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Old 06-29-2016, 07:16 AM
 
87 posts, read 82,852 times
Reputation: 60

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It's June of 2016, and the other afternoon I noticed a man with a truck changing bulbs inside the stanchion lights on our neighborhood streets, in Seaford, Town of Hempstead. In the dark of the night, it is obvious that the new lights are LED's., as promised by the Town of Hempstead website, linked HERE.
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That sent me to find this thread from 2011.
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Just some general observations:
1) The eight streets around us were part of a development of an empty field in 1952. As was done other places at that time, the power lines went through backyards, and underground cables went to curbside lights on metal stanchions. When we arrived here in 1972, the lights were incandescent. By 1990 or so, the insulation on the underground wires had deteriorated so much that voltage was leaking. New wires were laid and the poles were replaced. At some point the incandescents were replaced by sodium vapor lights, whether low or high pressure, I don't know. LED's replaced these this final week of June, 2016.
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2) Maybe a year ago, LED's replaced the previous lighting on Sunrise Highway through Wantagh and Seaford. Similar LED's are now on utility poles on most streets that do not have separate light stanchions. They can be spotted during the daytime because the bottom of the lamp now appears flat instead of a roundish globe.
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3) Only a few years ago, a person traveling east on Merrick Road or Sunrise Highway, leaving the Town of Hempstead and entering the Town of Oyster Bay met highway lighting too closely resembling the amber (or yellow) traffic signal light that is displayed between green and red. During those years, it was somewhat difficult to notice an amber caution light, as it was mixed in with the surrounding street lights. I presume that the street lights were sodium vapor.
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4) In the 1950's, the state parkways near Jones Beach used a sodium vapor horizontal tube. Whether Mr. Moses had these installed as anti-fog lights, I don't know, but they certainly were distinctive.
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5) I wonder what year it was when the Town of Hempstead entered the business of street lighting.
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Old 06-29-2016, 10:51 AM
 
Location: Kings Park, NY
1,440 posts, read 2,188,678 times
Reputation: 707
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckthedog View Post
I'm starting to see them in a few spots, and I'm undecided about them.

Most street lights are high pressure sodium lamps, they give off that bright orange light. Some neighborhoods are still using mercury vapor lighting, which is gives off the whitish-bluish light. Most places went to HPS because they give off a better light.

Anywho, to the point here, a newer technology, called inductive lighting is coming on the scene. the lamps look like fluroescent lamps in the shape of a donought. These use a lot less energy, but IMO give off a much poorer light. I noticed them on Commack Rd, by Pilgrim State. They barely light up the road it seems.

When do we stop trading energy saving for effectiveness?
Really? I must be blind considering I pass this every day. I'll have to look and see.
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Old 06-29-2016, 11:46 AM
 
97 posts, read 150,184 times
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They are horrible and blinding.

The color temperature is just awful.
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Old 06-29-2016, 04:43 PM
 
56 posts, read 87,833 times
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Default Soft White?

I'm in Seaford and I'm not happy with the new LED lights on the local back streets. My street has approximately 16 lights and two have been replaced with the new LED lights.
The problem with the LED it is much too white. The new lights feels as if I should be in an industrial area and not a neighborhood.
Why can't the lens of the LED light be yellow? like a soft white incandescent light bulb.
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Old 06-29-2016, 05:29 PM
 
1,140 posts, read 862,109 times
Reputation: 705
Quote:
Originally Posted by ArchDesigner View Post
I'm in Seaford and I'm not happy with the new LED lights on the local back streets. My street has approximately 16 lights and two have been replaced with the new LED lights.
The problem with the LED it is much too white. The new lights feels as if I should be in an industrial area and not a neighborhood.
Why can't the lens of the LED light be yellow? like a soft white incandescent light bulb.
Valley Stream just went all LED and it's proven controversial. I don't see what the fuss is about. I like them. I'm also all LED in my house. The lens of an LED can be whatever you want it to be. The ones in my house look incandescent. The ones on the street are pretty white, but the light is focused onto the street and doesn't disrupt my house or my property. I like it.
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Old 07-01-2016, 10:17 AM
 
87 posts, read 82,852 times
Reputation: 60
Last night I went for a walk to see the illumination provided by the new LEDs the Town of Hempstead is installing in Seaford and Wantagh. I was surprised that the new lights long the west side of Oakland Avenue south of Sunrise Hwy illuminate only half the width of the street. Southbound traffic is illuminated. Northbound and the east sidewalks are dark. Then I walked along Seaford Avenue near Alan Drive. I was surprised that the lights along the southwest side of Seaford Avenue do a full job of illumination, including brightness on both sidewalks. Because Seaford Avenue has few curb trees, I went back and checked Oakland Avenue for tree shadow. No problem from the trees. Then along Woodward Avenue, Wantagh, west of Oakland Avenue I found older sodium vapor lamps, globed, and emitting a pinkish light. I don't know whether they are low or high pressure. They illuminate a spot in the center of the street, with no defined edge. Sidewalks are not bright, but sufficiently illumined.
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This morning, I discovered that the number of LEDs on the Seaford Avenue lights are about double the number of LEDs in the lights above Oakland Avenue. No wonder that Oakland Avenue is only half-illuminated.

IMG_0022 by sphoto33, on Flickr

IMG_0021 by sphoto33, on Flickr

IMG_0020 by sphoto33, on Flickr

Last edited by Joe63; 07-01-2016 at 10:59 AM.. Reason: Add photos.
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