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Old 05-06-2013, 06:44 AM
 
1,610 posts, read 4,012,531 times
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At least in New York it is.Another way to afford all the expenses needs to be found if the average home owner is to be able to keep his home.One way is to merge school districts and share utility's like buses and ground maintenance equipment,teaching aids and equipment,Special teachers could serve adjoining schools, school buildings and fields for sports etc.It is already beyond many owners means as can be seen by many posts that state this fact.Hopefully others will post ideas here to stop the mass moving out of homes folks have worked all their lives to afford.Other ways have to be found SOON!
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Old 05-06-2013, 07:03 AM
 
1,740 posts, read 2,962,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qlty View Post
At least in New York it is.Another way to afford all the expenses needs to be found if the average home owner is to be able to keep his home.One way is to merge school districts and share utility's like buses and ground maintenance equipment,teaching aids and equipment,Special teachers could serve adjoining schools, school buildings and fields for sports etc.It is already beyond many owners means as can be seen by many posts that state this fact.Hopefully others will post ideas here to stop the mass moving out of homes folks have worked all their lives to afford.Other ways have to be found SOON!
Although I agree, It will never happen. L.I. residence are so caught up in being in the best school districts. They will do everything to protect the schools and the value of there homes. Hence the reason why the taxes are so high.
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Old 05-06-2013, 07:10 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,833 posts, read 29,141,302 times
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I just recently went over my school district's budget and found that the cost for health insurance rises by $2 million dollars each year. The teachers contribute 15% toward their health insurance ($300,000) leaving the district's taxpayers to cover the remaining $1.7 million. The figures I saw were for 3 consecutive budgets which = $5,100,000 burden on the taxpayers just for health insurance (not including dental.)

If the amount teachers were to contribute was increased by $200/month ($2,400/year) based upon the number of teachers in the district, we would save the $2 million and be able to apply it to maintaining courses as opposed to cutting them. It would preserve teaching jobs. Why does it feel (to me) like teachers would rather throw their peers under the bus as opposed to making a larger contribution and saving their peers jobs?

Going over the budget, teacher salaries and benefits made up over 55% of the budget. Given contractual obligations -- raises, step increases, increases to health care, etc., salaries and benefits will consumer larger portions of the budget in years to come. Add to it unfunded mandates and the exorbitant expense to convert to the Common Core, LI taxpayers will be in for a world of hurt -- nothing that mergers could substantially offset.
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Old 05-06-2013, 07:38 AM
 
3,574 posts, read 3,809,942 times
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This topic comes up again and again.

No money saved by merging systems would truly offset any tax bases.
Also once your tax dollar crosses another district line, federal rights for the student to go to the school of their choosing (if they are in a failing or minority majority school) kick in.

Cities (towns, counties, whatever) need commercial and industrial bases to share the tax burden. It's been that way since the original sim-city. An affluent suburb without any tax subsidizes are going to pay incredible school taxes.

NYC teachers contribute 0% towards their personal health coverage (on one of their plans) and despite lower compensation offset by a far lower teacher-to-student-ratio (excessive special ed) they still don't face a similar budget crisis.
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Old 05-06-2013, 07:56 AM
 
2,245 posts, read 4,297,657 times
Reputation: 1105
Quote:
Originally Posted by WithDisp View Post
This topic comes up again and again.

No money saved by merging systems would truly offset any tax bases.
Also once your tax dollar crosses another district line, federal rights for the student to go to the school of their choosing (if they are in a failing or minority majority school) kick in.

Cities (towns, counties, whatever) need commercial and industrial bases to share the tax burden. It's been that way since the original sim-city. An affluent suburb without any tax subsidizes are going to pay incredible school taxes.

