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Old 05-22-2018, 01:44 PM
 
182 posts, read 211,393 times
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Originally Posted by sweetpotato View Post
Apple juice - Progressive School sounds too good to be true. How can it really be that good? Are the academics truly strong? It sounds like exactly what I'm looking for.
My sons been there since Sept, he’s in Kindergarten. He loves it. They also individualize the curriculum for the students. They break the class up into study groups of below grade, on grade and above grade so they can learn at the appropriate pace for each student. I can’t speak to the higher grades but so far we are very happy with his academic progress.

You can meet with the director and take a tour. I have nothing but good things to say about it. They take a holistic approach to education (all subjects are connected) as opposed to most public schools (and parochial schools). More of a Waldorf style of education without the very, very high price tag. I’d also read the literature on the website for a better understanding of their educational philosophy.

I have a customer who runs one of more prestigious private schools on Long Island (think $$,$$$/yr). He kinda scoffed at Progressive school when I asked him about it saying they can’t offer what we offer. But he did have to concede that it’s far better than public school.

Last edited by Apple juice; 05-22-2018 at 01:52 PM..
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Old 05-22-2018, 02:00 PM
 
6,121 posts, read 3,316,354 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sweetpotato View Post
Kokonutty, my post was to ask questions for different school recommendations, not parenting advice. Most of us would not expose a young child to a rated R movie. We all expose our children to different things in different areas on our own time as we each personally see best. This is different parent to parent and child to child. I do not think growing up in an upper middle class town is "reality", but I respect it if you do. As for my oldest, I am researching special needs services for him on special needs boards. My younger two have to accommodate a lot and I'd hate to pull them out of their community where everyone knows them. Siblings of special needs children need support, I'd like to find a setting where they will most likely have it and can make friends easily.

My husband's job will be in Hempstead. I would prefer a small to medium school district if they went to public. Class sizes in my tiny town's one school (K-8) do not exceed 20 kids, with about 3 classes per grade. Unfortunately, this is what my kids are used to, so I'm hesitant to jump them to a large school. Perhaps if I visit I'll feel differently.

Progressive School of Long Island sounds perfect, I will definitely schedule a visit there! Since we'll be renting at first, it will be easier not to worry about elementary school zones when we buy. If we go private, it would not be past 8th grade for my younger two.
I was certainly not giving parenting advice, or movie reviews, just trying to help you out with how things are on Long Island as you seem to have made some assumptions that are not accurate. Certainly private schools exist but are very expensive and the return on investment is questionable when compared to Long Island's public schools and the philosophy of having kids go to school with other kids in the neighborhood as opposed to separating them. The average kid in a private school here will definitely be from a family above the upper middle class threshold.

With the added information you've provided I'd suggest looking into Merrick, Bellmore, Wantagh and Seaford which, to many, come across as more "down to earth" than some North Shore districts. Of the four, Wantagh would be my first choice. Not knowing what services your older child requires, I'd note that this area would put you very close to the Viscardi School which may (or may not) fit your needs.
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Old 05-22-2018, 09:04 PM
 
191 posts, read 473,207 times
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No assumptions. Agree in theory that the average child at a private school is from a family above means, but so is the average child in Jericho or Cold Spring Harbor schools. There are many intangible and varied reasons parents gladly choose private, in which case they've likely gotten the return on the investment they were looking for. As a racial minority, there's a good chance my kids would be treated as outsiders at some privates, too.

We'll probably end up in public anyway. But I would like to see if I can avoid my 10yo having to change to a separate middle school, especially after just moving to a new elementary. My town has just one school K-8 and I think it's a great structure for kids to go through for schooling.
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Old 05-22-2018, 09:05 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now a Rehoboth Beach Bunny
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Note: The Viscardi school is in Albertson and only handles physically disabled students.
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Old 05-22-2018, 10:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
Note: The Viscardi school is in Albertson and only handles physically disabled students.
Which is 15-20 minutes from the area I've mentioned and we don't know what special needs the child has.
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Old 05-23-2018, 02:18 AM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
17,568 posts, read 21,748,544 times
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Originally Posted by sweetpotato View Post
We are considering a move to LI. I know public schools are excellent but they are so big and we are from a very small town. If we move we want to set our kids up so it's as fun and not scary as possible. Is there a private school with very strong academics and fun, hands on learning environment? Our current district is excellent, but they are also used to tons of worksheets. Would love to find a place more fun and playful but without losing academic rigor.
Not ALL Long Island districts are huge. There are some smaller districts, especially on the North Shore.
I am a graduate of the Oyster Bay-East Norwich district. More recently, my niece and three nephews graduated from Oyster Bay HS. All have gone on to excellent and well regarded colleges.

