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Old 04-08-2011, 12:37 PM
 
Location: Tri-State Area
2,919 posts, read 2,800,867 times
Reputation: 1739
Quote:
Originally Posted by ny789987 View Post
What? And getting a teaching certificate from Adelphi isn't?
Getting a certificate from a diploma mill is hardly an achievement.
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Old 04-08-2011, 01:21 PM
 
Location: Huntington
870 posts, read 1,679,084 times
Reputation: 447
Quote:
Originally Posted by ny789987 View Post
What? And getting a teaching certificate from Adelphi isn't?
Take it from someone who has a teaching degree - got it with hardly cracking a book open, and those educational textbooks are a far cry from a regular tough college course where you have to work your butt off to get just a B. I tacked the teaching degree on as a last minute decision since it was such an easy "major" - in parenthesis to emphasize the fact that it hardly qualifies as a serious major you actually have to work hard to earn.

Getting a teaching degree from anywhere is ridiculously easy - you pay your money, go through the motion of taking "educational" courses that anyone with an average IQ can pass with flying colors, write a couple of papers (still not needing the brainpower of an Einstein), and voila! you too can have a teaching "degree." A piece of paper stating you took and passed all those easy required education courses that teach you how to make a mountain out of a molehill worth of educational jargon.

So, yeah, I'd say an engineering degree - whether it be electrical, civil, mechanical, chemical, etc. - is a lot more difficult to earn than any teaching degree at any level.
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Old 04-08-2011, 01:32 PM
 
1,747 posts, read 1,168,880 times
Reputation: 1122
Most LI public schools require a Masters' degree so what difference does it make how easy it was for you to get a teaching certificate and then do nothing with it? Could you not get hired as a teacher and that's why you're so against them?
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Old 04-08-2011, 01:49 PM
 
219 posts, read 220,359 times
Reputation: 137
Quote:
Originally Posted by Interlude View Post
Current tax rates on the wealthiest in this country are the lowest they've been in recent history. Anyone old enough to remember the 70%+ bracket before Reagan and the 90%+ bracket before Johnson can tell you that. Plus, the rich pay a lower effective tax rate than the middle class. This is due to payroll taxes capping at $107k, deductions, and capital gains being taxed at a lower rate, among other things.

I can probably count the number of people in the 35% bracket (the current highest, who make over $372k - IE the top 1% of Americans) who post on this forum on one hand yet everyone fights as if they're already millionaires, advocating policies that benefit the rich at the expense of the middle class and poor. Politicans on both sides just squeeze through an extension of tax cuts that primarily benefitted this class, and are now crying poverty and trying to slash spending that benefits the poorest and weakest among us. Despicable.

Unfortunately, effective tax policy requires that a populace being taxed feels as if they are getting a valuable product from their tax dollars. Even more basically, it requires that they see the relationship in those terms. The US populace successfully has been bombarded for decades with unceasing propaganda which asserts that a dollar taxed is a dollar wasted. Appeals using examples of countries with aggressively progressive taxation - and all the benefits those countries derive from them - has already been checked by hilariously equating them with "socialism" (using the antediluvian specter of the USSR). Ethical or moral arguments - even simple appeals to fairness - meet a stoney audience. For the US at least empirical determination of an optimum taxation scheme is, for the most part, a moot topic.
Taxes like anything become part of a revenue stream, and once people depend on the revenue, its really hard to reverse these things...

You dont have to be rich to know whats fair and whats not fair...Its not correct to promote policies that benefit one group at the expense of another... and you cannot keep taking from one group to distribute the another... Unfortunately, most if not all of these programs benefit the poorest and weakest amongst us... Its a high profile target because it has the most money in it. When you keep adding programs on top of programs, eventually something has to be touched.

I think they are trying to repeal the MTA payroll tax... now I believe you would classify the people who benefit from the removal of this tax as the wealthy, but its a atax that shoudl have never been in the first place. Why should business owners have to pay for the MTA's bloated and underfunded pension liabilities... thats just bad management that people have to pick up the cost for... Oh and this is aside from ticket prices being 40% in the last 3 years.
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Old 04-08-2011, 01:58 PM
 
Location: NorthEast
774 posts, read 316,053 times
Reputation: 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaII View Post
Take it from someone who has a teaching degree - got it with hardly cracking a book open, and those educational textbooks are a far cry from a regular tough college course where you have to work your butt off to get just a B. I tacked the teaching degree on as a last minute decision since it was such an easy "major" - in parenthesis to emphasize the fact that it hardly qualifies as a serious major you actually have to work hard to earn.

