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Old 02-22-2010, 10:15 AM
 
Location: Lexington
28 posts, read 50,484 times
Reputation: 21

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Quote:
Originally Posted by UKUKUK View Post
Shawn, I think you're looking at Lexington, Massachusetts.
I will admit that there are areas that don't offer what he/she is looking for, but there certainly are areas that have a neighborhood center with everything he/she would need. I am not saying that you're never going to have to get in a car. Her question is whether or not we have areas that are walking friendly. Can you honestly say that we do not have those areas.
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Old 02-23-2010, 11:51 PM
 
Location: The Lakes
2,375 posts, read 2,883,615 times
Reputation: 1072
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnCollins View Post
I will admit that there are areas that don't offer what he/she is looking for, but there certainly are areas that have a neighborhood center with everything he/she would need. I am not saying that you're never going to have to get in a car. Her question is whether or not we have areas that are walking friendly. Can you honestly say that we do not have those areas.
Yes. Definitely.

Lexington has a horrible walkability score.

We're less dense than some of the towns in central Illinois. Hell, I wouldn't live without a car in Detroit and it's way more dense than Lexington.

I'd only advise going carless in Lexington if you're willing to cross 7-9 lanes of extremely aggressive traffic on foot after a 10 mile walk, then go back again, while trekking through parking lots and the likes.
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Old 02-24-2010, 01:12 AM
 
Location: Lexington
28 posts, read 50,484 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by UKUKUK View Post
Yes. Definitely.

Lexington has a horrible walkability score.

We're less dense than some of the towns in central Illinois. Hell, I wouldn't live without a car in Detroit and it's way more dense than Lexington.

I'd only advise going carless in Lexington if you're willing to cross 7-9 lanes of extremely aggressive traffic on foot after a 10 mile walk, then go back again, while trekking through parking lots and the likes.
Okay, you got me??? What part of Lexington do you live in where you would have to walk 10 miles to get to a neighborhood center? Have you seen the criteria for walkability score? It says nothing about the number of lanes of traffic you have to cross. It also is not based on what you experience during a long distance excercise walk and that is not what the poster here is asking about. Its about distance to things like neighborhood centers, countdown crosswalks, wheelchair ramps on the curbs, etc.,. Here is the website so you can learn about it. What Makes a Neighborhood Walkable
Lexington is by no means at the top of the scale, but if you look at the scoring criteria you will find that we would score as good as some of the top ten major cities in the US. Just so everyone knows the top rated cities for walkability are #1 San Francisco, #2 New York, #3 Boston, #4 Chicago. If you are judging walkability on aggressive driving and having to cross lanes of traffic why are these cities considered to be the highest scoring? Anyone crossed the street in New York lately?
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Old 02-24-2010, 07:29 AM
 
Location: The Lakes
2,375 posts, read 2,883,615 times
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I feel much safer crossing in Chicago or New York than I do in Lexington, at least the drivers there honk before they hit you.

As a pedestrian on UK's campus, I find that anything outside of Kroger is going to require a 15-30 minute wait, then another 15-30 minute ride on the bus.

If you think Lexington is anywhere NEAR as walkable as the top 10 major cities, you're INSANE.

I hate to be so aggressive, but to live here without a car would SUCK. The only public trans we have is the slow bus system, and no person wants to walk on Nicholasville or Richmond road unless they're simultaneously trying to kill themselves.

Yeah, some neighborhoods here (SOME) have shopping centers, but a fast food restaurant and a chain haircutting place doesn't have everything you need, and when you need something else you may find yourself walking 3 miles down Man O' War.
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Your Mom's House
1,251 posts, read 2,280,835 times
Reputation: 751
Walkscore is a POS, period. All that site does is take an address you give it & shows you the businesses that are around it, then gives you a number from 1-100 based on that. It doesnt seem like it takes anything else into consideration. No bike lanes, sidewalks, if the businesses are actual useful things, not even some public transportation methods are shown unless its in a very major city.

