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Old 05-27-2010, 09:44 AM
 
28 posts, read 57,346 times
Reputation: 38
Default Worst Areas In LAS VEGAS!!!

What are the areas to avoid in LV, if you're looking for a safe area with great schools to raise your family. Our home rental budget $2600 per month max. If you can break it down by zip code, with your explanation it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks guys.
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Old 05-27-2010, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Fort Wayne
470 posts, read 562,776 times
Reputation: 259
LOL...IMHO?

1) Most of East Vegas and Old North Vegas: From Craig to Flamingo West of Hollywood and East of Las Vegas Blvd.
Huge area,I know and it DOES have some good areas,but overall high crime and crappy housing make this area a loser.

2) The old West Side: Anywhere just off MLK (a mile on either side) north from Alta until you get to Cheyenne. Again for the reasons above

3) Twain - The majority of areas along Twain. For the reasons above.

4) Boulder Highway - From Fremont to about Nellis.

5) Downtown Las Vegas - What else needs to be said?

6) Downtown North Las Vegas - Again...what else needs to be said?

IMHO, Summerlin (pricey, Henderson, NW Vegas and Northern N Las Vegas are about the nicest areas in which to live.
However,as a somebody from Nevada,I would recommend that you take the current lack of economic opportunity and the upcoming water into mind before making any plans to relocate.

Just FYI....
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Old 05-28-2010, 12:37 AM
 
369 posts, read 438,085 times
Reputation: 435
89101 avoid it. Do keep doing your homework before you get here. I let my wife find our rental when we moved. We ended up in 89101. It was not a good time. When we did get our home built my whole outlook changed.
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Old 05-28-2010, 05:22 PM
 
Location: Charleston, SC missing home Reno NV
369 posts, read 605,487 times
Reputation: 157
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocytus View Post
However,as a somebody from Nevada,I would recommend that you take the current lack of economic opportunity and the upcoming water into mind before making any plans to relocate.

Just FYI....

what do you mean the "upcoming water". Ive seen for awhile the water drought in the south west areas... but is this a true concern ? We have been talking about moving to Vegas for a long time - I applied for a job there several months ago but they froze the positions, IM not surprised because of the economy (However I am self employed and can work from home anywhere)...

can you elaborate on what you mean?
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Old 05-28-2010, 05:32 PM
 
Location: Here and there, you decide.
9,417 posts, read 14,218,755 times
Reputation: 2340
they have been saying water shortage for years... blah blah blah.. i'll be dead before it happens
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Old 05-28-2010, 05:40 PM
 
Location: NW Las Vegas - Lone Mountain
15,757 posts, read 19,764,773 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by VerdeOjos5 View Post
what do you mean the "upcoming water". Ive seen for awhile the water drought in the south west areas... but is this a true concern ? We have been talking about moving to Vegas for a long time - I applied for a job there several months ago but they froze the positions, IM not surprised because of the economy (However I am self employed and can work from home anywhere)...

can you elaborate on what you mean?
Ignore it. There may well be an issue with water eventually on the Colorado...but Las Vegas will be fine. And even that issue is some years away.

I would think going back to uncontrolled growth at the rate of the early 2000s would not be the smartest thing. But it is also unlikely anytime soon.

The Colorado system could require a massive redo someplace along the line...there are for instance huge allocations up stream of Vegas and Indian tribes that have potentially huge claims.

Any of that starts to come to pass however and we likely end up rejuggling the allocations. Nevada got screwed originally and would likely do much better on a redo. CA would catch it in the chops. One possible outcome would be to allow the rights to be sold...an outcome that would be golden for Las Vegas.

So yeah there will eventually be some problems with the Colorado. But the odds strongly favor a good outcome for Las Vegas.
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Old 05-29-2010, 04:22 AM
 
Location: Fort Wayne
470 posts, read 562,776 times
Reputation: 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by VerdeOjos5 View Post
what do you mean the "upcoming water". Ive seen for awhile the water drought in the south west areas... but is this a true concern ? We have been talking about moving to Vegas for a long time - I applied for a job there several months ago but they froze the positions, IM not surprised because of the economy (However I am self employed and can work from home anywhere)...

can you elaborate on what you mean?
Sure.
Las Vegas is;of course, a desert. and as such it has limited rainfall and water resources.
Lake Mead, the source of Las Vegas' drinking (since the aquifer beneath the town has been depleted) is at the lowest level that it's been for years.
A massive project to lower the water sourcing pipes deeper into the lake is underway,but that will only slow,not stop, the upcoming crisis.
It won't provide additional water nor will do anything to alleviate the growing issue of hard water that is going to cost Las Vegans a nice chunk of change in near future.

Alternative plans, such buying water from Central Nevada,desalination plants and even a proposed canal from the Snake River in Idaho are all being "explored."

But given that it sometimes takes DECADES for major projects to leap the legal and environmental hurdles that they usually face, all of those projects should be underway NOW so that they can be completed BEFORE or AS they are needed.To my knowledge,none of them are in anything other than the "planning stages".Which means they likely aren't going anywhere soon.

