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Old 01-25-2012, 10:23 PM
 
Location: Inis Fada
13,407 posts, read 14,553,752 times
Reputation: 4323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crookhaven View Post
Theres 2 versions.
I forgot about that one -- yeppers, that's him.


SUFFOLK COUNTY STATE OF MIND (Official Version) from John Mingione
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Old 01-25-2012, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Massapequa Park
3,173 posts, read 3,065,901 times
Reputation: 1307
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
It's the south shore accent which people stereotype Lawn Guylanders with. (Think Buttafuoco) Most north shore folks (born, or relocated here from somewhere other than the 5 boroughs) do not sound as crass.

2008 Newsday had a lengthy Part II story about the Lawn Guyland aksent and how it varies depending upon where one lives on LI, where one (or one's parents) were from, etc. It was an interesting read which I mailed to my friend in CA who has lost his Lawn Guyland aksent after living out there for 20+ years. Then again, he was from Plainview and attended Catholic school with students from all over LI. He never really had a terrible aksent (a few dropper Rs) because was steeping in it like those of us in Matzohpizza.
You don't need an LI Accent to sound crass, dahling.
Racist killer goes free - YouTube Miller Place? North Brookhaven. Elegance.

I know plenty of people from all parts of the island with a slight LI accent.
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Old 01-25-2012, 11:02 PM
 
Location: Massapequa Park
3,173 posts, read 3,065,901 times
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Just want to add something. I know a boatload of people from Central and West Nassau that have some sort of LI accent.Even some on the No Shore. It's allover Suffolk, too. It's obviously not as prevalent on the North Shore, old money, fancy pants WASP colonies. But it's everywhere in mainstream LI. Not defending the south shore, because it's alive and well here, but I think you're way off base trying to pinpoint it to one location. Unless you think everyone from Brooklyn/Queens that created (or morphed)into what is today's LI accent, ONLY moved to south shore nassau? Absurd.
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Old 01-25-2012, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Inis Fada
13,407 posts, read 14,553,752 times
Reputation: 4323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pequaman View Post
You don't need an LI Accent to sound crass, dahling.
Racist killer goes free - YouTube Miller Place? North Brookhaven. Elegance.

I know plenty of people from all parts of the island with a slight LI accent. Plainedge doesn't represent the entire south shore.
Pequa, think about who you're getting defensive with. A fellow Pequan. I call my Seaford in-laws on the phone -- accent. Meet with her Nassau Shores SIL and more accent. My friends since childhood in Massapequa Park -- accent. My old neighbors in N Massapequa -- accent. My sister's in-laws (Seaford) accent. My MIL (originally Merrick) accent. My HS classmates -- who've remained relatively local -- accent.

And it is different from the accent my born and raised on the north shore children have. I saw bawl, the say ball. I try not to say cawfee, the say coffee.

Someone posted the Newsday article I referred to earlier in it's entirety on this website:
Tawkin Lawn Guy Land

Quote:
The odd thing about Long Islandese is that it doesn't actually exist - not as an entity distinct from old-time New York City speech. Dialect recapitulates history, and the sounds of the city's eastward suburbs - those twanging nasals, the diphthong drawl in "man," the A's of "call," "talk" and "mall" larded with W's - chronicle the great postwar migration eastward from Flatbush, Bushwick and Williamsburg.

"If you really want to hear a ripe Brooklyn accent, you go to Long Island," says Amy Stoller, a Manhattan-based dialect coach. Listen to a group of Massapequa teenagers, who wouldn't even know from Ebbets Field, and you can hear the echo of their stickball-playing grandparents. If those kids sound nothing like a clique from the next town over, it probably has less to do with geography than with ethnicity.

There are at least four different strands of New York-area accents, broadly defined by tribe: Italian, Jewish, Irish and Hispanic (the latecomethis dialectal stew). Blacks have adopted features of all these strains, but the strongest form of dialect, formally known as African-American Vernacular English, sounds much the same in New York as it does in Baltimore, Chicago and Los Angeles.
Growing up in the area in the 70's & 80's I was surrounded by Italians and Jews whose families came out here from Brooklyn. As the article states, the accent most likely has much more to do with ethnicity. My children aren't around many former Brooklynite Italian and Jewish families unlike me.


