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Old 02-23-2008, 07:33 AM
 
131 posts, read 367,657 times
Reputation: 55

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The same thing happened to me after I recently closed. Mine actually collapsed. Call your insurance company. I ended up having 2 new cesspools installed in my back yard. Cost me 2000 or so. I had 4 rings and 2 caps and the price was half of what I was quoted from other companies.

Also call your insurance company, the ended up covering half the cost of mine. I had allstate. I would leave the driveway alone and install new ones somewhere else, maybe the front lawn area. Its much cheaper to plant new seeds than redo a driveway that is perfect.

It should not collapse once you have water stop going to it. Good luck. I would not be too worried about it since you're going to be living there for a while and having 2 new cesspools is a piece of mind. You could also try contacting the previous owners directly and see if they would give some money to help. Sometimes asking nicely might work.

Anthony
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Old 02-23-2008, 01:00 PM
 
245 posts, read 32,602 times
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Default As Is?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Panther5766 View Post
Our drama continues. We moved the remained of our possessions into the house Last Monday. Yesterday, I noticed that the house's second cess pool vent had toilet paper and feces all around it. I called the cess pool company out, and this cess pool was full of roots and the pipes completely filled with roots. Though this cess pool was newer from 1996, it was a cinder block cess pool built under a driveway and was a collapsation hazard. We now have to dig up our driveway, and have a new cesspool and new pipes put in for the second cess pool.

The company is very stand up. I've seen the pipe, tree-roots, and cess pools inidated with tree roots myself. It is not the cess pool company this is a problem. This cess pool also had a new cap on it.

We are having to pay 6,500 plus resurfacing the driveway, all new landscaping for the entire front yard, and tree removal. We did hire a home inspector and he did not run the water for a long period of time. He includes amongst his accolades, the fact that he teachers home inspection, so I thought I was getting someone good. I'm livid.

I kept asking my lawyer about escrowing for the cess pool and a cess pool inspection, but everyone kept telling me that it's never done on the island, that no one would be willing to have their yard dug up to check the cess pool, and given the age of the home and original cess pool, digging it up would require a whole new pool put into place.

What's the point of hiring a home inspector if they are not liable for the quality of their inspection? Shouldn't there be lemon laws for houses. Selling a house without working plumbing and no forewarning to the purchaser should be against the law. I thought everything should have to be in working order.
When we bought, the seller listed just the cess-pool "As Is." Perhaps this happened with you?

We were also told by the inspector that he wasn't responsible for testing or looking at the cess-pool, that you needed a specialist for that.

In our case, I just assumed that the people living there had a somewhat-functional water system. After all, they were living there. RIght? WRONG! These people showered by bucket, didn't have washer, and rarely flushed their toilets. As such, the day we moved in, feces flowed back into the house through the basement wall. Our welcome to NY!
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Old 02-25-2008, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Kings Park & Jamesport
2,438 posts, read 5,668,136 times
Reputation: 437
Did the cesspool company place the new cesspool under the driveway again? Id so why?

Sorry to hear all this, IMO the owners knew of the issue and covered it up. It does not mean they broke the law.

I will say that the other option was to put a pipe camera down the cespool to check it prior to purchase......but at a cost of $600, rarely does a buyer opt for it.

Its also hard to believe that a block cesspool was installed in 1996.....costs too much in labor......unless the owner installed this himself. From what you said, it might true!

I would also be very concerned anout what else the inspector missed.
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Old 02-25-2008, 10:45 AM
 
Location: Dead end - Long Island,
999 posts, read 1,253,751 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbinspections View Post
I would also be very concerned anout what else the inspector missed.
That's exactly what i was thinking earlier....
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Old 03-08-2008, 05:20 AM
 
13 posts, read 43,192 times
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Tom Moser
“Did the seller provide the written NYS Property Condition Disclosure Form prior to closing or did they give you the mandated $500 credit at closing? “


We were given the $500 by the owners of the house.




Lima
“Another good thing while you are doing it is, remove the trees... “


The Trees and bushes have all been removed. Our new house looks like a war zone. It used to be nicely landscaped, but there should be any roots interfering with the cess pools now.


AnthonyNYC, how did you get the insurance company to cover the cesspool. I was told that cesspools were never covered on home owners insurance policies. Please tell me how you did this?


