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Old 11-14-2018, 05:26 PM
 
Location: California
166 posts, read 37,368 times
Reputation: 240

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Quote:
Originally Posted by EA View Post
But your bills are monthly, right? Start thinking monthly instead of hourly.

I have no idea what you make, I'm just going to use 10 for easy math.

If you make 10 an hour and focus on that, it's hard to think long term.
But if you think monthly instead, you can set goals and budget better.
Instead of thinking about 10 you think about 1600.
Your bills are 1200 and you'll bring home 1600. You know you have 400 to play with. So you can plan accordingly. Take 100 a week out of each check and put it in savings.


That's my approach anyway.
This is great advice!

 
Old 11-14-2018, 06:23 PM
 
27,048 posts, read 38,303,229 times
Reputation: 34997
Quote:
Originally Posted by chahunt View Post
Sounds like one hell of a job. What are the qualifications do be a computer consultant? Degree required? I will have to google more about what they do.
I was self taught over a period of a couple of decades. A few classes here and there to satisfy requirements, but most of the time I would pick up a book or go online to learn. One thing I never did was charge a client for my learning time. I felt it was not their place to pay me for my education. Qualifications vary widely depending on what field you want to be in. I suggest asking some questions in the Computer Forum.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chahunt View Post
That does sound amazing, particularly about it being better stress-wise. Not to mention all the other perks from working at home and being your own boss. Did someone have to teach you how to do a start-up on your own? I'm guessing that part is rather complicated.
I decided to name my company CSI. Computer Support was easy. The I not so much. So I sat down with a dictionary open to the "I's" and wrote down every one I thought might pertain. I ended up with Initiative which pretty much described my attitude and what it was going to take to get things rolling.

I hopped in my car with a voice recorder and drove through all the areas in town where there were small businesses making verbal notes regarding address, type of business, etc. I then checked the state records to make sure they really were in business. I whittled the list down to 1,000 possibilities and sent out a letter describing myself and the company.

My first nibble ended up being my best customer. $2k a month average. Most of them I landed because they were not happy with their current support and when I saw some of the crap these places would do to people I was both mad and glad. Mad because they shouldn't do some of things they did, and glad because I took away their business and did things correctly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chahunt View Post
So, would you recommend it to someone possibly considering a career change, (or 2nd career)? Why would you not do it here in Vegas? Or why can computer consultants not make that amount of money here in NV? If you work for self, can't you just set your own rates wherever? Or maybe the overall rates in Vegas for that industry are lower as a whole.
I can't be certain, but from things I've read in these forums I don't think you can charge that much here so you need to research what places charge. You have to figure out how much you need to bring in to make the move. It's not a steady gig. Like I mentioned earlier there are down times and up times. Keep in mind that when the economy tanks IT is the first to go. That includes people like me as well as those on a payroll. I didn't start at $100, but built up to it as the economy ate into overhead. Every time I raised my rates I received no complaints from clients.

It takes a certain mindset and attitude to do the kind of work I did. So many techs work for someone else and usually end up in a niche within a company. That's what I ended up not liking. That and more and more work being dumped on me w/o decent raises. I can't repeat the word my boss said when I handed him my resignation. I had told him for three years to fix my salary and it never happened. Buh bye!

To do what I did you have to be a Jack of all Trades or be able to quickly learn what is required to fix a problem, or add devices, or do wiring, or..... You never know what someone will want. With the Internet and Google it's easier than it was back when I started playing with computers.

One client ran Auctions every few months and the person who wrote the program to track it all - disappeared. So I was tasked with making changes and improvements. Luckily I had done programming off and on so I knew the basics. It took me a while but with my wife's help (also a tech) I got everything he wanted in the program.

An example of something other than just fixing a computer that cropped up. And there were many of them over the years. I always loved the challenge!

My best advice is to ask questions of people in the business. I left in 2009/10 and things have changed while I've not kept up so asking others is a must.
 
Old 11-14-2018, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
663 posts, read 461,183 times
Reputation: 588
Tek, thanks for the thorough response. I'm definitely going to look into it more. I'm glad it was such a successful career choice for you. Also that's good to know about job security (or lack of) from an economic standpoint. Appreciate it!
 
Old 11-14-2018, 07:32 PM
EA
 
Location: Las Vegas
5,539 posts, read 4,715,556 times
Reputation: 5986
It's really hard to go wrong in the computer field these days. Everything is moving to computers.
Software and I don't get along so well, a computer career is not something I can get.

I am pushing my kids into it as hard as I can without making them hate it.
 
Old 11-14-2018, 09:36 PM
 
1,692 posts, read 3,060,677 times
Reputation: 1796
I have been working in IT (mostly in software development) for almost twenty years now. It's a great occupation right now, but it's always shifting. The move to "cloud" is moving some jobs out of the enterprise and up to the cloud software vendors.

