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Old 08-24-2008, 07:44 PM
 
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Back to the tax issue.

1. Consolidate school districts or at least the high schools. (too many administrators)

2. Consolidate police departments (get rid of village police depts.)

3. Consolidate fire depts.

4. institute a personal income tax on the wealthy in Nassau and Suffolk. Folks like Charles Wang can certainly afford to pay more in taxes. In fact anyone with an income of over $150,000 in my view should pay some sort of county income tax.

5. Stop obstructing guys like Charles Wang who want to develop Long Island. Wang had his Lighthouse project shot down, how about the guy that wants to build that mall in Syosset or the fellow who wants to build a tunnel from LI to Westchester. Long Island needs development which creates jobs and wealth needed to pay the taxes to support our schools, police, fire depts., parks, etc..

You can't have something for nothing...
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Old 08-25-2008, 09:18 AM
 
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After seeing the gigantic fire house in Medford just East of 112, I'd have to say there are some areas to cut there. Unless that thing was built on donations, the people who pay taxes to support that thing should be up in arms. It's a monstrosity!!

Definitely consolidating municipalities would help too. Why are there townships? In most places in the country, counties provide the services. Less total employees, lower taxes.

Personally, and I know this is just my opinion, libraries are one of the best bangs for your buck going. You can go there and entertain you family for nothing if you are so inclined...videos, books, the internet...it's all there.
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Old 08-25-2008, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Inis Fada
16,685 posts, read 27,956,954 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nbres View Post
Back to the tax issue.

1. Consolidate school districts or at least the high schools. (too many administrators)

2. Consolidate police departments (get rid of village police depts.)

3. Consolidate fire depts.

4. institute a personal income tax on the wealthy in Nassau and Suffolk. Folks like Charles Wang can certainly afford to pay more in taxes. In fact anyone with an income of over $150,000 in my view should pay some sort of county income tax.

5. Stop obstructing guys like Charles Wang who want to develop Long Island. Wang had his Lighthouse project shot down, how about the guy that wants to build that mall in Syosset or the fellow who wants to build a tunnel from LI to Westchester. Long Island needs development which creates jobs and wealth needed to pay the taxes to support our schools, police, fire depts., parks, etc..

You can't have something for nothing...
1) We already have some huge school districts which would probably be unable to consolidate in their entirety. The HS in these districts are big enough. Some (like Smithtown) have such a large population that they are back to the SHSE and SHSW configurations.

BUT there is no reason that administration (to some degree) and purchasing can't be consolidated. It might especially benefit the smaller districts to consolidate these aspects to save the taxpayers some money.

2) Some of the areas which pay for their PDs can afford to do so (I am forgetting the name of some of them in Nassau, but Lloyd Harbor, Belle Terre and Old Field residents can certainly afford theirs, which I believe they pay for in the community taxes. Does anyone know if they also pay for the SCPD in their property taxes? If they do, but don't fully utilize SCPD services, they are partially offsetting the bill for the rest of us. Add to the fact that these areas are limited access from the main roads (like 25A) and some of the homes will take longer to respond to. Ultimately the taxpayers might end up finding a few more police hired to cover the areas. They'll cite what I've written, 'longer response times' (union fear of God tactics) gerrymander the patrol area boundaries and BOOM more SCPD police. I think consolidating the PDs is a wash at best, or more expensive.

Areas which have their own PDs aren't always affluent. There are some areas which do see more crime (like the Southampton anomaly) as well Glen Cove (and is it Freeport? -- again, I am not on top of Nassau.) Consolidating PDs might take some of the tax burden off of those who aren't wealthy by eliminating the private PD portion of their village taxes. But they will end up paying in the county portion, maybe a little less, maybe the same.

3) Consolidate Fire Districts -- YES, they already offer one another mutual aid in large events. Given the sprawl and congestion on most of LI, all firehouses should remain open. What's about to occur in Setauket is a travesty -- the FD admins are preparing to push a huge building proposal through even though the residents already rejected it. It would seem that the Setauket FD heads need to have a big, fancy firehouse like Medford's.
This is taking 'keeping up with the Joneses' to an extreme.

4) $150K is too low. There are many families who are making close to that (two incomes) and are living ok, not rolling in dough. Also, the people in that category start falling into the dreaded AMT zone, so while they look like they are making more, they are also already paying more out in taxes.

I know a woman from a local news board who is a teacher, hubby is self employed and they were making enough to put them into the AMT category; she is far from wealthy.

I think if you gave it a tweak -- $200K and up -- you might eliminate some of the 'regular' people who are getting hit with the AMT (more and more LIers each year) and go for those who can more readily handle it.

5) I am for smart, planned growth and development without plowing down the last blade of grass or tree in the process. Some of the initiatives to save open space sound great, but who have they benefited? There was an article in the Newsday a few months back about land being preserved in some exclusive area in which none of us regular people would be able to go and enjoy it. That's a bad use of taxpayer money.

The Lighthouse project looked to be something ideal for that area. How many or which school districts would stand to gain from it? Or would Wang be given some form of a sweetheart deal?

