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Old 07-16-2011, 03:59 PM
 
1,149 posts, read 927,487 times
Reputation: 313
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdcnret View Post
ATVs are required to be registered in NYS, but it's not the same as a car or motorcycle registration. ATVs -- registered or not -- are not permitted to be operated on local public roadways. Emergency or not.
thats not what the new york state law says in the link i provided.
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Old 07-16-2011, 04:43 PM
 
1,149 posts, read 927,487 times
Reputation: 313
Motorcycles are small and difficult to see as they approach you from the opposing direction or from the side. Motorcycles can accelerate very quickly and can make extremely fast maneuvers. The driver has virtually no protection against injury during a crash.

When sharing the road with a motorcycle, first you need to know they are there. Motorcycles can overtake you quickly from behind. Search for motorcycles at all times, especially before changing lanes, turning, or passing.

Scan your mirrors for the presence of an approaching motorcycle by looking for a single headlight. Often, you might hear a motorcycle before you see it.

Because motorcycles are small, it is more difficult to judge their speed. Before changing lanes or maneuvering your vehicle, check the speed of the motorcycle - be sure you and the motorcycle are not about to merge into the same space.

Motorcycles have small mirrors. If you are behind or to the side, do not assume the motorcyclist sees you.

Motorcycles take up a small amount of space in the lane, but they need every bit of the lane in case they need to make a fast, evasive maneuver. Anticipate sudden movements, swerving, and quick lane changes without signals.

Give the motorcyclist plenty of space and increase that space when the condition of the road is rough, irregular, or slippery as the result of inclement weather.

When being passed by a motorcycle, maintain your lane position and prepare to adjust your speed to let them in front of you. If you see a motorcycle rapidly overtaking you from the rear, maintain your lane position until it passes. Don’t try to change lanes.
Motorcycle riders are afforded the same rights as all other drivers on the road, and must follow the same rules as other drivers (§ 1250).
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Old 07-17-2011, 08:13 AM
 
938 posts, read 961,191 times
Reputation: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matzah Pizza View Post
thats not what the new york state law says in the link i provided.
The link you provided is to an ATV brochure, not the actual law. Check Section 2403 of the New York State Vehicle and Traffic Laws. With two very narrow and limited exceptions, ATVs cannot be operated on public highways. Period.

Last edited by pdcnret; 07-17-2011 at 09:34 AM..
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Old 07-17-2011, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Lynbrook
517 posts, read 1,646,309 times
Reputation: 299
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY Annie View Post

The truth is: the majority of people who ride bikes do not adhere to the laws.

The truth is: most speed (as do most drivers).

The truth is: most have no consideration for the fact that even a minor accident on a motor bike/cycle/bicycle can result in injuries far exceeding any in a 2 car collision.
I disagree with your so called truths here. It is a gross generalization on your part. As someone who does ride, I really don't speed for the simple fact that its not all that enjoyable. Perhaps those who ride sport bikes enjoy just going fast, but for me and the folks I have ridden with we prefer the more leisurely cruise and generally don't like to ride on major highways unless there is no viable alternative. Its basically the difference between driving to get somewhere and riding to just enjoy the ride.

As for having no consideration for my own potential injuries...that's just a ridiculous statement. Most motorcyclists do not have a death wish. I've been in an accident on a motorcycle, as I said in a previous post. Even though my accident was thankfully minor, there's no way I would ride around carelessly thinking I'm invincible because I know what can happen all too well. If anything, I've seen much more dangerous driving on the part of people in cars because they ARE less likely to be seriously injured.
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Old 07-17-2011, 03:32 PM
 
1,149 posts, read 927,487 times
Reputation: 313
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdcnret View Post
The link you provided is to an ATV brochure, not the actual law. Check Section 2403 of the New York State Vehicle and Traffic Laws. With two very narrow and limited exceptions, ATVs cannot be operated on public highways. Period.
was told you are permitted during emergencies such as snow storms, which I have seen plenty of riders doing so.
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Old 07-17-2011, 06:18 PM
 
938 posts, read 961,191 times
Reputation: 488
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matzah Pizza View Post
was told you are permitted during emergencies such as snow storms, which I have seen plenty of riders doing so.
You were told wrong. Just because everyone's doing it, doesn't mean it's legal.
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Old 07-17-2011, 08:25 PM
 
Location: New York
208 posts, read 216,037 times
Reputation: 65
Quote:
Originally Posted by pdcnret View Post
You were told wrong. Just because everyone's doing it, doesn't mean it's legal.
nothings legal in This place i Had a Cop Giving me Crap today
because my friend had a Walkie Talkie After Giving out tickets because Cars werin"t between The Parking Lines
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Old 07-18-2011, 08:54 AM
 
228 posts, read 307,392 times
Reputation: 94
Every time I see these lunatics doing wheelies and racing in and out of traffic, my heart is in my throat
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Old 07-18-2011, 09:08 AM
 
7,224 posts, read 7,097,956 times
Reputation: 2797
Yeah, I despise these d-bags. I don't care if you want to kill yourself being a childish tough guy. It's when you lose control of your bike and your worthless tatooed body with tap-out t-shirt flies through the front window of some minivan heading the other way on the Southern State and you kill some little kid, then I care.

We have a surplus of grown men behaving like 12 year olds in this country. You can't blame the police because how can they catch these guys? This is another argument for camera driven speed enforcement.
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Old 07-18-2011, 09:09 AM
 
7,224 posts, read 7,097,956 times
Reputation: 2797
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matzah Pizza View Post
Motorcycles are small and difficult to see as they approach you from the opposing direction or from the side. Motorcycles can accelerate very quickly and can make extremely fast maneuvers. The driver has virtually no protection against injury during a crash.

When sharing the road with a motorcycle, first you need to know they are there. Motorcycles can overtake you quickly from behind. Search for motorcycles at all times, especially before changing lanes, turning, or passing.

Scan your mirrors for the presence of an approaching motorcycle by looking for a single headlight. Often, you might hear a motorcycle before you see it.

Because motorcycles are small, it is more difficult to judge their speed. Before changing lanes or maneuvering your vehicle, check the speed of the motorcycle - be sure you and the motorcycle are not about to merge into the same space.

Motorcycles have small mirrors. If you are behind or to the side, do not assume the motorcyclist sees you.

Motorcycles take up a small amount of space in the lane, but they need every bit of the lane in case they need to make a fast, evasive maneuver. Anticipate sudden movements, swerving, and quick lane changes without signals.

Give the motorcyclist plenty of space and increase that space when the condition of the road is rough, irregular, or slippery as the result of inclement weather.

When being passed by a motorcycle, maintain your lane position and prepare to adjust your speed to let them in front of you. If you see a motorcycle rapidly overtaking you from the rear, maintain your lane position until it passes. Don’t try to change lanes.
Motorcycle riders are afforded the same rights as all other drivers on the road, and must follow the same rules as other drivers (§ 1250).
More often than not it's the motorcycle riders who are putting themselves and other people in danger by acting like fools and breaking the law.
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