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Old 08-11-2019, 12:38 PM
Status: "Goodbye Portland, Hello Las Vegas!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Henderson, NV
5,882 posts, read 6,074,581 times
Reputation: 6789

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That’s a good point, same here! There is tons of active construction on our street. They are mostly done with the houses within a 2-3 house radius but not quite, and even then they’re just moving up the street a bit. It’ll be I think 8-10 months before our street is finished and 18 months for the entire development. I knew that was one “negative” to new construction but worth it if you’re there for the long haul. This is the first place ever where I’ve wanted to be!

I will take a look at the filters after a month and then each week after that, maybe get an idea for how often things should be changed. I think I’ll just store my ladder upstairs rather than the garage ha ha.
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Old 08-11-2019, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Las Vegas
632 posts, read 579,261 times
Reputation: 591
When I lived in Northwest Vegas last year, the neighborhood was done, no construction anywhere near the house I lived in. It was still dusty as heck. Too many areas here with no grass, lots of dirt and rocks. A windy day blows all that stuff and it settles everywhere including around and on your house. Just something to be aware of and get used to. Beats the heck out of the daily rain and high dew point in SW FL 4-6 months of the year IMO. Glad I was finally able to sell my house there and move back here.

Last edited by movin1; 08-11-2019 at 01:59 PM..
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Old 08-11-2019, 07:51 PM
 
2,570 posts, read 665,644 times
Reputation: 4500
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonathanLB View Post
This is off topic but since you know so much about this stuff, do you really need to change air filters for HVAC every month?? In most climates Iíve heard 3-4 months, and these filters (house has 4 of them) are expensive at a monthly change of 4 haha.
The purpose of the air filter in the HVAC is to protect the HVAC unit. It is not to reduce the amount of dust in the house. As such, don't spend extra money on expensive air filters. The low end ones are fine. How often you need to change them depends on how much internal dust pollution exists in your home, which in turn is a function of how often you open doors and keep them open, the existence of pets, how often you cook, how airtight the house is, and probably a hundred other things.

I have these professionally installed: https://www.filtersfast.com/P-Honeyw...r-Purifier.asp for each HVAC unit. It uses charged plates through which air passes to collect dust and dirt, and a few times a year I wash the collectors off with a hose. In addition, I have the regular paper type everyone changes. Because of the Honeywell electronic air cleaners (located right at the FAU), the paper filters in the ceiling are good for a year or so, based on visual inspection.
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Old 08-14-2019, 10:34 AM
 
480 posts, read 377,481 times
Reputation: 441
I use the following filters from Honeywell in the ceiling instead of the one-inch filters from the big box stores: https://customer.honeywell.com/resou...0s/68-3062.pdf. I started using them after we replaced all of our HVAC systems a couple of years ago, and I have found that I only need to change them once each year. The reason I switched to these filters is that I learned that they are supposed to put a lot less stress on your HVAC system than some of the one-inch filters.
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Old 08-14-2019, 07:19 PM
 
1,836 posts, read 3,239,462 times
Reputation: 1974
Do these sit in the return air location? I've only ever seen them one inch deep or whatever to accommodate the normal big box air filter size?

Oops.. I see now they have a lip to allow them to fit in the standard location. I'll have to try it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ND_Irish View Post
I use the following filters from Honeywell in the ceiling instead of the one-inch filters from the big box stores: https://customer.honeywell.com/resou...0s/68-3062.pdf. I started using them after we replaced all of our HVAC systems a couple of years ago, and I have found that I only need to change them once each year. The reason I switched to these filters is that I learned that they are supposed to put a lot less stress on your HVAC system than some of the one-inch filters.
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Old 08-15-2019, 12:23 PM
 
480 posts, read 377,481 times
Reputation: 441
Quote:
Originally Posted by WestieJeff View Post
Do these sit in the return air location? I've only ever seen them one inch deep or whatever to accommodate the normal big box air filter size?

Oops.. I see now they have a lip to allow them to fit in the standard location. I'll have to try it.
These really work well for us since we do not have an inline air cleaner in the attic. I just looked at one of the spare filters I have, and the filter extends a couple of inches above the lip. While they cost a bit more than the one-inch filters upfront, our experience has been that we only need to change them once per year instead of quarterly or monthly. In addition, from what I have read online on HVAC forums, they put less stress on the HVAC equipment.

We purchase our filters from SupplyHouse.com since they tend to have the best pricing, and they typically can deliver to the Las Vegas metro area in a day now that they have a fulfillment center in northern Nevada. Here is a link to their selection of Honeywell return grille filters: https://www.supplyhouse.com/Honeywel...lters-21201000.
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Old 08-15-2019, 12:31 PM
 
2,570 posts, read 665,644 times
Reputation: 4500
Quote:
Originally Posted by ND_Irish View Post
I use the following filters from Honeywell in the ceiling instead of the one-inch filters from the big box stores: https://customer.honeywell.com/resou...0s/68-3062.pdf. I started using them after we replaced all of our HVAC systems a couple of years ago, and I have found that I only need to change them once each year. The reason I switched to these filters is that I learned that they are supposed to put a lot less stress on your HVAC system than some of the one-inch filters.
Yes, those are great for the reason you identify: any restriction such as a pleated air filter makes the blower motor work harder. The deep filter such as yours means there is much more surface area of filtration, so the motor is moving the given quantity of air through a larger surface area filter, which in turn results in lower stress on the motor.

It will help your blower motor last much longer. A similar method is to use the most inexpensive throw-away filters you can find - they provide very little restriction to airflow, thereby helping your blower motor last longer. They still provide some protection to the forced air unit as they will filter out pet hair, human hair, and some of the larger dust.
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Old 08-15-2019, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Southern Highlands
1,426 posts, read 904,584 times
Reputation: 1209
Help the blower motor last longer? Why bother. I have never had to replace one, or even heard of anyone replacing theirs. Still, less flow restriction makes the system more efficient.
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Old 08-16-2019, 01:06 AM
 
777 posts, read 317,568 times
Reputation: 453
In keeping with the original question.... 3 stage osmosis is practically as good as you're going to get.


If you have a good refrige with the GE MWF filter.... you've already filtered 99.9% of what you're going to get with O water.

The water here is terrible. I'd filter it... but a good .001 carbon block or a reverse osmosis is as good as you're going to get, IMHO.

Even if you reverse oz.... there are chemicals that get through like SSRI medicines and that **** just can't be filtered.

If you want true clean you gotta buy from somewhere else.
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Old 08-16-2019, 02:41 PM
 
2,570 posts, read 665,644 times
Reputation: 4500
Quote:
Originally Posted by equid0x View Post
Even if you reverse oz.... there are chemicals that get through like SSRI medicines and that **** just can't be filtered.
A Reverse Osmosis Membrane is not a filter. It is a solid membrane that passes H2O and little else.

Due to manufacturing tolerances, some dissolved solids do get through.
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