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Old 07-14-2010, 09:17 AM
 
2,630 posts, read 2,247,400 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mantaray14 View Post
Murray was smart to scale it down. She would taken the blame for the overloading Nassau's infrastructure on a dead end project, although I'm sure they offered her a nice cushy job somewhwere. She may not be perfect, but least she take's some responsiblity for being Nassau's steward.

Give people under 40 a chance to have career and then they will come. There's plenty of housing and condos for them and there is certainly no reason to build any commercial RE right now....
Yeah, Murray is the steward to the fearful 55+ GOP set who are afraid of change. Even the other big GOP players are distancing themselves from her. I admire her guts and tenacity but she is on the wrong side of progress and need. LI is falling waaayyy behind as a world class place to live. The middle class is declining and the rich can't (and won't sustain) the kind of suburban life LI was developed as. It can't compete. It won't compete. Murray is the steward and face of LI's unwillingness to compete, or grow or do any of the things necessary to facilitate your last paragraph. There is actually no employment incentive or living incentive. Those condos are predominantly for the over 55 set and most apartments are illegal mother daughters. It's getting old, tired and embarrassing to see every attempt at development shot down.

I agree no more commercial RE, no more malls (strip or otherwise). We need entertainment, culture, youth, downtowns, transportation, business incentives and tax generators. New Coliseum, minor league ballpark and casino would be far better than a glittering metropolis of vacant offices, empty retail and overpriced condos. Murray and Wang are both out of touch.
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Old 07-14-2010, 10:27 AM
 
163 posts, read 213,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mongoose65 View Post
I agree no more commercial RE, no more malls (strip or otherwise). We need entertainment, culture, youth, downtowns, transportation, business incentives and tax generators. New Coliseum, minor league ballpark and casino would be far better than a glittering metropolis of vacant offices, empty retail and overpriced condos. Murray and Wang are both out of touch.
I can certainly agree with you here, I just think the way to get these things you list above won't be through a mega-real estate development. I can't think of a single instance where a vibrant destination has ever come about in that manner!

Getting rid of MTA/LIRR and replacing with high speed rail to and from NYC would be a good start. Then you have to lower taxes drastically for business and homeowners...The rest would happen on it's own.
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Old 07-14-2010, 11:02 AM
 
959 posts, read 1,405,757 times
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Mantaray....I agree. This idea of "build it and they will come" only works for Field of Dreams.

First, we need to incentivize vibrant companies to come to Long Island. That means creating real tax incentives...both corporate and real estate....so that they invest in the area. It also means world class transportation. Why should all the big companies go to NJ or Westchester? Can't we offer them a sweet deal here?

Once you have that economic base and transportation, then you can beginning looking at new housing, entertainment, etc. Everything will follow.

The reason White Plains worked was simple. It was much cheaper for companies to locate their headquarters there than in NYC. Yet, they could still be near the most prosperous city in the world and easily do business with Manhattan. Until we incentivize solid companies to come here, they will look elsewhere (see Long Island City as an example).
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Old 07-14-2010, 12:50 PM
 
1,303 posts, read 2,142,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by azzurrony View Post
Mantaray....I agree. This idea of "build it and they will come" only works for Field of Dreams.

First, we need to incentivize vibrant companies to come to Long Island. That means creating real tax incentives...both corporate and real estate....so that they invest in the area. It also means world class transportation. Why should all the big companies go to NJ or Westchester? Can't we offer them a sweet deal here?

Once you have that economic base and transportation, then you can beginning looking at new housing, entertainment, etc. Everything will follow.

The reason White Plains worked was simple. It was much cheaper for companies to locate their headquarters there than in NYC. Yet, they could still be near the most prosperous city in the world and easily do business with Manhattan. Until we incentivize solid companies to come here, they will look elsewhere (see Long Island City as an example).
Add an area like Stamford to the White Plains discussion as well. And Murray is wrong to scale it back IMO. It needs to be designed more toward young professional housing (read "affordable) and include a REAL commercial hub that would compel biz to stay and/or grow here. It needs a county-based business incubator that will fund financial, environmental and tech startups (from the tax dollars it draws in), provide tax incentives to do so in that particular development center, and be a clean train run to and from the city. I do not care if all of the aged and vanilla commercial space is flagging at the moment, an actual progressive commercial space would draw business to the area in the new digs, and when successful they would fill up the ancilliary office space now empty: like accounting firms, law firms, office services and the like. The other thing they should fund and headquarter there is a progressive "Main Street Inc", which would be a private/public consortium that studies, funds and develops downtown areas to extend the need for these types of communities for young professionals and reinvigorate some shore towns and main street hubs. Long island could then be seen as taking the next step from the "first suburb in america" to a model of town level redevelopment.

A cultural center works as well and it could be easily knit into the Hofstra/NCC area from an educational standpoint. Add in the Entertainment center for the islanders and off-season soccer and independent league baseball teams, finito! Forget the casino as that simply draws in a nice Atlantic city element.