The cesspool company said that it looked like the cess pool was a cave in hazard, so the driveway had to be dug up. Besides you don't want to leave old cess pools hanging around, because they become cave in hazards. We found out after the cess pool was dug up that the cess pool was not load bearing at all and if there was a code for cess pools, which there isn't, it would be in sincere violation. I'm surprised the moving truck did not cause the cess pool to collapse. As for moving the cess pool, there wasn't a good place to move it to. The front yard has the other two new cess pools and we don't want to have to dig up the walk to get the pipe in there. We did make sure to put in a man hole cover in the drive way so that it wouldn't have to be dug up again, and there is full access to the entire thing.


NYNewbie, oh no, I would never buy a house with something listed “As Is” unless I had escrowed the money to have it replaced immediately! I'm sorry your welcome to NY was so sour. I hope things are going more smoothly


Kbinspections, the cess pool company believes that the cinder block cess pool was self installed He said that no company would do that kind of work, let alone under a driveway. We already thought about what the inspector may have missed. I guess that will be our worry for the next few years.


Does anyone know if this counts as a capital improvement under Brookhaven's Tax exemptions for capital improvements made to the home within the first 90 days of ownership? We did not only replace inoperable cesspools, but we also upgraded from cinder blocks to the rings and dome construction. We also made sure the cess pool under the driveway was load bearing.




Thank You for all of your suggestions.
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Old 03-08-2008, 07:35 AM
 
Location: Kings Park & Jamesport
2,438 posts, read 5,668,136 times
Reputation: 437
It is not a capital improvement.............crazy story...........makes my industry look bad.

Did he mention anthing about aluminum wiring? You may want to get the household electrical system inspected by an inspector or electrician.

Best of luck!
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Old 03-08-2008, 09:56 AM
 
Location: Dead end - Long Island,
999 posts, read 1,253,751 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Panther5766 View Post
Lima
“Another good thing while you are doing it is, remove the trees... “


The Trees and bushes have all been removed. Our new house looks like a war zone. It used to be nicely landscaped, but there should be any roots interfering with the cess pools now.

Not just for the sake of the cesspool, for the house also..any tree that if it falls can hit the house......remove it now, there not worth the chance for that 5 minutes of fame on the news channels after a good rain and some fairly high winds and a wrecked house and a fight with the ins comp...

I know what you are going thru and it sucks
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Old 03-09-2008, 11:43 AM
 
1,857 posts, read 2,645,973 times
Reputation: 2604
Default Urban legend?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbinspections View Post
It is not a capital improvement.............crazy story...........makes my industry look bad.

Did he mention anthing about aluminum wiring? You may want to get the household electrical system inspected by an inspector or electrician.

Best of luck!
Having dealt with this issue on my recent Long Island sale I'm curious what you think the issue is with aluminum wiring? I spent a significant amount of time researching this issue when confronted with it.

Generally speaking what most people think the issue and the remedy is winds up being misleading.
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Old 03-09-2008, 09:54 PM
 
Location: Kings Park & Jamesport
2,438 posts, read 5,668,136 times
Reputation: 437
The issue with aluminum wiring is well documented but it boils down to 2. The wiring builds a coating of alum. oxide on exposed wiring and "cold creep" which is a process which causes loose connections. Poor installation furthered the problems.
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Old 03-10-2008, 06:32 AM
 
1,857 posts, read 2,645,973 times
Reputation: 2604
Default Interesting.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kbinspections View Post
The issue with aluminum wiring is well documented but it boils down to 2. The wiring builds a coating of alum. oxide on exposed wiring and "cold creep" which is a process which causes loose connections. Poor installation furthered the problems.
I consulted with an electrical engineer who designs wiring for large-scale commercial projects and here's what he shared:

Aluminum wiring doesn't wear well over time becoming brittle and fractures easily after repeated twisting and bending. Thus it results in a poor connection which has been known to lead to over heating. However the common remedy of pig-tailing copper wire to the aluminum is essentially flawed because they are dissimilar metals and don't reduce the primary issue. His advice at the time I needed it was that the relative health of the wiring was more important than its composition. And ironically aluminum wiring is now commonly used instead of copper due to improvements in the product and the overall cost factor.

A second recommendation corroborated this assessment as well.
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