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Old 06-11-2010, 01:45 PM
 
72 posts, read 200,004 times
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(I pulled this from another thread... got my curiosity stirring. I am from Chicago, but always loved LA)

Good shot - I am curious, exactly where is this shot taken from, and which direction does it face?

Maybe for another thread... but why does it seem like I've heard people talk down on the 'valley'... it looks like a really nice area. Could be just stigma, or too much TV... but I am not from LA


Quote:
Originally Posted by happ View Post
Here's what the San Fernando Valley looks like now [no more smog
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Old 06-11-2010, 02:29 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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That appears to be the SFV looking towards the west. That would be the Santa Susana Mtns near Chatsworth on the far horizon.

I believe the concrete channel in the middle of the photo is the lovely Los Angeles river which begins in Canoga Park and flows over 50 miles past downtown LA all the way to the Pacific Ocean near Long Beach. The LA River MasterPlan is aimed at "greening" the river and making it a "greenway" with bikepaths and walking trails. This has already been done in bits and pieces at some ponits along the river. The long-term plan is to do that for the entire stretch of the river.

I grew up in the valley. I will say the following:

1. The valley has MANY different types of neighbhroods from exclusive hillside communities with large homes and celebrities (Sherman Oaks, Encinco, Tarzana to name a few) to more working class areas with a gritty side like Van Nuys or North Hollywood.

2. The Valley's climate is LESS desirable than "over the hill" in the LA basin. I know, as a chicago guy, you are probably laughing. But in the summer it can be 10 to 20 degrees hotter in the day in the valley than in places like West LA or Santa Monica. Also, the winter months get a bit cooler in the valey as compared to West LA or Santa Monica. The valley is virtually surrounded by moutains so in the summer it heats up, etc.

3. The Valley was traditionally a "bedroom" community of LA. A more "quiet" suburban locale without the urban edge or hipness of other parts of the LA basin (e.g., Hollywood, Westwood, Echo park, Santa Monica, Venice, etc).

4. The primary cultural institutions of LA are all located on the other side of the hill (by "over the hill" I mean the Santa Monica Mtns)...so the valley has no major cultural institutions or art museums. I think this is one reason people put it down. The crticism is true but that doesn't mean there are not very nice neighborhoods in the valley.

5. One true gem of the valley is the Sepulveda Dam Recreation area also known as Balboa Park. Bigger than NYC's central park (I think) it is a wonderful urban park. Wish LA had more places like that.

For the record, I left the valley once I got old enough to be on my own. Precisely because it's kind of boring, as compared to other more exciting, urban parts of LA. That said, there is nothing "wrong" with the valley. Most of it is typically middle-class Americana....with palm trees and swimming pools.
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Old 06-11-2010, 02:35 PM
 
Location: South Bay
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the pic is definitely looking southeast. after looking at a map, i'm assuming the neighborhood in the foreground is arleta as you can see Arleta Ave and the 5 parellel to the channel in the left part of the pic. i believe that the mountiain that the channel is running towards is the backside of mount lee (the hollywood sign is on the other side).
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Old 06-11-2010, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,346 posts, read 80,739,113 times
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Here's a similar shot, looking west into the west San Fernando Valley.

That's Topanga Plaza under construction in the background on the top right. View is looking west over Victory in 1963. The street with the pepper trees running left and right about in the middle is Canoga. Now Warner Center is where all those fields are. The biggest building was May Company anchoring the north side with the Broadway (not built yet in this photo) anchoring the eastside. "Monkey" Wards was in the middle.

The railway which goes up from the bottom and and curves to the right is now the busway.

I grew up in the top right corner of this photo, around Saticoy and Fallbrook.

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Old 06-11-2010, 03:27 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BRinSM View Post
the pic is definitely looking southeast. after looking at a map, i'm assuming the neighborhood in the foreground is arleta as you can see Arleta Ave and the 5 parellel to the channel in the left part of the pic. i believe that the mountiain that the channel is running towards is the backside of mount lee (the hollywood sign is on the other side).
For sure. You can see the 5 in the distance breaking more east at the 170, according to the g-map topography, that gap in mountains at the top left of the shot has to be around Burbank. good eye BRinSM

SoCal 35 - good lookin out! Those are valuable observations about the SFV. I never knew the climate was so drastically different than in the basin. Why is it there was so much smog there back in the 50's, but not anymore? Could be I am deprived of some coastal-climate knowledge that may be obvious to californians...