IMO, the days of making it without a degree are closed or closing fast. The job market is tight for senior people, but we are deluged with applications for entry level positions. Many have masters degrees (either in computer science, information systems, or MBA). I can't believe how many people just do a bachelors degree followed immediately by a masters without even hitting the job market in between or maybe they just did an internship. Masters has become the new bachelors and bachelors is the new high school diploma.

Owning a consultant business is different. Either you're highly specialized (usually senior level with a fair amount of experience) and working contracts, often flying all over the country or you're a jack of all trades being the IT staff at small business (doctors offices, lawyers offices, etc.) when they cannot afford to have an IT guy on staff full time.

The idea you can "learn computers" and make six figures from your bedroom working for Google is not remotely accurate for most people. The big four (Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook) are extremely picky. Most computer jobs realistically start in the 50-75k range and work up from there. Plenty of people make 100k+, but generally with many years of experience.
 
Old 11-14-2018, 09:51 PM
 
4,442 posts, read 5,329,404 times
Reputation: 4501
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gatopescado View Post
A bad day in Vegas is better than California anytime.
Amen!

But if someone else with kids wants to leave town so much the better, I donít want Vegas turning into just another boring mediocre breederville. Itís not for everyone but itís a great place for night owls who love great weather, saving money on taxes, and always having something to do.

Your issues with crime sound like a personal problem. If I lived in Oakland I wouldnít complain about the crime in SF. If youíre living in a bad part of town, there will be crime. Donít live there.

I think Vegas is an amazing city for anyone with money, but I canít imagine it being a good city if youíre poor. Your house / living situation will mean you are miserable all summer (a nice house will keep cool no matter), canít enjoy the amazing restaurants and shows much if at all, donít take advantage of no income taxes, and generally donít have the time or money to enjoy all the city offers.
 
Old 11-14-2018, 11:48 PM
 
27,048 posts, read 38,303,229 times
Reputation: 34997
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestieJeff View Post
I have been working in IT (mostly in software development) for almost twenty years now. It's a great occupation right now, but it's always shifting. The move to "cloud" is moving some jobs out of the enterprise and up to the cloud software vendors.

IMO, the days of making it without a degree are closed or closing fast. The job market is tight for senior people, but we are deluged with applications for entry level positions. Many have masters degrees (either in computer science, information systems, or MBA). I can't believe how many people just do a bachelors degree followed immediately by a masters without even hitting the job market in between or maybe they just did an internship. Masters has become the new bachelors and bachelors is the new high school diploma.

Owning a consultant business is different. Either you're highly specialized (usually senior level with a fair amount of experience) and working contracts, often flying all over the country or you're a jack of all trades being the IT staff at small business (doctors offices, lawyers offices, etc.) when they cannot afford to have an IT guy on staff full time.

The idea you can "learn computers" and make six figures from your bedroom working for Google is not remotely accurate for most people. The big four (Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook) are extremely picky. Most computer jobs realistically start in the 50-75k range and work up from there. Plenty of people make 100k+, but generally with many years of experience.
An excellent post that I could not have made. As I said I've been out of the game for about 8 years.

The text in bold was me.

The text in red was easier to do back when. Now? Yikes!
 
Old Yesterday, 01:00 AM
 
30 posts, read 10,961 times
Reputation: 21
That, and big N don't offer remote.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WestieJeff View Post
The idea you can "learn computers" and make six figures from your bedroom working for Google is not remotely accurate for most people. The big four (Amazon, Google, Apple, and Facebook) are extremely picky.
 
Old Yesterday, 09:01 AM
 
206 posts, read 186,881 times
Reputation: 306
I disagree with most of your points with the exception of the 'tipping', As someone who recently began to do Postmates i am baffled by the entitlement of some people in particular those in wealthier areas who I've dealt with. They're usually the worst of customers, They'll have an entire list of demands and refuse to tip; As someone else who pointed it out we're all aware "you don't get rich by tipping" but there is such thing as oh i don't know being grateful for the extra service you're being provided, for having the delivery man go out of their way to delivering your products to your 5th floor doorstep without leaving them at the lobby or at concierge etc.

I will also agree with the driver situation here, Just yesterday i was turning left on the green light off W.Craig when an idiot from across the road ran the red-light and was only inches from crashing into my car. I have a theory about this too, I'm almost convinced it has a lot to do with how easy it is to obtain a DL in California. I've heard this from many truck-drivers and Californian's, So i don't know what the hell is going on in their DMV's but it needs to stop lol.
 
Old Yesterday, 12:24 PM
 
27,048 posts, read 38,303,229 times
Reputation: 34997
Cell phones. Add a huge fine and enforce it.

Last night a driver came flying past us and we caught a red light. I drove away and watched the vehicle sit at the light. 35 mph and I was 3 blocks away before a curve stopped my view and they were still there.

Cell phones. Add a huge fine and enforce it.
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