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Unread 06-24-2009, 06:58 PM
 
123 posts, read 166,086 times
Reputation: 65
Newsday had a great editorial awhile back called "Long Island's dirty little secret" and it spoke of the nepotism in the public school sector. Ask any wanna be teacher about trying to get a job in a public school on LI and they will tell you it is a joke. All positions have to be posted but are usually filled by someone who knows someone. Even knowing a principal is not enough nowadays. As for the superintendent I'm sure they could find someone at a lower salary (most jobs are paid as per experience). To just say they would have to hire someone anyway is not an answer, hire someone for lower pay. He was making his salary because he worked his way up, not all superintendents start at that salary. This goes on in the NYPD, you can retire and be rehired if 6 months pass, thus collecting pension and pay.
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Unread 06-24-2009, 07:27 PM
 
329 posts, read 491,828 times
Reputation: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherNYer View Post
Newsday had a great editorial awhile back called "Long Island's dirty little secret" and it spoke of the nepotism in the public school sector. Ask any wanna be teacher about trying to get a job in a public school on LI and they will tell you it is a joke. All positions have to be posted but are usually filled by someone who knows someone. Even knowing a principal is not enough nowadays.
Like most things, nepotism is blown out of proportion. Weren't you a former LI teacher? how did you get the job?

I got my job from the NY times, knew nobody. Of the 20 people in my department, possibly 1 or 2 of them had tie in's, everyone else simply applied and were the most qualified for the position. They came from other districts where they also got jobs through their own merits. Same goes for most of the other teachers I know. There are some cases that nepotism does happen, but people make it seem like 95% of hires are through a buddy system and its impossible to get a job otherwise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by anotherNYer View Post
As for the superintendent I'm sure they could find someone at a lower salary (most jobs are paid as per experience). To just say they would have to hire someone anyway is not an answer, hire someone for lower pay. He was making his salary because he worked his way up, not all superintendents start at that salary. This goes on in the NYPD, you can retire and be rehired if 6 months pass, thus collecting pension and pay.
The 'lower' paid superintendent will not be that much lower paid and the new hire will offset this lower pay by now having to have paid benefits and pension for an additional person while the retiree already has these factored in whether he works or not. Most districts hire experienced superintendents and this commands a higher salary. The school board does not want to hire a newbie to run the district.
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Unread 06-24-2009, 08:53 PM
 
Location: Brookville
82 posts, read 100,857 times
Reputation: 23
Default Won't buy ur dime for a quarter

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeadPool1998 View Post
86% isn't bad unless you know what the ideal percentage is. What should it be?
[CENTER]We don't have a trillion-dollar debt because we haven't taxed enough; we have a trillion-dollar debt because we spend too much.[/CENTER]
-- Ronald Reagan


All I know is that is the budget is 86% of Salary/Benefits/Pension,
why:
Are they still recieving raises while threatening to cut services to Children and budgets are increased, and people can't afford to stay here.

Poll shows many mull leaving state : Home: The Buffalo News (http://www.buffalonews.com/home/story/683909.html - broken link)
As of 2009, Nassau County's population is 1,306,533 people. Since 2000, it has had a population growth of -0.67 percent, while the rest of United States population increased 5.88%.
[CENTER] [/CENTER]

As ILoveitBut said, "What is the ratio in Private Schools?"
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Unread 06-24-2009, 09:09 PM
 
Location: Brookville
82 posts, read 100,857 times
Reputation: 23
Default Won't buy ur dime for a quarter

Great feedback: Thought you guys may want other Facts:

Nassau County public schools spend $12,034 per student. The average school expenditure in the U.S. is $6,058. There are about 14 students per teacher in Nassau County.

According to the Long Island Index, .(Long Island Index: 2009 Report & Key Findings) 64% of people of Nassau County from ages 18 to 34 say, ďThey are somewhat to very likely to leave Long Island to a region with less property taxes.

Among the anomalies the Index reports, in districts where student needs are greatest, per-pupil spending is the least. By contrast, in districts where large sums are spent, academic achievement is no higher than in mid-range schools.

ďLocal officials add that contract raises are based largely on regional patterns, making it difficult, if not impossible, for individual districts to establish salary schedules much different from those in neighboring systems. They further contend their powers to negotiate are restricted by the so-called Triborough provision in state labor law, which guarantees teachers and other public employees can continue collecting those incremental "step" raises, even when contracts have expired and are being renegotiated.Ē

Mar. 8, 2009 (McClatchy-Tribune Regional News delivered by Newstex) -- Even in the face of a souring economy, many Long Island school districts have approved hefty raises for teachers that soon will push salaries to more than $140,000 a year for the highest earners.
A Newsday review of 10 new teacher contracts -- all signed after experts began warning late in 2007 of looming financial troubles -- finds typical raises for the coming school year of more than 6 percent. Surpassing that, many individual teachers are due increases of better than 7 percent or 8 percent.
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Unread 06-24-2009, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Brookville
82 posts, read 100,857 times
Reputation: 23
Default Won't buy ur dime for a quarter

As some of you know, Tom Golisano, the man behind the Albany mess wrote an article in the Buffalo news two months ago: It's a must read.