Coupled w/ the fact that given the current state of the US economy and the crumbling infrastructure in more economically significant areas of the country funding for any major project will be scarce,it begs the question of who would even finance those types of projects?

Las Vegas has too many people living there and insufficient water to support them.
Could this problem be solved?
Sure and there several solutions:

1) Drastically curtail water use/misuse (No pools,car washes,etc)
2) Increase the cost of water usage to promote conservation ( Make water expensive)
3) Promote more conversation technologies by tax incentives and mandates.

Those are short-term solutions.

Long term solutions are:

1) Seeking additional water sources (Expensive,time consuming, and will almost certainly legal wrangling that will waste valuable time)
2) Severely restrict businesses that use water excessively ( Casinos,car washes,etc which will drastically change the way of life there)
3) Reduce the population by either restricting new residency or paying incentives for people to move from the area,thus reducing the water burden.

I'm a Nevadan who lives out of state and I think that this issue should have been SOLVED at least a decade ago and it hasn't been. Now everybody is playing catch-up and they aren't even doing that well.

I would urge anybody that is planning on moving here do their research and take a long and sober look at whether Las Vegas' future should be yours.
Wishing that there will be water here won't bring more water.
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Old 05-29-2010, 04:25 AM
 
Location: Fort Wayne
470 posts, read 562,776 times
Reputation: 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by olecapt View Post
Ignore it. There may well be an issue with water eventually on the Colorado...but Las Vegas will be fine. And even that issue is some years away.

I would think going back to uncontrolled growth at the rate of the early 2000s would not be the smartest thing. But it is also unlikely anytime soon.

The Colorado system could require a massive redo someplace along the line...there are for instance huge allocations up stream of Vegas and Indian tribes that have potentially huge claims.

Any of that starts to come to pass however and we likely end up rejuggling the allocations. Nevada got screwed originally and would likely do much better on a redo. CA would catch it in the chops. One possible outcome would be to allow the rights to be sold...an outcome that would be golden for Las Vegas.

So yeah there will eventually be some problems with the Colorado. But the odds strongly favor a good outcome for Las Vegas.
California is the most populous state in the US AND a major agricultural exporter.
Do you honestly believe that if anybody is going "catch it in the chops" it would be them? Or a state w/ less people in it than the city of Los Angeles?
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Old 05-29-2010, 04:47 AM
 
Location: NW Las Vegas - Lone Mountain
15,757 posts, read 19,764,773 times
Reputation: 2661
Quote:
Originally Posted by cocytus View Post
California is the most populous state in the US AND a major agricultural exporter.
Do you honestly believe that if anybody is going "catch it in the chops" it would be them? Or a state w/ less people in it than the city of Los Angeles?
The big winner of most of the Colorado River battles has been AZ not CA. CA has primarily been a violator of the agreement routinely overdrawing its allocation.

When push comes to shove NV will likely do well. The primary CA use is agricultural which will not outpoint the various cities. The central valley wins by never reopening the allocation of the Colorado.

Las Vegas continues to search for water. It needs it if it is going to double one more time in population. But it is growth that will be curtailed if actual limits are reached. Again the question is some years away.

The aquifer under Las Vegas is not depleted. It has in fact risen over the last ten year. It is sufficient to supply a city of 300,000.
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Old 05-29-2010, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Fort Wayne
470 posts, read 562,776 times
Reputation: 259
Quote:
Originally Posted by olecapt View Post
The big winner of most of the Colorado River battles has been AZ not CA. CA has primarily been a violator of the agreement routinely overdrawing its allocation.

When push comes to shove NV will likely do well. The primary CA use is agricultural which will not outpoint the various cities. The central valley wins by never reopening the allocation of the Colorado.

Las Vegas continues to search for water. It needs it if it is going to double one more time in population. But it is growth that will be curtailed if actual limits are reached. Again the question is some years away.

The aquifer under Las Vegas is not depleted. It has in fact risen over the last ten year. It is sufficient to supply a city of 300,000.
Let's see:

1) California not "winning" is probably a thing of the past. More voters,more clout.
2) You seem to be unaware that there is a looming phosphate crisis. As that worsens,agriculture will almost definitely outstrip car washes and swimming pools. Oh yeah....and green lawns.
3) Where's your source of information about the population doubling? The employment rate is at a historically low right now and the Vegas basin can barely support its current residents.
And as for this "water search"..why would it be necessary? The entire Western US has been explored and mapped. All major water sources available using current technology has been identified. Any "search" should be over and the recovery of those resources should already have begun.
4) A natural aquifer tales hundreds of thousands ,if not millions, of years to create. How would it be realistically possible for more people to be living in Las Vegas now than have ever lived here and yet it local water source is increasing?
BY osmosis?
I think you need to take a trip to the Spring Preserve and see what they have to say about the matter.

Las Vegas in an endangered city and rational and clear-headed thought needs to be the order of the day. Not Pollyanna-ish hoping and dreaming.
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