To address your deflection:
Daniel Cicciaro (sp?) was from Terryville; he was murdered in Miller Place by Mr. White. Terryville isn't known for being high-falutin'. They moved into a new house there a couple of years before Daniel was murdered. Isn't Cicciaro an Italian last name? Could they have been from, or have been raised around Brooklyn born Italians?

The thread was intended to be humorous, not aksents. Let's try to turn this back in that direction, please?
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Old 01-25-2012, 11:29 PM
 
Location: Massapequa Park
3,173 posts, read 3,065,901 times
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OBH, read my previous post. I'm not getting defensive. Maybe a little surprised at your naivete on LI accents. It's a funny thread, but I seriously think you're having one of your rare non-OBH moments and exhibiting a break down of common sense. Just because the article cited Massapequa and you know a few people on SS that have it, does not mean it's "the south shore Nassau accent"?. I have plenty of family and friends that have nothing to do with south shore Nassau, that have heavier Long Island accents than most people on the South Shore. South of 25A (minus areas like Hempstead, Garden City and the like), it's prevalent everywhere.
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Old 01-26-2012, 05:52 AM
 
26 posts, read 3,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Crookhaven View Post
No Fitty didnt move here.

His ex and his son had a house in Dix Hills, but apparently she burned it down. LOL
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Old 01-26-2012, 06:41 AM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
8,392 posts, read 8,952,222 times
Reputation: 4567
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
And it is different from the accent my born and raised on the north shore children have. I saw bawl, the say ball. I try not to say cawfee, the say coffee.

?
I agree. When I went to college, whenever anyone would express surprise that I was from Long Island (including fellow LIers) my Massapequa born-and-bred friend would say "that's because she's from the nawth shaw". No one ever mistook where she was from!

Whenever one of us goes off the rails and starts tawking with too much of an accent, another of us will say "that was so south shaw - watch it!"
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Old 01-26-2012, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
13,407 posts, read 14,553,752 times
Reputation: 4323
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pequaman View Post
OBH, read my previous post. I'm not getting defensive. Maybe a little surprised at your naivete on LI accents. It's a funny thread, but I seriously think you're having one of your rare non-OBH moments and exhibiting a break down of common sense. OUCH! Just because the article cited Massapequa and you know a few people on SS that have it, does not mean it's "the south shore Nassau accent"?. I have plenty of family and friends that have nothing to do with south shore Nassau, that have heavier Long Island accents than most people on the South Shore. South of 25A (minus areas like Hempstead, Garden City and the like), it's prevalent everywhere.
We are tawkin about the same thing from two different perspectives.

I narrowed down by focusing on a specific area -- south shore Nassau -- while you looked at the big overview picture -- LI accents.

If you placed me in a room with 50 people from my neighborhood who have lived on the north shore their entire lives and had us all say ball, wall, coffee, seltzer, water, dog, you would pick me off in a minute.

If you placed anyone from LI in a room with 50 people from upstate and had them all recite those same words, the LIer would stand apart -- whether they were from Massapequa, Huntington, Setauket or Patchogue.
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Old 01-26-2012, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
13,407 posts, read 14,553,752 times
Reputation: 4323
Quote:
Originally Posted by twingles View Post
I agree. When I went to college, whenever anyone would express surprise that I was from Long Island (including fellow LIers) my Massapequa born-and-bred friend would say "that's because she's from the nawth shaw". No one ever mistook where she was from!

Whenever one of us goes off the rails and starts tawking with too much of an accent, another of us will say "that was so south shaw - watch it!"
That was my point -- the accent changes as one moves across the Island.
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Old 01-26-2012, 08:21 AM
 
Location: Smithtown, NY
1,235 posts, read 1,327,321 times
Reputation: 642
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pequaman View Post
OBH, read my previous post. I'm not getting defensive. Maybe a little surprised at your naivete on LI accents. It's a funny thread, but I seriously think you're having one of your rare non-OBH moments and exhibiting a break down of common sense. Just because the article cited Massapequa and you know a few people on SS that have it, does not mean it's "the south shore Nassau accent"?. I have plenty of family and friends that have nothing to do with south shore Nassau, that have heavier Long Island accents than most people on the South Shore. South of 25A (minus areas like Hempstead, Garden City and the like), it's prevalent everywhere.
Holy thin skin Batman.
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