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Old 10-19-2012, 08:43 PM
 
74 posts, read 300,281 times
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Default Wave ventilation system for basement

Wondering if anyone here has replaced their dehumidifier with a wave ventilation system? If so are you happy with it. Seems like a lot of money and wondering if it works well?
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Old 10-23-2012, 09:47 AM
 
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Wow, no replies on the Wave Ventilation system....

My basement, while dry (ie., no leaks or standing water), had a moisture problem causing odors and mildew. The dehumidifier was run night and day during the humid summer months, adding expense to the already astronomical LIPA bill. This was with an energy star rated dehumidifier, but it was still like running an extra air conditioner.

My problem was the basement had been finished by slapping drywall over faced fiberglass batting, with no vapor barrier between the poured concrete foundation and the materials. I ripped down the drywall and trashed the stinky batting. What happens is moisture from the foundation seeps into the batting, which is great for mold and mildew, since it's cool and dark.

After demo'g the walls, I covered all of the concrete surfaces with 3/4" EPS, including the floor. The seams on the EPS were sealed using wrap tape. On the walls, 3" unfaced batting was inserted into the stud cavity and on the floor, two layers of 1/2" plywood were used as a sheathing. I sealed every gap in the drywall with closed-cell foam or caulk.

Today, the basement is as warm as the rest of the house, totally odor free. In the winter, it provides a heating benefit, since the cool air from basement is not being sucked up through-out the house. It's warmer during the summer as well, but the mildewy smell is not present and humidity is far lower.

Yes, it's a big job and yes, it's messy. But it's cost-effective and can be done by anyone who can sheetrock.
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Old 10-25-2012, 04:41 AM
 
74 posts, read 300,281 times
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Thanks but that does not answer my question about purchasing a wave ventilation system at www.mydryhome.com. I too spend a ton running the dehumidifier and was considering purchasing one of these but they are very costly.
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Old 10-25-2012, 07:39 AM
 
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I've been considering getting one of these units, but have yet to get a quote. Have you gotten a quote yet? I'd be interested in knowing how much they are going for. Thanks.
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:20 AM
 
237 posts, read 421,286 times
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Check out This Old House thread on the wave ventilation system.

https://advice.thisoldhouse.com/showthread.php?t=7497

It looks like you can build your own system for $200. or less.
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:20 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sseligson View Post
Thanks but that does not answer my question about purchasing a wave ventilation system at www.mydryhome.com. I too spend a ton running the dehumidifier and was considering purchasing one of these but they are very costly.
Nope, you're right, I did not answer your question about the Wave Ventilation system. But I think I addressed the same problem you're having, that is creating a dryer environment in your basement. Ventilation systems work by evacuating moist air, but if you're pulling in more moist air, what's the difference. Insulating the basement and adding a moisture barrier will create a dryer environment.

Any way, if you google the product, you'll find people who have researched it and come up with their own ventilation systems at a fraction of the cost.

Good luck.
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Old 10-25-2012, 08:32 AM
 
170 posts, read 228,987 times
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Can you use a window A/C as a dehumidifier in a basement?
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Old 10-25-2012, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Island of long
3,535 posts, read 5,800,512 times
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Stop the moisture from coming in...

1) Extend all gutters away from house
2) Build up soil and slope it away from house
3) Put 2 coats of dry lock over all the walls and floor

This will fix your problems...unless you have a underground river or spring directly under your house.
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Old 10-25-2012, 03:57 PM
 
1,548 posts, read 1,900,404 times
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Here is one video and there are some more on Youtube

Wave Home Solutions - Wave Ventilation (long version) - YouTube
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Old 10-25-2012, 06:00 PM
 
1,073 posts, read 1,087,450 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocafeller05 View Post
Stop the moisture from coming in...

1) Extend all gutters away from house
2) Build up soil and slope it away from house
3) Put 2 coats of dry lock over all the walls and floor

This will fix your problems...unless you have a underground river or spring directly under your house.
You advice is good. Many basements on LI are just damp, mildewy and moldy because the concrete used for cinder block or poured foundation never really dries out. If your external foundation was back-filled with clay and hard-scrabble dirt, the moisture that is present will not go very far.

Dry-loc has its fans and it's detractors. I've heard it will fail in situations with hydro-static pressure and under normal situations, it traps water in the concrete where it stays, degrading the concrete.

If you check the latest building codes, the best way to go is with a foam layer right on the concrete. Since it's not totally impermeable, moisture can evaporate, but it still functions as a vapor block.
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