Locust Valley is another small school district, that performs very well.

Cold Spring Harbor has almost a "private school feel". That is located in Western Suffolk County.

A bit further out, is Port Jefferson school district. These are three of my favorites.

If you insist upon private schools, Friends Academy in Brookville is one of my favorites. I have friends who went their and loved it.

Two of my siblings attended the East Woods School. One attended all eight years. The other decided to return to public school after a few years. It's well regarded.
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Old 05-23-2018, 03:08 AM
 
191 posts, read 473,207 times
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I like the sound of these districts and will schedule some visits, thanks! I'll need to get busy if I'm going to try to see these before the school year is over.
The main reason I want private school is for the stability of one K-8. My younger two also love seeing each other in school and my youngest always runs out to hug her older brother when their lines pass each other. They would have five years together in their current school. They also write notes to each other through the school's student "postal" system. They have a sweet set of friends, but my middle one is shy, so I don't know how quickly he'd make friends in a new place. I would love for them to have each other, they always say seeing each other is the highlight of their day. I don't want to take that away from them if we move. Progressive sounds amazing, but we'd lose out on school activities like sports and orchestra. I'm having a hard time leaving what we have but I can't make my husband have such a horrible commute.
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Old 05-23-2018, 05:17 AM
 
Location: under the beautiful Carolina blue
15,723 posts, read 23,957,202 times
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Someone here made a good point earlier....although districts and even schools might be big, a child in elementary school will feel that the world of their class is very small. When my kids were in elementary, their friends changed from year to year based on who was in their class, and I remember the same from my childhood. They tend to stick with whoever is in their class. Kids don't really see things the way they see them. My daughter overheard me telling someone the other day that her elementary school has over 1000 students and she didn't believe me. My ILs lament us moving to NC and having the kids go to such a big school...meanwhile their elementary school in our LI town had about 700 kids, and two less grade levels. It sounds big, but doesn't always "feel" big.
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Old 05-23-2018, 04:42 PM
 
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I've known Eric of the Progressive School for a long time. It's definitely a niche school. OK facilities, but not nearly what you would find most public schools. Read about humanism, that's what the school's philosophy is based on. The oldest kids (usually a handful) are really on a individual study plan. I assume that the kids are still getting Spanish, but there's no library, orchestra, band, etc. At one time, they had an art teacher coming in part time, but there's no special art facilities or supplies. I don't know if it's still this way, but some of the students were "classified" as special ed, but their parents didn't want them in a special ed program or inclusion type of class. They can and do get special services provided by the public school district for speech and OT, if they have an IEP. It is a very "mellow" type of school with low-key discipline and a warm atmosphere. It is not like a Waldorf school at all. There is no academic pushing and it is very individualized.
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Old 05-24-2018, 05:48 AM
 
182 posts, read 211,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
I've known Eric of the Progressive School for a long time. It's definitely a niche school. OK facilities, but not nearly what you would find most public schools. Read about humanism, that's what the school's philosophy is based on. The oldest kids (usually a handful) are really on a individual study plan. I assume that the kids are still getting Spanish, but there's no library, orchestra, band, etc. At one time, they had an art teacher coming in part time, but there's no special art facilities or supplies. I don't know if it's still this way, but some of the students were "classified" as special ed, but their parents didn't want them in a special ed program or inclusion type of class. They can and do get special services provided by the public school district for speech and OT, if they have an IEP. It is a very "mellow" type of school with low-key discipline and a warm atmosphere. It is not like a Waldorf school at all. There is no academic pushing and it is very individualized.
They get Spanish starting in Kindergarten, and they have art classes as well. The background philosophy is Neo-humanism which is a little different than humanism. Aside from the holistic approach to education the philosophy is not something which is taught to the students.
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