NYC teachers contribute 0% towards their personal health coverage (on one of their plans) and despite lower compensation offset by a far lower teacher-to-student-ratio (excessive special ed) they still don't face a similar budget crisis.
This is because the state is stealing tax money from the NYC suburbs and giving it to NYC.
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Old 05-06-2013, 07:58 AM
 
2,245 posts, read 4,297,657 times
Reputation: 1105
Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
I just recently went over my school district's budget and found that the cost for health insurance rises by $2 million dollars each year. The teachers contribute 15% toward their health insurance ($300,000) leaving the district's taxpayers to cover the remaining $1.7 million. The figures I saw were for 3 consecutive budgets which = $5,100,000 burden on the taxpayers just for health insurance (not including dental.)

If the amount teachers were to contribute was increased by $200/month ($2,400/year) based upon the number of teachers in the district, we would save the $2 million and be able to apply it to maintaining courses as opposed to cutting them. It would preserve teaching jobs. Why does it feel (to me) like teachers would rather throw their peers under the bus as opposed to making a larger contribution and saving their peers jobs?

Going over the budget, teacher salaries and benefits made up over 55% of the budget. Given contractual obligations -- raises, step increases, increases to health care, etc., salaries and benefits will consumer larger portions of the budget in years to come. Add to it unfunded mandates and the exorbitant expense to convert to the Common Core, LI taxpayers will be in for a world of hurt -- nothing that mergers could substantially offset.
15-17% is what most district employees pay to their health care which is slightly below the 20% average that exists in the private sector. You really cant ask or expect them to pay more than what exists in the private sector.

I doubt your districts insurance is climbing $2 million EACH year. Double check your numbers. If it is, they need to get a new plan.
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:10 AM
 
1,098 posts, read 2,257,038 times
Reputation: 1014
Let's also tell it like it is. School districts will never consolidate because of segregation and perceived dilution of quality. By all counts, Jericho should merge with Hicksville and Locust Valley-Glen Cove-North Shore-Oyster Bay should be a single district as well. Westbury and Wheatley should merge. Can you imagine anyone going to the Half Hollow Hills residents and suggesting they merge with Wyandanch?

And on and on. It will never happen in our lifetime, but this is the kind of consolidation we need. Either that, or countywide districts where, as in NY City, some schools are regarded more highly than others.
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:13 AM
 
1,740 posts, read 2,962,933 times
Reputation: 1170
Quote:
Originally Posted by longislander2 View Post
Let's also tell it like it is. School districts will never consolidate because of segregation and perceived dilution of quality. By all counts, Jericho should merge with Hicksville and Locust Valley-Glen Cove-North Shore-Oyster Bay should be a single district as well. Westbury and Wheatley should merge. Can you imagine anyone going to the Half Hollow Hills residents and suggesting they merge with Wyandanch?

And on and on. It will never happen in our lifetime, but this is the kind of consolidation we need. Either that, or countywide districts where, as in NY City, some schools are regarded more highly than others.
__________________________________________________ __________________________________
"Can you imagine anyone going to the Half Hollow Hills residents and suggesting they merge with Wyandanch?"

EXACTLY my point above.
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:15 AM
 
4,206 posts, read 7,042,634 times
Reputation: 2308
breaking news!
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Old 05-06-2013, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,833 posts, read 29,141,302 times
Reputation: 7397
Quote:
Originally Posted by WithDisp View Post
This topic comes up again and again.

No money saved by merging systems would truly offset any tax bases.
Also once your tax dollar crosses another district line, federal rights for the student to go to the school of their choosing (if they are in a failing or minority majority school) kick in.

Cities (towns, counties, whatever) need commercial and industrial bases to share the tax burden. It's been that way since the original sim-city. An affluent suburb without any tax subsidizes are going to pay incredible school taxes.

NYC teachers contribute 0% towards their personal health coverage (on one of their plans) and despite lower compensation offset by a far lower teacher-to-student-ratio (excessive special ed) they still don't face a similar budget crisis.
NYC schools are part of the city budget...they need more, they get more from Albany. Imagine if they had to mind the budget as closely year to year like their non city counterparts?
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