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Old 06-12-2010, 11:14 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
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I think Los Angeles within city limits probably has the highest mountains of any major American city. Mulholland Drive is over 2000' & higher in Malibu. I think Portland is hilly w/ nearby mountains just like Seattle. Mountains give lots of character but make rapid transit difficult.
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Old 06-12-2010, 11:21 PM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
I think Los Angeles within city limits probably has the highest mountains of any major American city. Mulholland Drive is over 2000' & higher in Malibu. I think Portland is hilly w/ nearby mountains just like Seattle. Mountains give lots of character but make rapid transit difficult.
Yeah but Portland's hills can't compete with Seattle's.

I did not know there were hills 200 feet in the LA city limits! That's pretty high for sure.
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Old 06-13-2010, 12:02 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Actually, according to wikipedia the highest point in the CITY of Los Angeles is Mount Lukens, also called Sister Elsie Peak which reaches 5,080 feet.

Located at the far reaches of the northeastern part of the San Fernando Valley.

I am guessing no U.S. City has the change in elevation that LA exhibits (sea level to over 5,000 feet). Granted places like Santa Fe and Denver are higher in elevation but they are flat inside the city limits.

Of course, LA County has peaks that rise above 10,000 feet.
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Old 06-13-2010, 01:19 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal35 View Post
Actually, according to wikipedia the highest point in the CITY of Los Angeles is Mount Lukens, also called Sister Elsie Peak which reaches 5,080 feet.

Located at the far reaches of the northeastern part of the San Fernando Valley.

I am guessing no U.S. City has the change in elevation that LA exhibits (sea level to over 5,000 feet). Granted places like Santa Fe and Denver are higher in elevation but they are flat inside the city limits.

Of course, LA County has peaks that rise above 10,000 feet.
Dude, you have to drive 40 minutes outside San Diego to get to 5,000 feet. That's crazy that within the city limits of one city, you have beaches and sub-alpine areas.
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Old 06-13-2010, 03:53 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Dude, you have to drive 40 minutes outside San Diego to get to 5,000 feet. That's crazy that within the city limits of one city, you have beaches and sub-alpine areas.

No doubt that LA and LA County has more diverse elevation than San Diego.

That said, to be fair, getting to Mt. Lukens from downtown LA or West LA could take a while. And it is by far NOT LA's prettiest peak.

Mt Lukens, highest place in City of Los Angeles, 5074' on Flickr - Photo Sharing! (http://www.flickr.com/photos/edhiker/3294768357/in/pool-lagroup - broken link)
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Old 06-13-2010, 04:16 PM
 
31,629 posts, read 32,499,076 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by subPrimeTime View Post
One thing I like about LA (and SF) is the change in topography (ie hills, slopes) in different parts of the city. It makes for great views and distinctive neighborhoods. I'm not talking about having moutains nearby to ski at, which is great of course, but mainly within the city.

I feel like other big cities (chicago, NY, philly, DC) are mainly flat. Is this true more or less? Even though I've been to all these cities at one point, I didn't really pay attention to topography.

Of course, the drawback to these hills is a less walkable city, which LA has the reputation of being.
Although NYC is not as spread out as L.A., it does have hilly areas.
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Old 06-13-2010, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Pasadena
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gentoo View Post
Yeah but Portland's hills can't compete with Seattle's.

I did not know there were hills 200 feet in the LA city limits! That's pretty high for sure.
2000 feet [not 200 any old town has a 200 foot hill but not many have 2000' mountains or to be accurate per SoCal35 : 5,080 feet
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Old 06-14-2010, 12:51 AM
 
Location: San Diego, California Republic
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Quote:
Originally Posted by californio sur View Post
2000 feet [not 200 any old town has a 200 foot hill but not many have 2000' mountains or to be accurate per SoCal35 : 5,080 feet
typo. I meant 2,000 feet
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Old 06-14-2010, 01:02 AM
 
Location: The Bay
6,920 posts, read 12,246,118 times
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Oakland is very hilly, even in the "Flatlands"... just from some of the pics I've taken:


http://img697.imageshack.us/img697/8739/offof14thave8.jpg (broken link)


(The other 2 images are too large to post)

http://img263.imageshack.us/img263/3604/bonast.jpg (broken link)

http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/6302/coolidgebona.jpg (broken link)

This is just in residential neighborhoods... East and North Oakland are also surrounded by the hills.
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Old 06-14-2010, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
787 posts, read 1,666,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chava61 View Post
Although NYC is not as spread out as L.A., it does have hilly areas.

And what people in Los Angeles call "hills"....people in NYC would call mountains ("over the hill" from the Valley to the Westside of LA is essentially crossing over a mountain range).
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