums which will be dead by August. They can't take the heat.

Anyway, OP, good luck with your gardening adventures and post some pics when you have the time.
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Old 04-23-2013, 02:14 AM
 
2,438 posts, read 2,499,736 times
Reputation: 1315
Quote:
Originally Posted by NLVgal View Post
I love succulents. I saw an article in Sunset magazine where a guy had used various varieties to create a scene reminiscent of a coral reef. It was very pretty, and I was thinking of emulating it in my backyard.

I haven't had any trouble with my pool getting leaves in it, except for my eucalyptus tree. I really hate that tree. I also have a Palo Verde that can be pretty messy with the yellow flowers and needles, but that's in the front yard.

One flower that I've found to be surprisingly hardy out here is the Martha Washington Geranium. They are hard to find, though. All the garden centers around here seem to have is zonal geraniums which will be dead by August. They can't take the heat.

Anyway, OP, good luck with your gardening adventures and post some pics when you have the time.

Succulents are easy to take care off and can multiply fast. It can add color to your front or backyard with the different flowers blooming from it during Spring. The Palo Verde tree I have is coming back late this year, I neglected to water it the whole Winter season, it's not dead because the trunk is still green while the top part is slowly recovering and turning green as well. I may see some yellow flowers later part of the Summer season considering what happened. Chase tree is doing just fine, I planted it in front of my dining room, it should bloom well this year. The young Pear tree I have is done blooming for this year. I could probably try and fertilized it so it can bear fruit but it might be too late for this year.

I'll try to take some photos, the Red Yuccas now have their red stalks, I did not take photos of the succulents this year with the orange/purple flowers but the Lavenders still have its purple flowers. The Rosemary bloomed early this Spring. Pink poppies are blooming like crazy, I can still take some photos of the flowers. One of the Aloe Vera plants will have its white flowers soon.
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Old 04-24-2013, 10:06 PM
 
Location: Pahrump, NV
2,064 posts, read 2,736,215 times
Reputation: 1763
if you don't mind shopping online, there's always high country gardens, which specializes in low water plants

Low Water Plants, Eco Friendly Landscapes: High Country Gardens
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Old 04-26-2013, 07:09 AM
 
1,433 posts, read 2,306,966 times
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You guys have some nice looking gardens.

I'm in the midst of redoing the entire backyard drip system. I've got all the water requirements calculated, today I will install the lines and from there I will simply observe and adjust.

I'm thinking the succulants will work around the pool, with perhaps a med palm somewhere as well.

I've been taking little tours of the gardens at UNLV, they only use native species apparently.

On that note, anyone know of a shrub that can really take the afternoon sun like a champ? I had some privets(still do) they have been fried, I think the queen palms that once provided them shade, died from the cold and now the privets just get scorched.
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Old 04-26-2013, 08:55 AM
 
Location: ( ͡ ͜ʖ ͡) (╯□)╯︵ ┻━┻ ̡
7,112 posts, read 10,850,060 times
Reputation: 3866
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exaday View Post
On that note, anyone know of a shrub that can really take the afternoon sun like a champ? I had some privets(still do) they have been fried, I think the queen palms that once provided them shade, died from the cold and now the privets just get scorched.
These take any kind of sun very well, forgot the name though. I grew them from seeds.







Motorola DynaTAC 8000x
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Old 04-26-2013, 09:25 AM
 
1,433 posts, read 2,306,966 times
Reputation: 1038
One of the areas I am having issue with, is the amount of water needed. I have perused a few forums on this and get sort of the same answers. I know there is no fixed number, but surely there is a ballpark.

I've used some nice formulas to calculate it. The math is right. I just feel like I'm not really sure.

For example I have some decent sized Mexican Fan palms and according to my formula they need about 3.8 gallons per day. That sure seems like a lot. Anyone have any knowledge on this? I'll have to go ask some master gardener soon.
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Old 04-26-2013, 10:09 PM
 
64 posts, read 70,121 times
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Mexican Fans don't require much water at all. I have a few in the front of the house, which I watered maybe twice this winter and they are still doing fine. In the backyard, they are roughly 8 feet tall and they get about 10 gallons twice a week (each have 2 five gallon per hour drippers that run for an hour). If you look at some of the vacant commercial properties around town you'll see that the Mexican Fans are still doing great even though they haven't had water for months. As for your shrubs, winter gem boxwoods seem to do really well. Also butterfly Iris' do really well and don't take much water at all. I have a few around the backyard and they don't even have their own drippers and they do fine.
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Old 04-27-2013, 01:18 AM
 
2,438 posts, read 2,499,736 times
Reputation: 1315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Exaday View Post
You guys have some nice looking gardens.

I'm in the midst of redoing the entire backyard drip system. I've got all the water requirements calculated, today I will install the lines and from there I will simply observe and adjust.

I'm thinking the succulants will work around the pool, with perhaps a med palm somewhere as well.

I've been taking little tours of the gardens at UNLV, they only use native species apparently.

On that note, anyone know of a shrub that can really take the afternoon sun like a champ? I had some privets(still do) they have been fried, I think the queen palms that once provided them shade, died from the cold and now the privets just get scorched.
Texas Ranger can take in the sun and can give you beautiful purple flowers for Summer 'till around October. A bit messy but if you don't mind cleaning after it then its a great plant, drought tolerant as well.
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