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Old 06-14-2010, 10:14 PM
 
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Hello. I recently studied a census map describing which nationality is most concentrated on which area. And it displayed Italian Americans as the primary population on Long Island. I like Italian Americans. But is there a particular reason why Italian Americans are concentrated the most on Long Island?
For instance, why aren't there many French Americans, Portuguese Americans, Greek Americans, Russian Americans or German Americans on Long Island in comparison to Italian Americans?
Do you actually see many Italian population around your neighborhood?

Thanks in advance for any insights.
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Old 06-14-2010, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Long Island (chief in S Farmingdale)
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Long Island does have a fairly large German population, though it is less than some other parts of the country as well as less than the Italian population.

The simplest answer is just that when Italians first emigrated to the United States they were heavily concentrated in NYC. With Long Island being a suburb of NYC it happened to be a major destination for many Italians who decided to move from NYC.

I do live in a heavily Italian area, and grew up in an even more Italian one.
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Old 06-14-2010, 10:48 PM
 
Location: Little Babylon
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Likely that they moved to the Island from Italy and NYC back when land was cheap. I remember many of the older homes owned by Italians from Italy had grapes and gardens. There are also a lot of Jews and Irish that settled neighborhoods a long time ago. Wyandanch had very large populations of German, Irish and Italian Americans.
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Old 06-14-2010, 10:55 PM
grant516
 
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Italian-Americans never move. They live at their parents house until it becomes theirs and then raise their kids there.

Plus, LI is close to such Italian-American bastions like Massapequa and Howard Beach. They wouldn't know what to do without such places.
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Old 06-14-2010, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Inis Fada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grant516 View Post
Italian-Americans never move. They live at their parents house until it becomes theirs and then raise their kids there.

Plus, LI is close to such Italian-American bastions like Massapequa and Howard Beach. They wouldn't know what to do without such places.
Last I checked Massapequa was on LI.
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Old 06-15-2010, 12:43 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grant516 View Post
Italian-Americans never move. They live at their parents house until it becomes theirs and then raise their kids there.

Plus, LI is close to such Italian-American bastions like Massapequa and Howard Beach. They wouldn't know what to do without such places.
I don't think that's true anymore, and I don't know many people who fit that stereotype. My three sisters and I all had moved out by the time we were 21, if not before, and with the exception of one--who just moved to Florida six months after I moved back here--we all settled in different states. When we inherited my mother's house, we sold it as fast as we could.

Long Island has a lot of Italian-Americans because it's close to New York, and a lot of Italian immigrants settled in the New York area. After WWII, a lot of Italian-American GIs left the city for the burbs.
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Old 06-15-2010, 04:42 AM
 
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It is true that Italian Americans tend to have what is called "strong family systems" - they stay close to their families of origin after they leave home and in general, are less likely to go away to college than say, their Jewish counterparts are.
Studies show this.
As far as an affinity for L.I., I would say the fact that so many Italians immigrated to N.Y., coupled with the fact that they tend to retain strong family ties through out the life span and the fact that iIalian culture is very accepted - even celebrated on Long Island make it a place that many I.A.s like to call home.

What I have never understood is why so many Italian - Americans continue - generation after generation - to define them selves as such. I am not against having pride in one's ancestry, but to speak and talk about it on a regular basis seems unusual.

I know of quite a few Italian Americans who have problems with the newer Hispanic population.
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Old 06-15-2010, 05:36 AM
 
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Well - to start with - I think they immigrated here in large numbers (United States immigration statistics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia). In addition to that, as a general rule (based on my own life experience) Italians NEVER MOVE! When they decide on calling a place home - they stay for generations and usually pass their house down from generation to generation.
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Old 06-15-2010, 05:47 AM
 
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If anyone of you spoke about blacks or jews like you just did about Italian-Americans you would be nailed to the cross by the resident liberal race baiters on this board.

I will agree on most comments but they really do apply to past generations. Even Massapizza is not the Italian ghetto it once was.
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Old 06-15-2010, 05:49 AM
 
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Sheena wrote....It is true that Italian Americans tend to have what is called "strong family systems" - they stay close to their families of origin after they leave home and in general, are less likely to go away to college than say, their Jewish counterparts are.
Studies show this.


What studies are you referring to? Perhaps Italian-Americans didn't have the money to go away to school like Jews did. You know, Jews are suppose to have a lot of money. Well, until Bernie Madoff got caught at least.
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