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Old 01-26-2019, 07:18 AM
 
7,547 posts, read 4,100,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peconic117 View Post
Yep as soon as I saw “Latinx” any tiny shred of credibility went out the window.
I had to look it up. Sigh.
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Old 01-26-2019, 07:27 AM
 
1,613 posts, read 2,085,216 times
Reputation: 1159
Quote:
Originally Posted by MemoryMaker View Post
To be completely honest, and I know this is a can of worms, but I believe that there are *certain* privileges that exist based on race just like how there are *certain* privileges that exist based off of age, disability status, nationality, class at birth and gender. There's no harm in admitting this, it doesn't make us bad people to acknowledge it and its why we have these laws and protections around that attempt to alleviate it around.

And this usually leads to the question, "Does that mean that a poor white person will have it easier than rich black person?"

The answer would be probably not since the rich black person also has major privileges based on class. Its also important not to compare apples & oranges since that same rich black person would likely still have unique challenges of varying degrees in comparison to the equivalent rich white person such as public perception, the higher-risk of losing their class status and probably even less generational wealth.
No doubt one could describe those born right-handed as Right Privileged, those born taller Height privileged, those with perfect eyesight Sight privileged. Does that mean those with those privileges will have it easier? Depends on a billion different circumstances (some of their own making and some not). Enough variations in circumstances to make the 'privilege' theory - like so much academic theory - silly and useless (and that is just selecting a few rhyming 'privileges' from the million possible and intersecting human 'privileges').

(As far as the question of whether an upper middle class black person has more or less privilege than a lower class Asian (assuming all other possible privileges are absolutely and impossibly equal), I leave that to the academy to needlessly squabble about.)

Last edited by Quick Commenter; 01-26-2019 at 07:46 AM..
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Old 01-26-2019, 08:07 AM
 
170 posts, read 325,769 times
Reputation: 175
The article by Vivett Dukes is fake news.

First, South Floral Park students attend Floral Park Memorial High School. Second, this school is not “lily white.” Floral Park Memorial is 45% minority, with a roughly even mix of Black, Hispanic, and Asian students.

I will contact Vivett, tell her the facts, and demand she retract the article.

The Sad State of Affairs in Long Island
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Old 01-26-2019, 09:13 AM
 
3,613 posts, read 3,950,541 times
Reputation: 3423
Quote:
Originally Posted by NSHL10 View Post
Isn't it racist to believe that blacks and other minority students can only excel when they are mixed in with whites?
The biggest indicator of academic success in general is socioeconomic status. People who buy in better areas are usually more intelligent, have better jobs to pay for the more expensive houses, and pass their intelligence on via genetics.
Some of our poorest districts spend the most money per pupil, with limited results. Add an influx of undocumented non English speakers, and you get worse results.
When you take the residents social factors away, and look at qualifications of educators, educator pay, years of experience, social status/demographics of school staff etc. You'll find that most of these are nearly parallel in all districts aside from perhaps the top 10% on the Island.

This however is completely untrue when you compare major urban districts with their suburban counterparts, or areas of the US which have school districts with widely different payscales based on residential income, etc.

To lift the economically disadvantage up, requires more.
To guarantee success of the upper class, requires less.
It seems like there's an easy recipe for socialism there- but our schools are funded by a lions share by property taxes, and thus the system isn't set up that way.

One may also wish to question, albeit somewhat with regards to ethics- but what is the best overall use for society for these resources? Is closing the "achievement gap" through means of redistribution lowering the overall output of educational institutions?
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Old 01-26-2019, 10:11 AM
 
5,725 posts, read 7,080,731 times
Reputation: 4588
Quote:
Originally Posted by WithDisp View Post
When you take the residents social factors away, and look at qualifications of educators, educator pay, years of experience, social status/demographics of school staff etc. You'll find that most of these are nearly parallel in all districts aside from perhaps the top 10% on the Island.

This however is completely untrue when you compare major urban districts with their suburban counterparts, or areas of the US which have school districts with widely different payscales based on residential income, etc.

To lift the economically disadvantage up, requires more.
To guarantee success of the upper class, requires less.
It seems like there's an easy recipe for socialism there- but our schools are funded by a lions share by property taxes, and thus the system isn't set up that way.

One may also wish to question, albeit somewhat with regards to ethics- but what is the best overall use for society for these resources? Is closing the "achievement gap" through means of redistribution lowering the overall output of educational institutions?
Problem I find with the property tax situation on LI and lack of LI income tax is the loss of a thought of a society. Its is owners versus renters. In areas where there is a lot of illegal apartments with transient tenants, the non illegal property owners don't want to pay for the others' tenants. You lose the idea of a community and subsequently lose support to spend extra to help someone else who is basically freeloading.
If every one paid into supporting the system, perhaps there would be more cohesiveness.
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Old 01-26-2019, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Between the Bays
10,780 posts, read 8,903,185 times
Reputation: 5203
Out here in the Mastics it is very diverse, and unsegregated. More so than anywhere I've ever seen in NY. It is a model neighborhood for racial equality. It is a liberal politicians worst nightmare. It is what Democrats thrive for all of our neighborhoods (aside from theirs) to become.
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Old 01-27-2019, 10:15 PM
 
43 posts, read 37,760 times
Reputation: 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndreaII View Post
Vivette Dukes forgot about Huntington SD #3. Our school system is literally 50% indigent Hispanics - on the welfare dole, their kids can't speak a word of English until they take it as a second language, which means the English speaking children don't learn much if anything at all the first few years of school because of the language barrier in the classroom. All of the teachers hired by this particular school district has a policy of only hiring English/Spanish bilingual teachers for obvious reasons.

