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Old 03-16-2010, 08:03 PM
 
815 posts, read 1,165,819 times
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Physics is difficult. I attempted to teach it for 30 years and finally retired (gave up).
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Old 03-16-2010, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Westbury,NY
2,529 posts, read 4,487,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
Pines -- the wet evergreen needles and cones helped to make the tree even heavier, which certainly did not help at all. Also, a pine tree is full whereas the oaks, maples, etc., being deciduous in nature, didn't have any leaves on them to offer further wind resistance. (Think sail vs no sail.) If this were to have occurred later in the season with trees in full leaf, it would probably have been that much worse.
I disagree, as there are different types of pines. First of all, not all evergreens are pines. Many are planted norway spruces, which are NOT native to our area and thus not tolerant of high winds, heavy rain, and storms. Same goes for White Pine, again, not native.
I took a walk in the pine barrens today and saw hardly any trees down at all. The trees of the Pine Barrens, particularly, Pitch Pine, are very strong trees and very tolerant of storms.
Here's some links for folks to tell the different types of evergreen trees apart.
Norway Spruce (non-native to LI, planted)
http://www.norwayspruce.com/images/norway_front.jpg

White Pine (non native to LI, planted)
http://bio.bd.psu.edu/plant_web/Pinaceae/White_Pine_03_Plant.jpg (broken link)

Pitch Pine (native to LI, grows naturally)
http://www.fws.gov/northeast/longislandrefuges/Images%20-%20Shared/PitchPine.jpg (broken link)

It just irks me that so many ppl choose to plant non-natives. Especially White Pine, which is very weak and comes down very easily.
Next time plant Pitch Pine!
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Old 03-16-2010, 10:34 PM
 
Location: bay shore
518 posts, read 1,074,664 times
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Originally Posted by Coney View Post
Yes, Sean, basically the whole roof lifted off like an airplane wing getting lift. Then it smashed against things and broke up. I've been living here almost 30 years and this has never happened. The roof was reinforced and repaired last May. My back storm door also broke off at the hinges, but it didn't fly away. The damage is incredible. On Saturday night, I might have been able to salvage more items in the house, if I could have seen what I was doing. This was an incredible double whammy. No electricty at night time and losing a roof. I didn't realize how much water was coming in because I couldn't really see exactly where it was coming from or how much there was with the use of flashlights. We all got wet and went to bed soaked and cold since there was no heat.

Still no cable here either. I got a constant busy signal all day on Sunday but finally reached them at around 1 AM Monday morning. They couldn't give me a time when it would be fixed. I have a regular landline phone that was fine until today (Monday) and I keep getting bumped off the internet. It's pretty isolating, no TV, no phone, no internet.
in both of your posts it seems your more concerned about the cable being out that the roof coming off your house...
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Old 03-17-2010, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
13,917 posts, read 16,565,656 times
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Originally Posted by Johninwestbury View Post
I disagree, as there are different types of pines. First of all, not all evergreens are pines.

It just irks me that so many ppl choose to plant non-natives. Especially White Pine, which is very weak and comes down very easily.
Next time plant Pitch Pine!
Conversely all pines are evergreens. The poster in question stated 'pines' and did not discuss genus and species.

Many people plant non-native, it's not something that is going to change anytime soon. We can tell them the bane which is kudzu, but people are still going to pick what they pick -- unless the USDA starts establishing laws about what can not be planted in a given region.

I believe many people stay away from pitch pine as it is not as aesthetically pleasing than the white pines, Norways, et. al.
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Old 03-17-2010, 09:09 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
13,917 posts, read 16,565,656 times
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Originally Posted by Fastrudy View Post
Physics is difficult. I attempted to teach it for 30 years and finally retired (gave up).
Glad you're retired. I would have hated to have received a 0 on the Newton's Law quiz!
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Old 03-17-2010, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Westbury,NY
2,529 posts, read 4,487,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
Conversely all pines are evergreens. The poster in question stated 'pines' and did not discuss genus and species.

Many people plant non-native, it's not something that is going to change anytime soon. We can tell them the bane which is kudzu, but people are still going to pick what they pick -- unless the USDA starts establishing laws about what can not be planted in a given region.

I believe many people stay away from pitch pine as it is not as aesthetically pleasing than the white pines, Norways, et. al.
I'm different, Pitch Pines seem alot more vibrant to me than White Pines. White Pines have a dull shape to them, very stratiform, but Pitch Pines always form great shapes.
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Old 03-17-2010, 11:24 PM
 
3,662 posts, read 3,178,764 times
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Originally Posted by Fastrudy View Post
Physics is difficult. I attempted to teach it for 30 years and finally retired (gave up).
I attempted to learn physics for 30 years and finally gave up.
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Old 03-18-2010, 07:10 AM
 
217 posts, read 301,164 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johninwestbury View Post
I took a walk in the pine barrens today and saw hardly any trees down at all.
That might have more to do with a stand of trees offering wind protection to their brethren than the strength of the trees

I noticed that where people had recently taken out large trees, the trees close to them were the most damaged.
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Old 03-18-2010, 07:22 AM
 
Location: Inis Fada
13,917 posts, read 16,565,656 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Johninwestbury View Post
I'm different, Pitch Pines seem alot more vibrant to me than White Pines. White Pines have a dull shape to them, very stratiform, but Pitch Pines always form great shapes.
The humble pitch pine doesn't necessarily have the conical shape, or full appearance, which is what some people look for in a conifer. They're great to see in huge clusters out in the pine barrens, but then most of them are competing for light and lacking for pruning, leaving them looking scrappy. Most homeowners do not share the same appreciation for them which you have.

Perhaps someday there will be legislation preventing people in core pitch pine areas from removing them. My parents are in Florida and they have laws protecting the live oaks there.
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Old 03-18-2010, 08:36 AM
 
7,338 posts, read 7,853,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OhBeeHave View Post
The humble pitch pine doesn't necessarily have the conical shape, or full appearance, which is what some people look for in a conifer. They're great to see in huge clusters out in the pine barrens, but then most of them are competing for light and lacking for pruning, leaving them looking scrappy. Most homeowners do not share the same appreciation for them which you have.

Perhaps someday there will be legislation preventing people in core pitch pine areas from removing them. My parents are in Florida and they have laws protecting the live oaks there.
Pitch pines, ie scrub pines, are hideous. I had one in my back yard growing up and it was the "ugly" tree compared to the huge oak, maple, and dogwoods we had.

I'm against cutting any trees down, by the way.
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