Getting a teaching degree from anywhere is ridiculously easy - you pay your money, go through the motion of taking "educational" courses that anyone with an average IQ can pass with flying colors, write a couple of papers (still not needing the brainpower of an Einstein), and voila! you too can have a teaching "degree." A piece of paper stating you took and passed all those easy required education courses that teach you how to make a mountain out of a molehill worth of educational jargon.

So, yeah, I'd say an engineering degree - whether it be electrical, civil, mechanical, chemical, etc. - is a lot more difficult to earn than any teaching degree at any level.
The hardest part may be knowing someone so you may have a chance to get in the union!
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Old 04-08-2011, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Long Island
7,894 posts, read 2,380,860 times
Reputation: 1488
Quote:
Originally Posted by PreciousMonster View Post
More pension references. I'll try to find more to convince you guys.

You see no problem with a pension system that needs investment returns to account for 86% of it's income? That 20 year period was one of the best performance periods of the stock market and can not possibly continue. Obviously the model for teacher's pension along with NY State Employees model is in deep trouble as they have become completely dependent on stock market returns.

If the system is working so well why are taxpayers being asked to cover shortfalls?


New York State School Boards Association
"In aggregate, states’ systems were 84 percent funded, according to the Pew report. The researchers labeled this “a relatively positive outcome” since most pension experts agree that an 80 percent funding level is indicative of healthy funding progress.......

.....The numbers speak for themselves. Over a 20-year period ended June 30, 2010, TRS’ investment returns accounted for 86 percent of its income."



Schools Look to Delay Pain - WSJ.com

"A state measure that would allow school districts to defer $1 billion in pension payments over the next two years is gathering momentum in Albany.
The proposed legislation would give schools outside the city a short-term dose of fiscal relief that could help districts avoid teacher layoffs and other cutbacks. ..........

Sponsored by majority members in both houses, the bill gives districts the option of capping the percentage of their payrolls contributed to the teacher pension fund at 8.6% for two years. The actual figure is rising to 11% in the next school year."

So now taxpayers have to take out a loan to pay teachers pensions? The better solution would be to ask treachers to increase their donations to the pension system.
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Old 04-08-2011, 04:10 PM
 
Location: Centereach
427 posts, read 463,411 times
Reputation: 194
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottzilla View Post
let the adults talk please.

You must be a teacher.
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:19 PM
 
840 posts, read 1,096,459 times
Reputation: 303
Default Say what I want...

Quote:
Originally Posted by corky101 View Post
You must be a teacher.
Say what I want, says Corky, or I'll ridicule you. Keep going Cork!
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Old 04-08-2011, 05:24 PM
 
840 posts, read 1,096,459 times
Reputation: 303
Default How about this...

Quote:
Originally Posted by corky101 View Post
Well, it's a lot tougher to get an engineering degree than a teaching degree, lol.

you try it
It's a lot tougher to get a Chinese literature degree than an an engineering degree. It's a lot tougher to get a Ph.D. in dog catching than any business degree, but business degrees will make more money despite the fact that they will never produce a thing.

I think teacher pay is where it should be. I wish there was a mechanism for weeding out bad teachers that was fair. Because I don't think it can be done, I'd much rather make sure they are all paid well in order to reward the deserving ones than to undercompensate initiative by low-balling everyone.
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Old 04-08-2011, 06:40 PM
 
924 posts, read 1,045,208 times
Reputation: 525
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottzilla View Post
Is an engineer supposed to make more money than a teacher?
Why?
The only reason should be supply and demand. If Engineers are in more demand and there exists a lack of supply, then they should be paid more. There exists an oversupply of teachers on Long Island, so they should be paid accordingly or else you have an abundance of people who want to become teachers because the spot an arbitrage opportunity. That is what currently exists on Long Island.

Everyone wants to become a teacher because they realize that the job pays way more then it should naturally. Want proof? Look at what the private schools pay. Those teachers need to have the exact same education/certification and they make 1/2 what union teachers are paid.
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