I am JRP, and I approved this message
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Old 07-14-2010, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Nassau, Long Island, NY
15,856 posts, read 17,094,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johninwestbury View Post
I feel the Lighthouse is the right project in the wrong place. There is no transit hub in Uniondale (no rail, some bus) there which is needed for such a huge project. The traffic would be a mess since most ppl would drive and it wouldn't benefit Hempstead at all. Hempstead could be a much better place, but the problem is politicians. I'd like to see Hempstead prosper like White Plains up in Westchester. Hempstead has lots of bus lines and electric train service. The problem is the stupid politicians dont want to condemn all the run down buildings that will need to be torn down so new buildings could be built. So the illegals will have no place to live and shop, who cares, they arent supposed to be here anyway!
With hotels, condos, business, and retail Hempstead could make a huge comeback. With the illegals and other criminal activity driven out people will want to go to the "Hub" again and the village would get so much more revenue. But it's all being squandered so no one has to be called "racist". Gimme a break!
You're right. I drove through Hempstead on my way to Garden City last week with a couple of former LI'ers and they were aghast to see the HUGE BRAND NEW "cultural center" (complete with all the signs in spanish) on Peninsula Boulevard. I told them that Hempstead now might as well be Central America, complete with gunfire, as the gangs continuously replicate the never-ending "civil wars" back home. I guess our tax dollars were again at work on behalf of illegal aliens instead of people who actually belong here.
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Old 07-14-2010, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Nassau, Long Island, NY
15,856 posts, read 17,094,026 times
Reputation: 6522
Quote:
Originally Posted by 1nevets View Post
If you tore down the whole village of Hempstead and rebuilt it, it could never be like White Plains. White Plains is such a marvel because of the many fortune 500 companies near or within its city limits. Its upscale retail also stays condensed. For some strange reason Long Island loves to spread out its industry and retail. Do we really need the Oyster Bay Town Center? If Neiman Marcus really wants the LI dollar find a site at Roosevelt Field or on the Miracle Mile. I still can't believe Saks left Garden City to go to Walt Whiman?
You are confused because you apparently assume that White Plains is totally wealthy and upscale with nobody poor and never had a moment of urban decay. It did and it has come a long way in eradicating any urban decay, hence John's comment on Hempstead.
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Old 07-15-2010, 06:04 AM
 
Location: Long Island
8,900 posts, read 3,024,514 times
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I still canít believe they are still considering putting a casino in that area, of course DíAmato, Mondello, and Mangano support it so has to be more than meets the eye. I have not seen any good ideas come out of any of the planning for the Calverton or Pilgrim State Property either, more of the same retail space, hotels but no focus to bring in companies.

One of the selling points of the Wang development was that students at Hofstra taking hotel management could have first hand experience at the hotels; did they ever hear of Manhattan? Can blackjack dealer classes be far behind.
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Old 07-15-2010, 07:52 AM
 
163 posts, read 213,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodnight View Post
One of the selling points of the Wang development was that students at Hofstra taking hotel management could have first hand experience at the hotels; did they ever hear of Manhattan? Can blackjack dealer classes be far behind.
We will not move forward until our leaders finally understand exponential growth is not viable...Our open spaces are a huge draw to long island, and will very valuable one day. Just look at how Long Beach has turned around by investing in their parks and beaches.
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Old 07-15-2010, 08:08 AM
 
1,303 posts, read 2,142,632 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mantaray14 View Post
We will not move forward until our leaders finally understand exponential growth is not viable...Our open spaces are a huge draw to long island, and will very valuable one day. Just look at how Long Beach has turned around by investing in their parks and beaches.
IMO you are mis-applying the open spaces argument to a 70 acre area of decrepit asphalt parking lots and crummy strip malls...This is not proposed for the Pine Barrens out east or near any shoreline.
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Old 07-15-2010, 09:57 AM
 
Location: Long Island, New York
16,273 posts, read 5,899,183 times
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"all the money is coming from wang"........wrong, only partially and only for the construction,,, not the rest of it,,,and wang is STILL looking for investors to FUND this project
understand INFRASTRUCTURE?? and Scott Rechler is not exactly reliable (((( There's nothing but a pile of dirt on the site along the Long Island Expressway in North Hills where Scott Rechler's Ritz-Carlton luxury development was supposed to have begun rising two years ago. Chill winds sweep over empty flats in Bridgeport, Conn., where he and his partners were to remake the skyline with a $1.5-billion district of chic waterfront condos, shops and yachts.)))))



Building this huge thing with 'luxury apartments, low wage apartments, retail stores, a 'canal', a trollie, etc will ADD cost to the infrastructure of the state, county, town and district.