It does look like the suburbs with palm trees....
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Old 06-11-2010, 03:53 PM
 
Location: South Bay
7,091 posts, read 18,414,084 times
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there used to be a lot of farming in the valley 50+ years ago, so this maybe the answer to your question:
Smudge pot - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 06-11-2010, 04:26 PM
 
4,028 posts, read 8,297,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawn View Post
(I pulled this from another thread... got my curiosity stirring. I am from Chicago, but always loved LA)

Good shot - I am curious, exactly where is this shot taken from, and which direction does it face?

Maybe for another thread... but why does it seem like I've heard people talk down on the 'valley'... it looks like a really nice area. Could be just stigma, or too much TV... but I am not from LA
Lots of the SFV is just really run down. Lots of the neighborhoods used to be very nice but now are not. City of LA(which SFV is part of) at some point just had the worst planning of any big city ever and allowed any type of structure to be built at almost any location. So what you have through much of the SFV is the major streets are filled with run down apartments that have no architechtural ryhme or reason and houses on the side streets that get impacted by the residents of the apartments. I think the area where this is most evident is the area of North Hollywood that is south of Sherman way and east of Fulton. Nice enough houses on the side streets, but extremely depressed real estate prices due to the spillover from the apartments.

The problems are many:

-People illegally converting garages. I know a Tarzana SFR neighborhood where street parking is difficult because nearly every home on the street has converted their garage.

-People don't take care of their lawn/landscaping.

-Graffiti in many many locations. Taggers hit a newly constructed townhome near Victory and Fulton earlier this week.

-Many once nice areas look really blighted and distressed. Downtown Reseda, significant areas of Canoga Park, Panorama City, Van Nuys on VN Bl., Sun Valley, even parts of Northridge are getting that way.
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Old 06-11-2010, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Earth
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnG72 View Post
Lots of the SFV is just really run down. Lots of the neighborhoods used to be very nice but now are not. City of LA(which SFV is part of)
Except for Burbank, Calabasas, and San Fernando which are all independent cities.

Burbank and Calabasas have their own school districts which is why they are still attractive to families (unlike neighboring areas which are under LAUSD, an unspeakable nightmare) and have less crime than neighboring areas of the Valley that are under LAPD jurisdiction. That's why Burbank rents and housing prices are higher than neighboring North Hollywood and why Calabasas rents and prices are higher than neighboring Woodland Hills.

San Fernando is in LAUSD, is poor and working class and is almost all Latino, but has lower crime rates than many more affluent Valley neighborhoods within the city of L.A. let alone neighboring areas within the city of L.A. like Pacoima (the most dangerous place in the Valley), Sun Valley, etc. It has its own police department and its population is very settled - there are not that many immigrants, many families have been there since the Valley was rural, and people have pride in the community because it is a separate city.

The independent cities of the Valley doing better than the Valley within the city of L.A. is a big reason why Valley secessionism has been popular. If North Hollywood, Van Nuys, or Reseda were separate cities they would be in better shape.

Quote:
at some point just had the worst planning of any big city ever and allowed any type of structure to be built at almost any location.
L.A. didn't have zoning before 1950. Ironically, the areas built before zoning came in are better planned than those built after zoning came in. L.A. has long had horrible planning - mainly because it's always been a city "of the developers, by the developers, and for the developers

Quote:
So what you have through much of the SFV is the major streets are filled with run down apartments that have no architechtural ryhme or reason and houses on the side streets that get impacted by the residents of the apartments. I think the area where this is most evident is the area of North Hollywood that is south of Sherman way and east of Fulton. Nice enough houses on the side streets, but extremely depressed real estate prices due to the spillover from the apartments.
Those apartments and houses were unfortunately built at just about the nadir of architecture and building in the western world - 1950-70.

