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Old 04-08-2008, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
11,565 posts, read 20,498,118 times
Reputation: 4160

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BUGBULLY View Post
I was thinking the same thing. Most people do not get close enough to look at their bellies!!!
Now BugBully you know that when a spider is clinging to its web the belly is what is exposed. Think about it. If you see a black widow you'll see the red hour glass. You'll never see them scurrying along the ground. They are always on a web. On the other hand, Wolf spiders are almost always crawling on the ground or sometimes a wall and you only see their backs. They are huge as spiders go but they won't do you much damage. I see them in my courtyard all the time at night. Sometimes I whack them and sometimes I just leave them alone. They eat a lot of insects.
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Old 04-08-2008, 10:22 PM
 
1,354 posts, read 2,869,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
Now BugBully you know that when a spider is clinging to its web the belly is what is exposed. Think about it. If you see a black widow you'll see the red hour glass. You'll never see them scurrying along the ground. They are always on a web. On the other hand, Wolf spiders are almost always crawling on the ground or sometimes a wall and you only see their backs. They are huge as spiders go but they won't do you much damage. I see them in my courtyard all the time at night. Sometimes I whack them and sometimes I just leave them alone. They eat a lot of insects.
Yeah thats us, and guys who are not afraid of spiders, but most people will not get that close to even look at them, just to whack them!!! I know before I got into this profession, I just tried throwing things at them, couldn't even get me close to them. Even now unless I have my contacts or my glasses on, I still call my Husband. He says you have you license kill them. Nope, in my house its his job. Plus I own a Pest Control company, no way should I even see the dang things!
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Old 04-09-2008, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Kingman AZ
15,378 posts, read 23,250,876 times
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I still prefer a shotgun......
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Old 04-09-2008, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
11,565 posts, read 20,498,118 times
Reputation: 4160
I just noticed in the center of each thread are ads concerning what we are talking about. Duh. How long did that take? I've always just blanked it out.
Pretty cool video on critters though.
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Old 04-09-2008, 02:59 PM
 
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Funny, I saw them there too, but never paid attention to what they were for!
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Old 04-09-2008, 03:03 PM
 
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I would not like to run into the fishing Spider, that one was nasty!
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Old 04-10-2008, 01:40 PM
 
Location: AZ
19,663 posts, read 51,231,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
Now BugBully you know that when a spider is clinging to its web the belly is what is exposed. Think about it. If you see a black widow you'll see the red hour glass
Not necessarily. Female widows only develop the hourglass upon maturity. In the meantime they go through life with vivid whites/reds/oranges on the dorsal part of their abdomen (their "backs" if you will), opposite of the ventral side where the hourglass forms later in life. It should also be noted that male widows are completely harmless, its only the female that is semi-dangerous.
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Old 04-10-2008, 04:33 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas, Nevada
11,565 posts, read 20,498,118 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Not necessarily. Female widows only develop the hourglass upon maturity. In the meantime they go through life with vivid whites/reds/oranges on the dorsal part of their abdomen (their "backs" if you will), opposite of the ventral side where the hourglass forms later in life. It should also be noted that male widows are completely harmless, its only the female that is semi-dangerous.
Thanks for that info. I think that if you see a black widow once you will know them from other spiders after that. Maybe not so with the Brown Recluse.
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Old 04-10-2008, 06:34 PM
 
1,354 posts, read 2,869,620 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buzz123 View Post
Thanks for that info. I think that if you see a black widow once you will know them from other spiders after that. Maybe not so with the Brown Recluse.
Yeah alot of people say we have them here. In the almost 10 years I have only seen one instance of them, and that was from people that moved from CA and brought one of them along for the ride. If you ever wonder what something is, you can always take a sample to the Department of Agriculture it is at 2300 Mcleod St. by the DMV on East Sahara. They will take it and send it to Reno and will send you the information on what it actually is.
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Old 04-10-2008, 07:09 PM
 
Location: NW Las Vegas - Lone Mountain
15,756 posts, read 21,060,597 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve-o View Post
Not necessarily. Female widows only develop the hourglass upon maturity. In the meantime they go through life with vivid whites/reds/oranges on the dorsal part of their abdomen (their "backs" if you will), opposite of the ventral side where the hourglass forms later in life. It should also be noted that male widows are completely harmless, its only the female that is semi-dangerous.
Hey Steve-o you know a lot about these critters.

About every 6 or 9 months my wife or I get bit by something. Two or three small puncture wounds in about an inch. We think they are always at the exposed skin line. Itch after a few hours which is when you notice them. Form small postule at the wound site and then a red ring around it. Quite itchy for a couple of days then heal and go away. A very protective cat patrols the bed and dispatches any insect noticed. Known to jump three feet in the air to get a moth on occassion. If the cat sees it dead meat. So it pretty much has to be small and nocturnal.

Any thoughts.
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