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Old 06-11-2010, 12:25 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
160 posts, read 244,826 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by nassau2suffolk View Post
Take a break from the flash cards and try the park for a while.
This is one of many misperceptions people have about this group of people. No- flashcards won't give a child a 160 IQ. They are born this way. They are often self- taught readers by the age of 3. Before you decide to pass judgement, please checkout a website called Hoagie's Gifted Education, or the Davidson Institute and maybe you will have a slightly better understanding of what you are talking about. This is not about being elitist, or thinking that these children are "better" than anyone else. It is about providing them with the tools they need to become well-rounded individuals so that they won't be unsuccessful adults.
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Old 06-11-2010, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Long Island
311 posts, read 517,743 times
Reputation: 274
What are the criteria for joining your club? How does one prove their child is gifted?
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Old 06-11-2010, 12:48 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
160 posts, read 244,826 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucew View Post
What are the criteria for joining your club? How does one prove their child is gifted?
There is no need to "prove" anything. It is a simple social outlet for those who are interested. In fact, it is really open to anyone interested in gifted education, so having a gifted child is not a requirement. I'm just hoping to bring people together and share some ideas about how to handle various aspects of educating these kids. I'm not interested in isolating these children and not exposing them to "typical" children. I'm doing this at the suggestion of a few child psychologists I've spoken with as an alternative to a private gifted school which is not affordable for our family (and I'm sure many others).
BTW- I was warned by all three of them that I would be met with animosity from school administrators and other parents but I didn't really believe them. Hmmm... interesting.
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Old 06-11-2010, 01:03 PM
 
Location: Long Island
311 posts, read 517,743 times
Reputation: 274
I guess I am totally confused. You want to start a club (get-together, whatever) for gifted children, but it is not a requirement that they actually be gifted?
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Old 06-11-2010, 01:03 PM
 
2,932 posts, read 5,531,064 times
Reputation: 742
I believe that Susan's attempt to self-generate additional resources for her child is a good thing. Gifted children have special needs just as low IQ students do.

The big problem comes from how these children are perceived, as evidenced by the comments on this thread. People are either resentful of them or, in many cases, parents are overly ego-involved. I think that these reactions come from the use of the word "Gifted". I think that if both high IQ and low IQ students were referred to as "special needs" students it would put it more into perspective for everybody.
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Old 06-11-2010, 01:06 PM
 
2,351 posts, read 3,530,715 times
Reputation: 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMoser View Post
I believe that Susan's attempt to self-generate additional resources for her child is a good thing. Gifted children have special needs just as low IQ students do.

The big problem comes from how these children are perceived, as evidenced by the comments on this thread. People are either resentful of them or, in many cases, parents are overly ego-involved. I think that these reactions come from the use of the word "Gifted". I think that if both high IQ and low IQ students were referred to as "special needs" students it would put it more into perspective for everybody.
Excellent post Tom +2 for you !!
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Old 06-11-2010, 01:08 PM
 
Location: Long Island
311 posts, read 517,743 times
Reputation: 274
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMoser View Post
I believe that Susan's attempt to self-generate additional resources for her child is a good thing. Gifted children have special needs just as low IQ students do.

The big problem comes from how these children are perceived, as evidenced by the comments on this thread. People are either resentful of them or, in many cases, parents are overly ego-involved. I think that these reactions come from the use of the word "Gifted". I think that if both high IQ and low IQ students were referred to as "special needs" students it would put it more into perspective for everybody.
I always took gifted to mean a child who is intellectually superior to his/her peers. I always took "special" to mean a kid who is not up to the same level as his/her peers.

I think Susan's attempt is fine and a good thing. BUT, if you are going to start a specialized group like this, there surely should be some standards as far as who can be in the club and who can't...otherwise it is not just for gifted kids, hence defeating the purpose of the club. And if it is just for gifted kids, then how is it determined which kids are gifted enough to be in the club?
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Old 06-11-2010, 01:10 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
160 posts, read 244,826 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMoser View Post
I believe that Susan's attempt to self-generate additional resources for her child is a good thing. Gifted children have special needs just as low IQ students do.

The big problem comes from how these children are perceived, as evidenced by the comments on this thread. People are either resentful of them or, in many cases, parents are overly ego-involved. I think that these reactions come from the use of the word "Gifted". I think that if both high IQ and low IQ students were referred to as "special needs" students it would put it more into perspective for everybody.
Thank you Tom. I agree 100% that the word "gifted" is a large part of the problem in advocating for their needs. They DO have special needs and should be considered special needs kids, however they are excluded from IDEA and have no rights to an appropriate education. But how do we change the term "gifted" to describe them at this point?
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Old 06-11-2010, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
160 posts, read 244,826 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucew View Post
I guess I am totally confused. You want to start a club (get-together, whatever) for gifted children, but it is not a requirement that they actually be gifted?
Yes it is for gifted children in part.... but it is mostly for the parents of these children to help each other in coming up with acceptable solutions to the problem. (the problem being that they will not benefit much from the regular curriculum and socially they will have difficulty finding peers with similar interests)
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Old 06-11-2010, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Long Island, NY
160 posts, read 244,826 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by brucew View Post
I always took gifted to mean a child who is intellectually superior to his/her peers. I always took "special" to mean a kid who is not up to the same level as his/her peers.

I think Susan's attempt is fine and a good thing. BUT, if you are going to start a specialized group like this, there surely should be some standards as far as who can be in the club and who can't...otherwise it is not just for gifted kids, hence defeating the purpose of the club. And if it is just for gifted kids, then how is it determined which kids are gifted enough to be in the club?

Well, being that I just started it and I really just want to hear what other people's experiences have been, I don't want to exclude too many people. I would be happy to chat with Gifted & Talented teachers, parents of gifted, advocates, or gifted students themselves... anyone interested in advocating for this group. As far as getting the kids together to socialize, that would come after getting to know one another and learning more about each others' children.
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