Trump on the Ocean -- bad idea. A company like that should not be allowed to profit on the backs of the taxpayers. NYS Parks are supported by the taxpayers, and NYS Parks do not pay into the school districts, fire districts, etc.
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Old 08-25-2008, 12:42 PM
 
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We can't be scared of development to the point of knee jerking at every proposal to build. why is it that almost every new apartment/town home complex that goes up is 55 and over? I guess we can say they don't put any more bodies in the schools, but sheesh.

What is going on with the huge "self sustained" development that was supposed to go on at the Pilgrim State site? Contaminated soil?
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Old 08-25-2008, 04:01 PM
 
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Oh yes - the hatred of any building that will increase school population (by which they mean--they're afraid not just of more kids but of families with lower incomes being able to live in better school districts) is awful. A lot of LI towns have a very high entry point because they're all single-family houses or at best luxury condos. Moving further out isn't always an option; young families (who may actually be well educated and on the road to affluence, but are still paying off student loans and getting established) are priced out. I'm 31 and the people I know who are my age and buying in most of Nassau are either 1) very high earners or 2) getting help from their parents. If my husband hadn't bought his apartment (not in NYC) in his 20s in a rising market, there is no way we'd even have a chance of buying in 95% of Nassau now.

Not really a tax issue, though, just LI inability to think for the future.
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Old 08-25-2008, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Inis Fada
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Then there's the people who could afford to buy in areas which aren't considered 'nice' that we know they exist in Nassau. Look at the gentrification in Harlem and Brooklyn -- there are plenty of communities in Nassau which would be ripe for this but no one has the nerve to be the first 'different' family on the block.

Areas which have received a bad rap can gradually turn around with the help of some adventurous souls and good community relations. The influx of younger people who can pump some money into a community, requiring services now absent from them (cleaners, drug stores, grocery stores, etc.) will help bring in a commercial tax base.

But people tell me I'm tripping because no one has the foresight to look into such communities and rehab existing building stock. Everyone has to have new. Everyone has to have the best. It's that LI entitlement thing, rearing it's ugly head. They would sooner complain about not being able to afford a house, or struggle to have a new house next to the LIRR in a more desirable zip code and complain about their exorbitant taxes.

The Bronx is making a comeback. So can Hempstead, Roosevelt, Wyandanch, etc.
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Old 08-26-2008, 08:38 AM
 
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It's not the entitlement issue or the ability to rehab housing stock. It's the schools. In NYC, parents either expect to pay private school tuition or know how to work the system (look at the schools where the zoned program is 90% minority and G&T is 90% white). On LI you can't do that. With the taxes (and poor districts do not mean low taxes, especially in low tax base areas like Roosevelt) you can't afford tuition and you can't work the system--it's local school or nothing. Parents can't afford to wait 10 years to get the schools up again--they'd rather avoid these districts entirely. The only way to do it would be wholesale demolition and rebuild (or some other means of getting people in en masse) and we see how well that worked when they proposed it in Hempstead.

A lot of gentrification in NYC is also driven by people with no children, and LI is less appealing for them.
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Old 08-26-2008, 08:40 AM
 
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Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
Then there's the people who could afford to buy in areas which aren't considered 'nice' that we know they exist in Nassau. Look at the gentrification in Harlem and Brooklyn -- there are plenty of communities in Nassau which would be ripe for this but no one has the nerve to be the first 'different' family on the block.

Areas which have received a bad rap can gradually turn around with the help of some adventurous souls and good community relations. The influx of younger people who can pump some money into a community, requiring services now absent from them (cleaners, drug stores, grocery stores, etc.) will help bring in a commercial tax base.

But people tell me I'm tripping because no one has the foresight to look into such communities and rehab existing building stock. Everyone has to have new. Everyone has to have the best. It's that LI entitlement thing, rearing it's ugly head. They would sooner complain about not being able to afford a house, or struggle to have a new house next to the LIRR in a more desirable zip code and complain about their exorbitant taxes.

The Bronx is making a comeback. So can Hempstead, Roosevelt, Wyandanch, etc.

Unfortunately, the young people who gentrify sketchy neighborhoods are usually in their early to mid 20's, and don't have kids and may not be thinking about having kids at all. Those people have little or no interest in moving to Wyandanch or Roosevelt because Long Island is viewed as a cultural wasteland. They'll move to Bushwick because they are a few subway stops from hipsterdom.

Most people moving to LI have or plan on having families, and don't feel right throwing their kids into a war zone as a gentrification experiment. ]

So, I like your theory, but it's not happening because there's no motivation for any would-be "pioneers" like there is in the 5 boroughs.
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Old 08-26-2008, 01:59 PM
 
Location: home...finally, home .
8,177 posts, read 18,034,806 times
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The Bronx is making a comeback. So can Hempstead, Roosevelt, Wyandanch, etc.



They did try this with Central Islip , with subsidized homes & all. The community never did turn around unfortunately.
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Old 08-26-2008, 02:18 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nancy thereader View Post
The Bronx is making a comeback. So can Hempstead, Roosevelt, Wyandanch, etc.



They did try this with Central Islip , with subsidized homes & all. The community never did turn around unfortunately.
Yep, there are some really nice townhomes there on the grounds of the old hospital, but I would never send my kid to that school district.
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