U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > Long Island
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-09-2016, 05:30 AM
 
6,993 posts, read 9,540,264 times
Reputation: 2957

Advertisements

Seems to be common in the nyc suburbs for parents to send kids to advanced sports programs at a young age:

The Olympics are the original freak show - NY Daily News

Have parents really gone overboard or is he just eanting aimlessly?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-09-2016, 05:45 AM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now Rehoboth Beach, DE
7,870 posts, read 10,559,925 times
Reputation: 7952
You have commented on something that is the extreme, but, to a lesser degree something that is evident on Long Island. Again, JMO, but, just look at all the programs for gymnastics, soccer, lacrosse, football, tennis, etc. The kids are pushed to excel today far more so than years ago. It is a multifaceted problem as some of it starts off innocently enough. You have, often by necessity, a need to keep the kids occupied after school as both parents are working. They are enrolled in an activity that they seem to enjoy and before you know it, they are spending every moment at that activity.

To be honest, if you look at all the kids in programs like this and the ones that actually excel, the numbers of $$$ spent is astronomical. The one that come to mind immediately were the McEnroe's kids and Sarah Hughes. Obviously it worked out for them, but there are so many that will never achieve that level of talent.

A long time ago we forgot about kids being kids. Again, JMO.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 06:18 AM
 
4,206 posts, read 7,035,409 times
Reputation: 2308
Parents have been sending their kids to "advanced sports programs" in New York City, in NYC suburbs, and around the country for a LONG time now.

I would agree that it's become more prevalent in recent years, but this sort of thing isn't just limited to sports. Kids in general are simply exposed to more and given more opportunities than in years past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 07:10 AM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
16,792 posts, read 25,870,668 times
Reputation: 12727
It's pretty sad actually. Used to be if you were athletic and or even just pretty good at a sport you could make your school sports team. Now you are pretty much expected to commit to a sport and do that all the time. My son made his HS baseball team last year and was the only kid who hadn't played year round baseball. Other parents didn't really seem to know what to make if this.
There has been a lot of talk in the medical community about overuse injuries with these kids who go at it all year playing one sport and nothing else and doing specific drills on the side on top of that. It's not good. We've tried to keep our kids in a variety of sports but we are swimming against the tide.
Funny my husband commented last nights out how you never hear of swimmers having these catastrophic injuries and IMHO they seem happier than the other athletes. They just swim which is so good for you and really no stress on the body.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 07:22 AM
 
1,127 posts, read 858,395 times
Reputation: 1476
While I know some parents who overestimate their kids' ability, I think it is the rare situation where a kid gets pushed to the extremes mentioned in the article. There are parents who dream of their kid playing professional sports or being in the Olympics. The majority realize it to be a fantasy.

One big thing, however, is college scholarship money. I know many people who received substantial college money and others who received free rides based on sports. The kids were good but had no illusions of going pro.

I was involved in youth sports for several years and all of the "better" players who were being "pushed" and placed in special programs were doing so with hopes of getting college money. It doesn't take an insane level of ability to get _something_, especially if you pick the right sport.

It is unfortunate that a sports scholarship is usually easier to obtain, and often more lucrative, than an academic scholarship.

On the other side, when a kid shows a rare talent (and interest) in a sport, the only way to bring them to a top level is one of these special programs. You just don't get to the top without help - or without much hard work and sacrifice. I agree with the article that it seems like a prison sentence and that what should be a part time endeavor has become a life choice. On the other hand, I doubt that a gold medal winner, world champion or major league player would agree with that.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 07:27 AM
 
4,206 posts, read 7,035,409 times
Reputation: 2308
growing up in the 80s, several sports were already gravitating towards this model. Every serious soccer player was playing year round and for multiple teams, the best basketball players played AAU in addition to their high school teams, you weren't going to be good at tennis unless you were receiving private lessons and practicing every day, and the better baseball players were playing on summer travel teams.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 07:30 AM
 
4,206 posts, read 7,035,409 times
Reputation: 2308
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe461 View Post
One big thing, however, is college scholarship money. I know many people who received substantial college money and others who received free rides based on sports. The kids were good but had no illusions of going pro.
given the costs of a private university tuition and the potential post-college opportunities that can result, getting a full ride is a virtual lottery ticket.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 07:40 AM
 
6,993 posts, read 9,540,264 times
Reputation: 2957
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe461 View Post
I was involved in youth sports for several years and all of the "better" players who were being "pushed" and placed in special programs were doing so with hopes of getting college money. It doesn't take an insane level of ability to get _something_, especially if you pick the right sport.

Quote:
Originally Posted by S.I.B. View Post
given the costs of a private university tuition and the potential post-college opportunities that can result, getting a full ride is a virtual lottery ticket.
Trouble is that the bar keeps getting raised over time. By now, it does take "Olympic" abilities to get substantial college scholarship money. This is true especially in sports like swimming, track, fencing etc. if you benchmark today's college athletes with Olympians 10 to 20 years ago.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 10:22 AM
 
Location: Long Island
8,743 posts, read 12,190,584 times
Reputation: 5048
Agree with everything here. And it's definitely not just NYC/LI. Many of the states in the northeast are very serious about their kids' sports. Look at football in TX too (Friday Night Tykes on Netflix is pretty eye-opening). We have our kids in travel already too, but there are different levels even there. We did house league and it was such a mess... much older kids playing with younger (not enough to do divisions), kids who can barely play, etc. Very frustrating. It's very much up to the families in terms of how far to go with it. I just want my kids doing something instead of playing video games all the time, which they have no problem doing. It's hard not to compare your kids with the elite kids who either have a natural ability or train ALL THE TIME. Coaching experience tells me that no kid is supposed to specialize in any single sport due to muscle maturation - it's better for them to do a wide variety of activities as they grow. Anyway, just have to remind yourself that kids live in the "now" and just want to have fun.

I will say this - many will cite studies have shown that kids don't care about winning - that they don't remember winning/losing when they're older, but winning (along with actual playing time) is what actually gives them that extra high in the "now".

Last edited by ovi8; 08-09-2016 at 10:50 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-09-2016, 10:32 AM
 
Location: Where my bills arrive
8,123 posts, read 9,566,811 times
Reputation: 8148
Sports can go overboard but is it better to have a pale, out of shape vegetable on the couch that needs an app to go outside in the sun and walk around?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:




Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > New York > Long Island
View detailed profiles of:
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top