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Old 07-25-2007, 12:29 AM
 
58 posts, read 257,384 times
Reputation: 30

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i have googled, called numbers everything i can think of
my family is from us but i am canadian
i want to get dual citizenship so i can relocate to the states

Anyone know how i go about this?

Thanks so much, in advance
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Old 07-25-2007, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Ohio, but moving to El Paso, TX August/September
431 posts, read 1,406,693 times
Reputation: 268
Quote:
Originally Posted by albianstar View Post
i have googled, called numbers everything i can think of
my family is from us but i am canadian
i want to get dual citizenship so i can relocate to the states

Anyone know how i go about this?

Thanks so much, in advance
Call the consulate of the country you were born in. Whether you can get dual citizenship or not depends on which country you were originally born in and then what country you go to, but the country that makes the rule is the one you were born in.

Here's 3 examples to make it a little clearer.

My hubby was born in Holland. Dutch people can have dual citizenship if they live in another country and have established lives there. Therefore, my husband can get US citizenship and he will not have to give up his Dutch citizenship. He can have dual.

For me, even if we moved to Holland, I would not be able to get dual citizenship. The US does not allow it (and I was born in the US), unless with specific countries (like Israel) and Holland isn't one of those countries. So if we went there, I'd stay American or go Dutch, but I wouldn't be able to be dual.

Our kids were born in the US. In the US, if a parent is foreign, depending on the country, the kids can also be dual. The big factor here is the parent has to have citizenship with another country (or be dual). My boys do have dual citizenship, but in the US, if you were born in the US, you can only have dual until a certain age and then you must declare one nationality or another. I think the age is something like 28 but don't quote me on it.

So 3 different scenarios. Bottom line is you need to check with a Canadian embassy or consular office to find out what the rules for their citizens are.
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Old 07-30-2007, 04:41 PM
 
645 posts, read 1,499,553 times
Reputation: 155
Quote:
Originally Posted by emjbulls View Post
Call the consulate of the country you were born in. Whether you can get dual citizenship or not depends on which country you were originally born in and then what country you go to, but the country that makes the rule is the one you were born in.

Here's 3 examples to make it a little clearer.

My hubby was born in Holland. Dutch people can have dual citizenship if they live in another country and have established lives there. Therefore, my husband can get US citizenship and he will not have to give up his Dutch citizenship. He can have dual.

For me, even if we moved to Holland, I would not be able to get dual citizenship. The US does not allow it (and I was born in the US), unless with specific countries (like Israel) and Holland isn't one of those countries. So if we went there, I'd stay American or go Dutch, but I wouldn't be able to be dual.

Our kids were born in the US. In the US, if a parent is foreign, depending on the country, the kids can also be dual. The big factor here is the parent has to have citizenship with another country (or be dual). My boys do have dual citizenship, but in the US, if you were born in the US, you can only have dual until a certain age and then you must declare one nationality or another. I think the age is something like 28 but don't quote me on it.

So 3 different scenarios. Bottom line is you need to check with a Canadian embassy or consular office to find out what the rules for their citizens are.
Just wanted to add a correction here that you as a US citizen can become a dual citizen. There are many people (US citizens by birth) who have obtained dual citizenship and it's perfectly fine as long as the second country allows it. Also, if you're born with dual citizenship in the US, you don't have to choose, you can remain a dual citizen for life.
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Old 01-20-2009, 01:20 PM
 
2,863 posts, read 5,178,491 times
Reputation: 1677
Stockholm is right, and it applies to most countries. The US does not recognize dual citizenship; if you qualify to be a US citizen, you can be one. If you also qualify to be a citizen elsewhere, no problem. The citizenship laws of other countries have no bearing on the citizenship laws of the US.
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Old 04-20-2009, 10:44 AM
 
1 posts, read 5,111 times
Reputation: 10
I need to know about Voluntary departure and if someone uses this option to go back when can they return to the US?????
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Old 04-08-2016, 03:29 PM
 
3 posts, read 1,644 times
Reputation: 10
My grandparents were both born in Mexico, (Leon and Guanajuato) and my father in Fort Worth, Texas. Is there anyone that can offer me advice on how to gain dual citizenship for Mexico and the USA ?
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Old 04-08-2016, 04:32 PM
 
Location: TOVCCA
6,954 posts, read 7,016,380 times
Reputation: 9276
Quote:
Originally Posted by angelapaez View Post
My grandparents were both born in Mexico, (Leon and Guanajuato) and my father in Fort Worth, Texas. Is there anyone that can offer me advice on how to gain dual citizenship for Mexico and the USA ?
Which country are you a citizen of now?
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Old 04-10-2016, 03:11 PM
 
10,197 posts, read 14,818,743 times
Reputation: 4894
Quote:
Originally Posted by emjbulls View Post
Call the consulate of the country you were born in. Whether you can get dual citizenship or not depends on which country you were originally born in and then what country you go to, but the country that makes the rule is the one you were born in.

Here's 3 examples to make it a little clearer.

My hubby was born in Holland. Dutch people can have dual citizenship if they live in another country and have established lives there. Therefore, my husband can get US citizenship and he will not have to give up his Dutch citizenship. He can have dual.

For me, even if we moved to Holland, I would not be able to get dual citizenship. The US does not allow it (and I was born in the US), unless with specific countries (like Israel) and Holland isn't one of those countries. So if we went there, I'd stay American or go Dutch, but I wouldn't be able to be dual.

Our kids were born in the US. In the US, if a parent is foreign, depending on the country, the kids can also be dual. The big factor here is the parent has to have citizenship with another country (or be dual). My boys do have dual citizenship, but in the US, if you were born in the US, you can only have dual until a certain age and then you must declare one nationality or another. I think the age is something like 28 but don't quote me on it.

So 3 different scenarios. Bottom line is you need to check with a Canadian embassy or consular office to find out what the rules for their citizens are.
The US does allow it. You will have no problem if you went ahead and got Dutch citizenship.
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Old 04-29-2016, 07:47 AM
 
3 posts, read 1,644 times
Reputation: 10
Hello and thank you everyone for chiming - in :

I was born in the US (Texas)
My father and mother in Texas, also. My grandparents were born in Mexico.
I spent seven years in Mexico, have been back in the states for five years and would very much like to have dual citizenship - US and Mx

I have my grandmothers and grandfather birth certificates.
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Old 04-29-2016, 08:29 AM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
6,268 posts, read 14,847,758 times
Reputation: 5478
For whatever info here. Your parents would be 1st Generation US born and could get Mexican citizenship based upon your Grandparents birth while you are 2nd Generation US born and cannot get automatic dual w/o requirements needed by Mexico like any other person.....then again they are always changing their laws.

My Great Grandson's father was born in Mexico as was his parents and a visit to the Mexican Consulate in the US with the original documents was all that it took. I have a home here for my Grandson to inherit w/o any hassles.

From what I have read in the past....1st gen no sweat for Dual....2nd Gen another matter.
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