Our public school taxes are sky high, and this is where our money is going? To educate illegal aliens and sponging career welfare recipients? This has been going on for a few decades in Huntington. May as well ship our money off to a third world country because that's what it feels like. Not to mention the reputation of SD #3 is lousy for obvious reasons.

We're surrounded by the Cold Spring Harbor SD that's about a mile away to the west, Harborfields in Greenlawn that's about 2 miles east, SD#6 is about 2 miles away to the south. All much, much better than SD #3.

I wonder what Vivette would say about this. I can only imagine.
If you want to talk about welfare. We should discuss and also, at least, get pics of the quality individuals, that our SPECIFIC federal tax dollars support in places like West Virginia, Alabama, and Mississippi. In terms of costs...salaries, pensions and benefits have just gotten out of control..they are high in many districts... black, white, or brown.

From last weeks newsday “The Locust Valley school board has placed longtime district Superintendent Anna F. Hunderfund on paid administrative leave, district officials said Tuesday.

Hunderfund is one of the highest-paid school administrators on Long Island, earning an annual salary of $385,297, according to the most recent 2017-18 data reported to the New York State Teachers Retirement System previously obtained by Newsday under the state's Freedom of Information Act.” cashing those checks on paid leave.. gotta be a good feeling! Isn’t LV a small district? how large is the district or how complex is the system she oversees?

Last edited by nyc555; 01-27-2019 at 10:41 PM..
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Old 01-28-2019, 06:27 AM
 
1,613 posts, read 2,085,216 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nyc555 View Post

From last weeks newsday “The Locust Valley school board has placed longtime district Superintendent Anna F. Hunderfund on paid administrative leave, district officials said Tuesday.

Hunderfund is one of the highest-paid school administrators on Long Island, earning an annual salary of $385,297, according to the most recent 2017-18 data reported to the New York State Teachers Retirement System previously obtained by Newsday under the state's Freedom of Information Act.” cashing those checks on paid leave.. gotta be a good feeling! Isn’t LV a small district? how large is the district or how complex is the system she oversees?

LV has a good deal of wealth (not saying every resident is wealthy BTW) and certainly the elected Board of Education's negotiation with her has resulted in her high-paying contract. Compensation has nothing to do with the size of the district nor the relative complexities of the job. She's been there quite a while with mixed results. Usually these folks hopscotch from district to district - she is a bit of an exception.
Naturally, her contract contains enormous due-process protections so the Board cannot fire her without a showing of just cause via an independent arbitrator. But they can remove her from her duties (while paying her) and hire another superintendent (which they have done). At some point her contract will expire or she will be bought out or she will resign or there will be a finding for/against her by an independent arbitrator. Fun fact: Her husband is the well-paid superintendent of Jericho School District.

Last edited by Quick Commenter; 01-28-2019 at 06:41 AM..
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Old 01-28-2019, 07:35 AM
 
43 posts, read 37,760 times
Reputation: 58
I hear you. Below is a link to Long island Superintendents salaries etc. 121 names listed.. goodness didn’t realize there were that many!!!Listed the top 10. Definitely a contributor to high costs. There is a facebook group that recently launched named “”Nassau School taxes” that I encourage everyone to join. It’s the first step to try organize i order to address these issues.

https://patch.com/new-york/greatneck...alaries-ranked

Salaries can be read in the following format: (salary); (benefits); (other); (total). Some school districts did not have "other" wages listed.

Anna F. Hunderfund, Locust Valley CSD— $352,475; $83,259; $15,800; $451,534
William H. Johnson, Rockville Centre UFSD— $341,403; $86,174; $20,000; $447,577
Henry L. Grishman, Jericho UFSD— $288,794; $85,422; $66,106; $440,322
Donald James, Commack UFSD— $298,574; $86,794; $29,393; $414,761
Kishore Kuncham, Freeport UFSD— $295,630; $85,507; $32,000; $413,137
Ralph Marino, Hewlett-Woodmere UFSD— $290,700; $70,119; $52,100; $412,919
Michael F. Ring, Rocky Point UFSD— $295,491; $91,266; $16,019; $402,776
Lorna Lewis, Plainview-Old Bethpage CSD— $298,700; $59,096; $29,000; $386,796
Edward A. Salina, Jr., Plainedge UFSD— $290,477; $66,720; $26,350; $383,547
Michael R. Lonergan, Longwood CSD— $285,000; $70,781; $26,070; $381,851
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Old 01-29-2019, 04:34 PM
 
10,387 posts, read 14,075,982 times
Reputation: 6535
Quote:
Originally Posted by FrugalPete View Post
This article is a joke, and the author is just looking for reactions. Pay up or shut up. Imagine if garden city and Hempstead districts combined
Baldwin is a unique district in that regard b/c you got white, rich harbor kids and then the North Baldwiners which a lot of them are black.
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