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Old 07-27-2011, 12:05 PM
 
95 posts, read 303,589 times
Reputation: 90

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Quote:
Originally Posted by LIR View Post
I am lucky enough to not have been excessed this year, but many of my fellow teachers throughout LI were excessed. State law says that the district MUST offer jobs to these teachers first if and when positions open up in the next seven years. Therefore, the likelihood of a probationary teaching position opening up to a candidate who has not previously worked for the district is slim.

In my district, the new hires these past couple of years have come from either the excessed teacher pool and then the substitute pool. For the most part, they were either leave replacements or permanent subs for at least a year and worked as hard as they could to leave a good impression on the principals.

For those posters who commented on the size of pensions, please be aware that there are currently five tiers in the pension system. The majority of current retirees are from the original top tiers, and are entitled to a greater % pension than the other tiers will ever see. For instance, I just plugged in my info into the pension website, and when I retire 27 years from now, with 34 years of service, my pension still won't be six figures. So the size of pensions is actually going to decrease over time as a result of much of the current and future workforce being subject to different pension rules than the present retirees.
Well since they are lowering everything, I hope they lower our property taxes too!
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Old 07-27-2011, 04:54 PM
 
395 posts, read 883,860 times
Reputation: 236
The problems I see with teachers and what is going on is two fold. First, I remember this all started about 5-8 years ago, when EVERYBODY and their mother wanted to be a teacher. That is when the salaries really started going up, and the fact that you had summers off, every holiday off, you basically only worked 9 months out of the year and so on.

This led to an enormous amount of people (young and old) going back to school for a plethora of teaching subjects, from art to history to liberal arts to bio. My sister and sister in law were two people who did this. It's like every other person you run into is a teacher, or wants to be a teacher.

Well, eventually in these past 5 years the jobs were gobbled up, and now there are no more, so you have all of the rest of these people with college degrees that can't use them and up to their eyes in college debt. What can you do with an art or history degree besides teach? Work in a museum? And even there, there are only a limited number of jobs, and I think to be a curator or head of a certain wing or dept. you need a Ph.D because they do intense research.

That is why now you have 10 or 20 ppl applying for every 1 teaching spot. It's rough out there if you are a teacher. The only thing I can say is try the city. Areas of Brooklyn, the Bronx and certain schools in Manhattan are hiring.
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Old 07-27-2011, 05:58 PM
 
4,245 posts, read 3,198,126 times
Reputation: 2965
[quote=Logical95;20206058]The problems I see with teachers and what is going on is two fold. First, I remember this all started about 5-8 years ago, when EVERYBODY and their mother wanted to be a teacher. That is when the salaries really started going up, and the fact that you had summers off, every holiday off, you basically only worked 9 months out of the year and so on.

This led to an enormous amount of people (young and old) going back to school for a plethora of teaching subjects, from art to history to liberal arts to bio. My sister and sister in law were two people who did this. It's like every other person you run into is a teacher, or wants to be a teacher.

Well, eventually in these past 5 years the jobs were gobbled up, and now there are no more, so you have all of the rest of these people with college degrees that can't use them and up to their eyes in college debt. What can you do with an art or history degree besides teach? Work in a museum? And even there, there are only a limited number of jobs, and I think to be a curator or head of a certain wing or dept. you need a Ph.D because they do intense research.

That is why now you have 10 or 20 ppl applying for every 1 teaching spot. It's rough out there if you are a teacher. The only thing I can say is try the city. Areas of Brooklyn, the Bronx and certain schools in Manhattan are hiring.[/quo
I understand over 200 fully qualified teachers apply for every teaching position. Again, consider that the uncertain economy has slowed the retirement rate and caused school disricts to CUT positions. And we have declining enrollment at the lowest grades. All three trendes are likely to continue...I suspect that 200 figure will shortly double.
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Old 07-28-2011, 05:54 PM
 
Location: Holbrook
7 posts, read 38,330 times
Reputation: 20
When my wife graduated from St Josephs college they actually had a special meeting AFTER the graduation ceremony where they explained to all the students (teachers) that they were going to have to leave Long Island if they wanted to find a job... It was a great way to ruin her day.

Since then I paid for her to get her masters degree in a specialized field of teaching, which landed her a job. I'd recommend the same for anyone looking to teach on LI.

