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Old 02-28-2008, 11:09 AM
 
770 posts, read 1,715,884 times
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Default What is the difference between a splanch & a hi-ranch?

Or do realtors on Long Island use the terms interchangeably? From the outside, they look really similar to me.
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Old 02-28-2008, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Little Babylon
3,558 posts, read 4,314,634 times
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Splanch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Breaking the Mold -- Newsday.com

Quote:
Raised Ranch

The raised ranch has one full flight of stairs, and two levels. The entry at lower floor. A full flight of stairs, usually near the front door, leads up to the living level. Top floor tends to be full height ceilings with the Living Room, Dining Room, Kitchen and Bedrooms. Lower floor often has lower ceilings. Although door is at or nearly at grade, sometimes the back and/or a side of the house is partially below ground. Many have the appearance of a ranch house that has been stretched upward and had the door lowered.
Split-level home - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 02-28-2008, 11:40 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClarkStreetKid View Post
Splanch - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Breaking the Mold -- Newsday.com (http://www.newsday.com/community/guide/lihistory/ny-historyhome-splanch,0,6342679.story?coll=ny-lihistory-navigation - broken link)


Split-level home - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Is a raised ranch & a hi ranch the same thing? From the outside, do all of these houses look pretty much the same? Thanks so much.
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Old 02-28-2008, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Little Babylon
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A high ranch and raised ranch I believe to be regional names for the same thing, essentially a regular ranch up top and a raised basement below.

A splanch is a creature all it's own. Rumor has it that they created a new level of hell just for the designer of the splanch.
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Old 02-28-2008, 12:21 PM
 
Location: Bridgeville,Pa
4,177 posts, read 6,957,303 times
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I cannot stand high ranches. you couldnt pay me enough to live in one. The reason ; try lugging bags of groceries up the first 6-7 steps, opening the door, then lug them back up another 6-7 steps into the kitchen.

Then try to balance a baby on top of all that.

i am sure they have their uses, but I just dont dig them.

d
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Old 02-28-2008, 12:51 PM
 
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The Splanch usually has:

FIRST FLOOR: an entry, garage and kitchen on the first floor then UP a few stairs.
SECOND FLOOR: living room, sometimes with vaulted ceiling
THIRD FLOOR: Bedrooms and bath(s)
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Old 02-28-2008, 02:42 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by watamensch View Post
The Splanch usually has:

FIRST FLOOR: an entry, garage and kitchen on the first floor then UP a few stairs.
SECOND FLOOR: living room, sometimes with vaulted ceiling
THIRD FLOOR: Bedrooms and bath(s)
That is a very good description. Colonials are defined as having all the bedrooms on the top floor. That is why sometimes real estate agents will call a splanch a colonial.
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Old 02-28-2008, 03:18 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomMoser View Post
That is a very good description. Colonials are defined as having all the bedrooms on the top floor. That is why sometimes real estate agents will call a splanch a colonial.
Why thank you Mr. Moser

Here's a list:

SPLIT:
LOWEST: Basement - Under part of the house
LOWER: Family Room, Garage, 1/2 bath
ENTRY LEVEL: Living, Dining and Kitchen
UPPER LEVEL: Bedrooms and baths

SPLANCH:
BASEMENT: Under part of the house
FIRST FLOOR: an entry, garage and kitchen on the first floor then UP a few stairs.
SECOND FLOOR: living room, sometimes with vaulted ceiling
THIRD FLOOR: Bedrooms and bath(s)

HIGH RANCH:
LOWER LEVEL: Garage, Family Room, 1/2 bath - possible office/guest room
Up a few stairs to the...
ENTRY LEVEL: Entry foyer and closet
Up a few stairs to the...
MAIN LEVEL: Kitchen, living room, dining room, bedrooms and baths

COLONIAL:
LOWEST LEVEL: Basement - usually under the whole house
MAIN LEVEL: Living room, dining room, family room and kitchen
UPPER LEVEL: Bedrooms and baths

RANCH:
LOWEST LEVEL: Basement - usually under the whole house
MAIN LEVEL: Living room, dining room, family room, kitchen, bedrooms and baths

CAPE:
LOWEST LEVEL: Basement (possible)
MAIN LEVEL: Living room, dining room, family room and kitchen, possibly one or more bedrooms.
UPPER LEVEL: Usually two bedrooms and a bath, unless extended


These are general descriptions, and exceptions exist for each one. Hope it helps!
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Old 02-28-2008, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Kings Park & Jamesport
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Very good everyone................wealth of knowledge runs deep!
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Old 02-28-2008, 03:45 PM
 
770 posts, read 1,715,884 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by watamensch View Post
Why thank you Mr. Moser

Here's a list:

SPLIT:
LOWEST: Basement - Under part of the house
LOWER: Family Room, Garage, 1/2 bath
ENTRY LEVEL: Living, Dining and Kitchen
UPPER LEVEL: Bedrooms and baths

SPLANCH:
BASEMENT: Under part of the house
FIRST FLOOR: an entry, garage and kitchen on the first floor then UP a few stairs.
SECOND FLOOR: living room, sometimes with vaulted ceiling
THIRD FLOOR: Bedrooms and bath(s)

HIGH RANCH:
LOWER LEVEL: Garage, Family Room, 1/2 bath - possible office/guest room
Up a few stairs to the...
ENTRY LEVEL: Entry foyer and closet
Up a few stairs to the...
MAIN LEVEL: Kitchen, living room, dining room, bedrooms and baths

COLONIAL:
LOWEST LEVEL: Basement - usually under the whole house
MAIN LEVEL: Living room, dining room, family room and kitchen
UPPER LEVEL: Bedrooms and baths

RANCH:
LOWEST LEVEL: Basement - usually under the whole house
MAIN LEVEL: Living room, dining room, family room, kitchen, bedrooms and baths

CAPE:
LOWEST LEVEL: Basement (possible)
MAIN LEVEL: Living room, dining room, family room and kitchen, possibly one or more bedrooms.
UPPER LEVEL: Usually two bedrooms and a bath, unless extended


These are general descriptions, and exceptions exist for each one. Hope it helps!
WOW...sooooo helpful! Thanks! You wouldn't by chance have descriptions of how the exteriors on the above differ, do you? Or do they all basically look similar and the main thing that distinguishes one from the other the interior layout? I mean, I see very similar looking houses listed as splanches, hi-ranches or colonials!!
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