For instance, I put in an address in the FL city I live in (its a major one). The address is downtown, is next to a bus hub, has tons of stuff around it, bike lanes, sidewalks, cafes, restaurants, bars, parks, trollies that takes you to all the urban neighborhoods, stadiums, etc. It got a 69.

I then put in an old Lexington address I lived at that's off of Todds Road. Its suburban hell, there's no sidewalks (hell, there's not even a shoulder on the road). But because its very close to Hamburg, it scored higher than my FL address.

Its garbage.
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Old 02-26-2010, 12:08 AM
 
277 posts, read 301,697 times
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Even though Hamburg might have a high score you never really see many people walking. I rode my bike to Walgreen's before and people looked at me like I was crazy.
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Old 02-26-2010, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Todds Rd. area
930 posts, read 1,621,036 times
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I've riden my bike around Pleasant Ridge and the street that backs to Chick-Fil-A before........not exactly enjoyable.

This is just a thought, but I tend to think Lexington just isn't the right size to be very walkable. What I mean here is the concept of living here without a car. You either need everything close or great public transportation to do that. We just aren't big enough to do that if this is the agreed upon concept of "Walkability". A bigger city will either have better public transportation, or be so large geographically that it just isn't feasible for people to leave their neighborhood/part of town. People complain about taffic here, but nobody seems to mind driving across town for something. Until that changes, I personally don't see much chance for change. I sure as heck wouldn't invest my own money in a business that was expecting people to walk to it unless it was near downtown/Chevy Chase/Campus.

If the definition of walkability is living somewhere that most of what you need you can walk to, we have a limited amount of neighborhoods that fit that description. When I was growing up, we lived on Lincoln Avenue in Kenwick. My dad would ride his bike to his office, my parents would walk downtown to eat and catch a movie at the Kentucky. They still needed a car to get to Kroger over on Euclid and other places. There are areas like this, but they are in older parts of town. (Obviously you COULD walk anywhere, but I am talking about places that it would be a pleasant experience!)
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Old 02-26-2010, 04:44 PM
 
Location: Your Mom's House
1,251 posts, read 2,280,835 times
Reputation: 751
Quote:
Originally Posted by LEXpert View Post
This is just a thought, but I tend to think Lexington just isn't the right size to be very walkable. What I mean here is the concept of living here without a car. You either need everything close or great public transportation to do that. We just aren't big enough to do that if this is the agreed upon concept of "Walkability". A bigger city will either have better public transportation, or be so large geographically that it just isn't feasible for people to leave their neighborhood/part of town. People complain about taffic here, but nobody seems to mind driving across town for something. Until that changes, I personally don't see much chance for change. I sure as heck wouldn't invest my own money in a business that was expecting people to walk to it unless it was near downtown/Chevy Chase/Campus.
I dont know if the size is really that much to blame. I've seen smaller cities that are a heck of a lot more pleasant to walk around than Lex. But I've seen bigger ones that are bigger messes too.

I really just think it comes down to poor planning & what the general residents demand.
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Old 02-27-2010, 05:23 PM
 
546 posts, read 823,799 times
Reputation: 503
The most important aspect is when the city developed. If it developed it's population base prior to the mass production of cars then the layout and infrastructure will be there for high walkability. If the city developed after cars became prevalent then walkability suffers. Even within cities you'll see the difference. With few exceptions walkable neighborhoods in all cities tend to be older.....hence the reason Chevy Chase is walkable but areas outside New Circle are not.

In addition to cars being prevalent another reason people shunned walkable neighborhoods was that neighborhoods with appropriate density to be walkable were typically fairly dangerous neighborhoods in which to live during the 60s-80s. Almost all development during that time was for less dense, "safer" neighborhoods that are today's suburbs. Urbanity really suffered during that time. Few people with the means to choose where to live would have lived in Fell's Point in Baltimore or Wicker Park in Chicago or Old Louisville or the Central West End in St Louis during those years. Those are all areas that gentrified beginning in the 90s and accelerating in the 2000s.
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Old 02-28-2010, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Todds Rd. area
930 posts, read 1,621,036 times
Reputation: 251
Excellent point Hey_Hey!!
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