Stateís excessive spending drives people, businesses out of New York (http://www.buffalonews.com/367/story/688135.html - broken link)

By Tom Golisano



Education: New York spends the most, per pupil, in America on education, spending 63 percent above the national average. Costs went up about 60 percent in the last decade ($12.7 billion in 1999 and $20.7 billion in 2009).
Like health care, education is something worth spending on and worth investing in, but weíre spending more and getting less. New York City schools graduated 54 percent of high school students in 2007; Buffalo, 47 percent; and Rochester, 45 percent.
Why? Perhaps itís because the New York State teachers union, with its $114 million budget, is always trying to persuade Albany to spend more. Maybe itís because itís mandatory that all teachers pay union dues. Whatever the cause, when faced with potential cuts, the union and its allies have one response: increase taxes.
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Unread 06-25-2009, 06:58 AM
 
7,109 posts, read 6,714,374 times
Reputation: 2651
Quote:
Originally Posted by thepokerdepot View Post
As some of you know, Tom Golisano, the man behind the Albany mess wrote an article in the Buffalo news two months ago: It's a must read.



Stateís excessive spending drives people, businesses out of New York (http://www.buffalonews.com/367/story/688135.html - broken link)

By Tom Golisano



Education: New York spends the most, per pupil, in America on education, spending 63 percent above the national average. Costs went up about 60 percent in the last decade ($12.7 billion in 1999 and $20.7 billion in 2009).
Like health care, education is something worth spending on and worth investing in, but weíre spending more and getting less. New York City schools graduated 54 percent of high school students in 2007; Buffalo, 47 percent; and Rochester, 45 percent.
Why? Perhaps itís because the New York State teachers union, with its $114 million budget, is always trying to persuade Albany to spend more. Maybe itís because itís mandatory that all teachers pay union dues. Whatever the cause, when faced with potential cuts, the union and its allies have one response: increase taxes.
I'd like to see the graduation rates for every major city in the country. I'll bet they aren't better, if not worse, than that. Yes, people drop out of high school in inner cities. Welcome to post 1960 life.
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Unread 06-25-2009, 07:47 AM
 
1,002 posts, read 2,224,096 times
Reputation: 145
Tom Golisano lives in FL and doesn't pay NY taxes. He's lost his right to say anything about what we pay.
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Unread 06-25-2009, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Brookville
82 posts, read 100,857 times
Reputation: 23
Default Won't buy ur dime for a quarter

Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexisT View Post
Tom Golisano lives in FL and doesn't pay NY taxes. He's lost his right to say anything about what we pay.
He just moved to FL, and he has paid more New York taxes than a small country.
He is the one of the very few voices taxpayers have in curbing uncontrolled State spending. Love him or hate him.
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Unread 06-26-2009, 10:15 AM
 
163 posts, read 190,630 times
Reputation: 57
Yesterday I spoke to a high school friend who moved to Ft. Lauderdale years ago. He says the teachers pay is not high there and taxes are very low. He also mentioned that someone he knows is teaching at my old elementary school and making 92K!! It was with such admiration that he mentioned this. Like this person working at my old run down elementary school on the Queens/Nassau border has hit the lotto or something...
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Unread 06-26-2009, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Brookville
82 posts, read 100,857 times
Reputation: 23
Default Won't buy ur dime for a quarter

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mantaray14 View Post
Yesterday I spoke to a high school friend who moved to Ft. Lauderdale years ago. He says the teachers pay is not high there and taxes are very low. He also mentioned that someone he knows is teaching at my old elementary school and making 92K!! It was with such admiration that he mentioned this. Like this person working at my old run down elementary school on the Queens/Nassau border has hit the lotto or something...

For sure. Funny thing, two of my cousins work as Teachers in Queens,..PS schools. Their pay is ok, alot less than Nassau, and some kids are very disrespectful. They have been trying to get hired on the Island for years because of the pay/benefits and tame children. The line is long to get a shot to teach full-time on the Island.
I'm sure my cousins and many other great teachers would work in Nassau for the same pay/benefits they recieve in Queens and be happy about it.

92k, plus 70k/year lifetime pension, plus free health care for life,..... for 9 months of work, 39 1/2 hours weeks,...
all of this paid by taxpayer who's making 60k/year, no pension and no Healthcare working 40hrs a week for 12 months a year.

Do it for the Kids!
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