YOUR taxes (town/county and state) pay for garbage..police...water...sewe r..fire...schools... electricity for municipalities (to include street lamps), BUSES (hmm MTA is alreay cutting back services and raising fees),. etc

it doesnt address:

increase in garbage...TOH is already backlogged on what to do with their solidwaste.......the extra garbagemen and their trucks and where to refine it (the burning plant is already at max capacity,landfills are CLOSED, and we SHIP our garbage to other states)

the already overburdoned electric grid..to include all the ' extra''municipal' lighting.....the extra load on the electric grid, the LIPA says is maxed out already (remember we prevented shoreham)...(lipa BUYS power from PA and CT..and lipa is raising rates).......who will pay that bill????...THE TAXPAYER AND YOU WILL ALSO SEE IT IN YOUR RATE INCREASES

the already overburdoned sewer systems(toilet water) on long island....The sewer (waste treatment plants) have been for years saying that they need more and newer ones (ceder creek is so overused look at all the waste that get dumped into the bay (right back into the aquifers).QUOTE from the story" "With the condition of the plant, I question its ability to handle the extra sewage." ........just where will all the sewage get dump/treated and who will pay for it????....THE TAXPAYER

the already overburdoned aquafers on long island....the water supply that is vital to all of ling island (our natural aquafer is already overused, and getting more polluted(look at all the studies on the overusage of fertilizer on LI))......where will the extra water/purification of water come from???......THE TAXPAYER

the already overcrowed schools in uniondale/east meadow....uniondale and east meadow schools are overcrowed (especially since they were studid in the late 70's and early 80's with removing schools (like newbridge road school and mcleary jhs..and what did they do?? built more housing...big mistake).....so where would all the kids from these low-wage and luxury apartments go to school??........who is going to float that bond (and pay for it)for new schools?????..... THE TAXPAYER

the already overburdoned (and now possible facing cuts) Police dept...WHO will pay for this????...THE TAXPAYER

the already in red fire departments...the extra firemen, firehouse, trucks (to include a truck to handle a highrise)....where will that money come from??...THE TAX-PAYER

Mass transit...practicly non-existant on long island (mta is cutting back, lirr is cutting back)(and they say "express shuttle to the Mineola train station"....funny they didnt mention the CLOSER westbury station) so who will pay for this....THE TAXPAYER


or the fact the the construction jobs are just TEMPORARY, and all the actual jobs it creates are just LOW PAYING retail jobs....especially during a hurting (look at fortuneoff and macy's) economy
or the fact that it DOES NOT actually build a NEW colliseum, but just REFURBUSHES the old one.

THESE QUESTIONS ARE STILL NOT ANSWERED

more apartments equal more people, crime, water usage, sewer, garbage....that is FACT
where does the COST of more policemen/cars, firemen/trucks, garbagemen/trucks, electric lines and streetlamps, toilet sewage treatment, schools/treachers/buses come from......YOUR TAXES....that is FACT

DO you 'want' to take the chance to believe the SPIN from DEVELOPERS and INVESTORS REBULD A COLLISEUM, not this MONSTROSITY



more on rechler:
For Rechler, too, this has been a year of vanishing credit and too few tenants, struggles to pay contractors, dozens of layoffs and, last month, what he called a delayed payment on his construction loan for a luxury development in Baltimore.

Then the credit crunch really took hold. Last summer the partners missed a deadline to sell the bonds to build Bridgeport's Steel Point waterfront development, a long-awaited urban renewal effort for which the city had evicted residents. Another partner has taken over the project and is renegotiating the terms, said the city's economic development director, Donald Eversley. Rechler said he declined to exercise his option on the project when it was clear a bond issue would fail because of growing turmoil in the banking sector.

Closer to home, a bridge loan RexCorp had taken to help buy its tri-state-area suburban portfolio came due last summer, and Rechler said the banking crisis left him unable to refinance it. In swooped Normandy Real Estate Partners, a private-equity firm that likes to run the buildings it invests in -- and is among the lenders seeking to foreclose on the Hancock Tower. Normandy bought RexCorp's unpaid debt at 50 cents on the dollar, industry sources said, and assumed management control of a group of premium White Plains offices called the "Platinum Mile." Rechler insists this was a collaborative deal and he remains the managing member and is happy to have a new partner.

As the economy worsened, Rechler sold his stake in a major resort development at the old Concord and Grossinger's hotels in the Catskills. Last fall he persuaded the Village of North Hills in the Town of North Hempstead to give him a two-year extension on the Ritz-Carlton town-house development, which it had approved after a lengthy zoning battle.

But they are not giving mulligans in Baltimore, where Rechler had taken on another, nearly completed $250-million Ritz-Carlton development, on what he called distressed-asset terms, after the waning appetite for high-end luxury had already begun making itself felt. It opened last summer, but just 17 of its 192 condominiums had been logged as sold in Maryland state records last week -- Rechler puts the number at 21.

Liens, missed payments

Whatever the number, it's not enough. In September his builder, Bovis Lend Lease, filed a lien seeking $2.8 million; that case was closed a month later, Maryland court records show. Another lien, filed in August by Midtown Technologies, a smart-buildings contractor linked to Pfeffer, has remained active since August, records show. And last month, Rechler acknowledged, he missed a payment on his building loan.

Cameron Engineering senior partner Joseph Amato, meanwhile, said his Woodbury-based firm hasn't been paid yet for its work on the Ritz-Carltons in North Hills and Baltimore, but is proud of the Baltimore project and sure it will succeed.


rechler is not a good fit for this
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