The area around Sherman Way is a bad area for many reasons, the apartments being probably one of the least of them. Van Nuys and deep North Hollywood used to be functional, salt of the earth, working class neighborhoods that were based on high paying blue collar jobs at GM, Lockheed, and the studios. GM and Lockheed closed down and with so much production leaving the L.A. area the studios no longer needed so many blue collar workers. Once the jobs were gone, those areas went to crap. The most affluent part of North Hollywood decided to break away and call itself "Valley Village" (new neighborhoods being carved out of existing ones is very common in the Valley, the first that I know of was when the then-mostly white Arleta was carved out of almost entirely Latino Pacoima back in the '70s. Arleta's overwhelmingly Latino today btw).

Outside of the city of Burbank itself, Burbank Blvd. is generally considered the dividing line between the "good Valley" and "bad Valley", although North Hollywood does have some ok pockets between Burbank and Oxnard. it really varies street by street though. North of Oxnard St., fuggetaboutit! Van Nuys, outside of its extreme south bordering on Valley Village and Sherman Oaks, is a craphole, and unless you just came across the border or just got out of prison you probably wouldn't like it. Panorama City and North Hills were casualties of the GM plant closing (although parts of North Hills had drug and prostitution problems even when North Hills was called Sepulveda and was overwhelmingly non-Latino white) and are quite nasty.


Quote:
The problems are many:

-People illegally converting garages. I know a Tarzana SFR neighborhood where street parking is difficult because nearly every home on the street has converted their garage.
Not a problem confined to the Valley, nor a problem confined to "poor" areas.

Quote:
People don't take care of their lawn/landscaping.
It's expensive to keep up lawns and landscaping that don't fit with the SoCal climate. Builders in most of the 20th century tried to make lawns more appropriate for the East or Midwest than the Southwest, back when water was cheap and easily available. As the water problem looks to dwarf every other problem L.A. has, it's not efficient to maintain that sort of lawn or landscaping. Desert plants would make more sense.

Quote:
Graffiti in many many locations. Taggers hit a newly constructed townhome near Victory and Fulton earlier this week.

-Many once nice areas look really blighted and distressed. Downtown Reseda, significant areas of Canoga Park, Panorama City, Van Nuys on VN Bl., Sun Valley, even parts of Northridge are getting that way.
Agree although Sun Valley has been very run down for decades. Northridge even when I lived there in the '80s had some bad areas, and given what has happened to the Valley as a whole since then, I'm not surprised they've spread.
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Old 06-11-2010, 05:51 PM
 
72 posts, read 200,004 times
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Majoun - nice. Very thorough. I am moving out there sometime this year when the $ is right (Sorry to all those people who are sick of the "I'm moving to LA" posts... ; )

Anyway, from all the research I have done thus far, it seems like the Burbank, NoHo area is good for someone like myself. Experienced producer, early 30's, with connections, looking for a somewhat affordable area to live and work... with decent, but not necessarily immediate access to nightlife etc. Basically industry/film work is my 1st focus when looking for a place to live.

Being from chicago's west side, I got the feeling that places like Long Beach, and the above-mentioned areas would be the kind of vibe I am looking for. I am accustomed to run-down/industrial, but quiet and not necessarily crime-ridden neighborhoods.
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Old 06-11-2010, 06:20 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
787 posts, read 1,622,673 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jlawn View Post
For sure. You can see the 5 in the distance breaking more east at the 170, according to the g-map topography, that gap in mountains at the top left of the shot has to be around Burbank. good eye BRinSM

SoCal 35 - good lookin out! Those are valuable observations about the SFV. I never knew the climate was so drastically different than in the basin. Why is it there was so much smog there back in the 50's, but not anymore? Could be I am deprived of some coastal-climate knowledge that may be obvious to californians...

It does look like the suburbs with palm trees....

Could have sworn it was looking west....but yes it's southeast.

The improvement in smog is due to cleaner technology and tighter regulations on tailpipe emissions. The smog has vastly improved but within the City of LA; however, the valley still has the worst air quality.

We are still a prisoner of our geography--mountains plus ocean = inversion layer. LA's air quality still has a long way to go....but no doubt the smog in the 1950's was VERY, VERY BAD. I wasn't alive in the 1950's but old news reels or reports will show how bad it was. Even just 20 or 25 years ago it was still pretty bad.

There is a new book out called "Smogtown: the Lung Burning History of Los Angeles" by Jacobs & Kelly. Have not read it but looks for interesting.

www.lasmogtown.com
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