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Old 10-30-2011, 11:56 PM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,730,771 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Benjamin Hubard View Post
I can't argue with how things may seem to you, but the 'new' London dialect doesn't represent a 'replacement' of the Englisn language (I can understand it well enough without any formal study, and it's much closer to standard English than some other regional dialects), and nor has its appearance been instantaneous - it's come about fairly quickly, but it was certainly well established when I was a young child 20 years ago.
I agree, it's distinctly English, does share some features with Cockney, the Southeast, but is also decidedly different. It seems to be more of a regional thing rather than an ethnic thing to, as most immigrants in Birmingham or Manchester or Leeds or anywhere else don't talk that way or much different from the general population.
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Old 10-31-2011, 08:04 AM
 
Location: London, UK
412 posts, read 518,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I agree, it's distinctly English, does share some features with Cockney, the Southeast, but is also decidedly different. It seems to be more of a regional thing rather than an ethnic thing to, as most immigrants in Birmingham or Manchester or Leeds or anywhere else don't talk that way or much different from the general population.
Amen to this. The 'Jafrican' label is fairly pathetic really, but does reflect the limited ear of some middle-class suburbanites and 'immigrants' to London from the elsewhere in the UK - you only have to listen to imitations of contempary youth speak on Radio 4 comedies to realise that these people think kids are basically going around talking Jamaican patois - the reality of it is of something with a huge variety of influences, that is distinctively London and which would sound as strange to someone from Jamaica or Nigeria as it would to Outraged of Tunbridge Wells....
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Old 11-29-2011, 05:16 PM
 
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You don't think there are versions in Manchester and Birmingham etc?
Isn't it just a mixture of London and Asian/African/Jamaican accents?
No more complicated than that....?
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Old 11-30-2011, 07:52 AM
 
Location: The western periphery of Terra Australis
24,691 posts, read 19,730,771 times
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Originally Posted by Hengist View Post
Not so long ago Cockney would have been looked down on, along with whatever Jewish immigrants to the East End sounded like, and you could not work in broadcasting without sounding like royalty. Now we lament the passing of Cockney as some sort of cultural catastrophe. Times change, and judging someone's personal qualities on the way they speak is pretty dumb.
I heard Cockney has 'migrated' away from it's traditional heartland in the East End to outer areas of London and the Home Counties. Kind of like what has happened to New York English. Those two accents seem very similar in being mostly working class accents that have been pushed out through gentrification. Probably one of the reasons why many of the blacks in the East End didn't take up Cockney was by then it wasn't as prevalent there as it had once been. Also maybe segregation with the Cockneys.
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Old 03-20-2012, 07:20 PM
 
686 posts, read 500,814 times
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The only regional accent I can put up with is Valley Californian, with its up speak etc.

It's almost sweet....almost.

Hate the rest of these bastardisations of the language.
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Old 03-20-2012, 10:44 PM
 
Location: The Silver State (from the UK)
3,633 posts, read 4,283,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mintgum84 View Post
The only regional accent I can put up with is Valley Californian, with its up speak etc.

It's almost sweet....almost.

Hate the rest of these bastardisations of the language.

You know that the english language is a culmination of other ones right?
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Old 03-30-2012, 10:39 AM
 
Location: Paris, France
320 posts, read 433,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
I heard Cockney has 'migrated' away from it's traditional heartland in the East End to outer areas of London and the Home Counties. Kind of like what has happened to New York English. Those two accents seem very similar in being mostly working class accents that have been pushed out through gentrification. Probably one of the reasons why many of the blacks in the East End didn't take up Cockney was by then it wasn't as prevalent there as it had once been. Also maybe segregation with the Cockneys.
I agree. I don't think Cockney's died at all - you're just more likely to hear it in Southend or Ilford than in Whitechapel or Hackney.

Likewise Cockney, and its child, Estuary English, has pushed out the traditional Essex dialect in places like Colchester, Chelmsford.

Languages and Dialects are constantly changing and shifting. So nuffin rong wiv de jafaican innit!
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Old 04-03-2012, 06:55 AM
 
5,662 posts, read 2,163,778 times
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After years in London and Kent i find myself down here in Deepest Darkest Devon.

N. Devon. "Yar allright my luverrr, ow's ee then?" = English. "Hello mate, how are you".

In a county with as small a population as this you can still hear the diiference in the accents between North and South. So with a population the size of Londons' it's not surprising that various accents become more prominent for a while. To many all the Home Counties accents sound the same, unless you live there, then a Kent accent sounds nothing like a Berkshire one.

I was in the Army for quite a while and with all the different accents i was surrounded by Wandering Accent Syndrome 'W.A.S.' made me sound like a right wierdo. In 20 years time the prominent accent could well sound completely different, again.
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Old 06-01-2012, 09:08 AM
 
14 posts, read 9,927 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Trimac20 View Post
The Brits use alot more slang/speak with more distinct accents and regionalisms than Americans or Australians, imo.
In England, that's only true for the north nowadays - how many accents do you know that originated from the South? But then my area doesn't even get any news on the regional news - so nothing from the norm! I had a transatlantic accent for a while, but I seemed to have grown out of it now. Now I don't even know what accent I have, just Southern English...I Salisbury how it's meant to be said though, and I was asked if I came from London when I was skiing! (I think it's because I sometimes drop my 'h'
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Old 06-01-2012, 03:16 PM
 
384 posts, read 353,503 times
Reputation: 371
Sounds like it is strictly reserved for chav scum and those who emulate them.
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