I know someone thatgot terrible grades and was/is on a slew of meds during college and got a teaching job right out of college... This person's mother taught for the district already... you can figure it out.
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Old 07-29-2011, 12:31 PM
 
1 posts, read 14,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Logical95 View Post
The problems I see with teachers and what is going on is two fold. First, I remember this all started about 5-8 years ago, when EVERYBODY and their mother wanted to be a teacher. That is when the salaries really started going up, and the fact that you had summers off, every holiday off, you basically only worked 9 months out of the year and so on.

This led to an enormous amount of people (young and old) going back to school for a plethora of teaching subjects, from art to history to liberal arts to bio. My sister and sister in law were two people who did this. It's like every other person you run into is a teacher, or wants to be a teacher.
You are very wrong in many respects. New York State has strict regulations for who can become teachers and what sort of programs they must go through. Liberal Art, English, Art History majors etc do not qualify to be teachers in this day in age. One must complete a State certified education programs and complete a Masters within a certain period of teaching. It is not as easy as it used to be. English majors with 4 year bachelors are not qualified to teach any longer. It is no longer possible in NY State , long lists of Educational Pedagogy and psychology courses are now required and most newer teacher have two or three certifications.

So while it may seems younger teachers may struggle to find jobs that might not be the case. I am in a Masters program in Education here on LI and have seen a few students just recently get jobs. Newer teachers are more tech savvy, have more education (all come with masters-sometimes 2), have more certifications and are willing to take less money then teachers in the "pool". So while it seems like they aren't hiring that simply isn't true. You just have to make yourself marketable and network.
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Old 07-30-2011, 07:48 AM
 
Location: Sarasota-Manatee, Florida
407 posts, read 778,846 times
Reputation: 182
I was taking a look at these postings and I know that finding teaching jobs on LI is difficult. I just started my first year of college this year and majoring in Music Education. I was hoping that a few years from now the economy will change. Maybe not... But what kind of teachers (subject area) have the best luck of finding jobs? I heard special ed but that even seems unsure.
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Old 07-30-2011, 08:12 AM
 
156 posts, read 427,821 times
Reputation: 98
It would be hard to name just one subject that is the 'best' one right now. It seems to go in cycles, and as soon as a need opens up people jump to quickly get certified in those areas. A few years ago math was 'the' certification to have. Now there are very few jobs in it.

From my experiences, if you have multiple certifications (chemistry and physics, spanish and french) you will stand a better chance of getting a job. A lot of people are doing special ed with their subject areas (I am math and special ed). The worst choice is elementary ed. Most of the people that I have met in my classes that do not have jobs are either elem ed or early childhood. It's even hard to find those jobs in the city. Another decent certification is ESL. In the city there are a lot of jobs in that area.
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Old 07-30-2011, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Holbrook
7 posts, read 38,330 times
Reputation: 20
You need a specialty degree to have the best chances to get in. Minoring in Spanish would be a great idea as districts like Central Islip require new applicants to be bilingual.

ABA for autistic children is a great path if you'd like to secure a job, as are a few others. Ask around and teachers will be able to tell you which positions a district is having a hard time fulfilling.
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Old 07-30-2011, 06:00 PM
 
4,245 posts, read 3,198,126 times
Reputation: 2965
Quote:
Originally Posted by ligrl8 View Post
You are very wrong in many respects. New York State has strict regulations for who can become teachers and what sort of programs they must go through. Liberal Art, English, Art History majors etc do not qualify to be teachers in this day in age. One must complete a State certified education programs and complete a Masters within a certain period of teaching. It is not as easy as it used to be. English majors with 4 year bachelors are not qualified to teach any longer. It is no longer possible in NY State , long lists of Educational Pedagogy and psychology courses are now required and most newer teacher have two or three certifications.

So while it may seems younger teachers may struggle to find jobs that might not be the case. I am in a Masters program in Education here on LI and have seen a few students just recently get jobs. Newer teachers are more tech savvy, have more education (all come with masters-sometimes 2), have more certifications and are willing to take less money then teachers in the "pool". So while it seems like they aren't hiring that simply isn't true. You just have to make yourself marketable and network.
You may need to call around to a few of the larger districts here on Long Island and ask them if they have hired ANY teachers at all this year. Given the slow down in retirements, budget related layoffs , and declining enrollment the few students you know who were hired may have been the exception and not the rule. The school district I live in (medium sized, approx 3600 students) laid off over 20 teachers and hired 0 teachers.
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Old 07-30-2011, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Sarasota-Manatee, Florida
407 posts, read 778,846 times
Reputation: 182
I remember math being "the certification to have" a few years back. Its difficult for me because majoring in music ed there is no special ed adea for that in many districts.
I thought about moving out State but think that almost the whole country is having difficulties finding jobs.
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