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Old 07-18-2010, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
211 posts, read 134,864 times
Reputation: 188

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It's not that bad here. I spent two years in Seattle and hated driving there. There is only one major freeway that runs north/south through the city. That's nuts. People were too polite and not aggressive enough. Thus, it took forever to get anywhere. People spent all their time letting each other go first, which is a bad way to drive with a million other people.

Here, people can be aggressive, but once you know how it works, it's not that difficult or stressful (except bumper to bumper wasted time). We don't leave a lot of room between vehicles. If you attempt to do that, people will cut in and you will slow your entire lane. Most people signal, but they tend to come right over immediately afterward, so the signal is more a command of "make room" than an inquiry. Go the speed of the surrounding cars, even if it is substantially above the speed limit. If everyone is going 80 in the left lane, it works fine. If you want to go slow, get in the right lanes.

I do not understand why the freeways would feel claustrophobic. Most of them are huge. Claustrophobia to me was those floating freeways in Seattle where you are literally on the water. That was an odd feeling.
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Old 07-18-2010, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
425 posts, read 1,039,774 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodsart View Post
It's not that bad here. I spent two years in Seattle and hated driving there. There is only one major freeway that runs north/south through the city. That's nuts. People were too polite and not aggressive enough. Thus, it took forever to get anywhere. People spent all their time letting each other go first, which is a bad way to drive with a million other people.

Here, people can be aggressive, but once you know how it works, it's not that difficult or stressful (except bumper to bumper wasted time). We don't leave a lot of room between vehicles. If you attempt to do that, people will cut in and you will slow your entire lane. Most people signal, but they tend to come right over immediately afterward, so the signal is more a command of "make room" than an inquiry. Go the speed of the surrounding cars, even if it is substantially above the speed limit. If everyone is going 80 in the left lane, it works fine. If you want to go slow, get in the right lanes.

I do not understand why the freeways would feel claustrophobic. Most of them are huge. Claustrophobia to me was those floating freeways in Seattle where you are literally on the water. That was an odd feeling.
The old parts of the 110 feel very claustrophobic. And honestly, in my experience, depending on the freeway and the condition of the traffic jam, people DO leave quite a bit of space between them and the car in front of them, but that is when it's moving, but slow. I notice this the most on the 110 and sometimes the 101 and the 10. Yeah, some people will get in front of you, but you brake less and that isn't so hard on your brakes.
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Old 07-18-2010, 06:27 PM
 
Location: So Ca
5,552 posts, read 5,324,787 times
Reputation: 4209
Quote:
Originally Posted by ca_north View Post
...what percentage of L.A. (region) drivers find a way take it in stride vs. the white-knuckled ones?
I don't think anyone who's lived in L.A. for very long would survive as a white-knuckled driver. Most of us who've been here for any length of time know every freeway exit on our commute, when to enter and exit carpool lanes, when to avoid which freeways, and at what time and which surface streets are faster than freeways. Otherwise we'd go nuts.

One of my relatives who was born and raised here but relcoated to the midwest came to visit recently and drove from Newport Beach to Pasadena on a Friday afternoon. It took her 2 1/2 hours. She said that if she'd been at home, she could have driven through 3 states in that amount of time. We all laughed and said that no one drives the 405 or the 5 north on a Friday afternoon if they want to stay sane.
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Old 07-18-2010, 06:50 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
211 posts, read 134,864 times
Reputation: 188
Quote:
Originally Posted by ladoll View Post
The old parts of the 110 feel very claustrophobic. And honestly, in my experience, depending on the freeway and the condition of the traffic jam, people DO leave quite a bit of space between them and the car in front of them, but that is when it's moving, but slow. I notice this the most on the 110 and sometimes the 101 and the 10. Yeah, some people will get in front of you, but you brake less and that isn't so hard on your brakes.
I can see parts of certain freeways, I suppose. I may have a different idea of claustrophobia, too. I've lived in mountain communities off and on for a long time, where we have two-lane highways that have curves and often have drop-offs. The speed limit is 55 mph and if you know how to drive mountain roads, it is easy to do that speed. And it also gets crowded with tourists, so you have to pass in the oncoming lane when you can. So when I get on these relatively big, flat freeways, I feel like there is a ton of room.

In terms of space, I don't mean that people are riding each other's bumper, but some of the native drivers in Seattle area considered anything less than five or six comfortable car lengths (that is, enough room for a car not to be up another car's behind) to be crowding them. In SoCal, most of the time that space would fill up with at least two cars in moderate traffic. Obviously, you don't want to have zero braking space, but unless there is very little traffic, it's unrealistic to have huge spaces between people even when moving because people will just keep going into that space. That's been my experience, at any rate.
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Old 07-19-2010, 12:25 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles
6 posts, read 6,367 times
Reputation: 13
O yeah, Its horrible. Driving to the down town town from North Hollywood would take you more than a hour.!!!!!
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Old 07-19-2010, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Los Angeles, CA
425 posts, read 1,039,774 times
Reputation: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by woodsart View Post
I can see parts of certain freeways, I suppose. I may have a different idea of claustrophobia, too. I've lived in mountain communities off and on for a long time, where we have two-lane highways that have curves and often have drop-offs. The speed limit is 55 mph and if you know how to drive mountain roads, it is easy to do that speed. And it also gets crowded with tourists, so you have to pass in the oncoming lane when you can. So when I get on these relatively big, flat freeways, I feel like there is a ton of room.

In terms of space, I don't mean that people are riding each other's bumper, but some of the native drivers in Seattle area considered anything less than five or six comfortable car lengths (that is, enough room for a car not to be up another car's behind) to be crowding them. In SoCal, most of the time that space would fill up with at least two cars in moderate traffic. Obviously, you don't want to have zero braking space, but unless there is very little traffic, it's unrealistic to have huge spaces between people even when moving because people will just keep going into that space. That's been my experience, at any rate.
The old part of the 110, while not on a mountain, is very curvy. I would probably be one of the people you pass on the mountain road! LOL I tend to take it kind of slow when there's a chance of me going over the edge. (My car, despite being a coupe, doesn't seem to handle curves as well as I would like.)

I only see the large amounts of space during a traffic jam, but it's usually a car length to a car length and a half. Going beyond that is a bit crazy.
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Old 07-19-2010, 04:57 PM
 
Location: The best state - California
97 posts, read 152,040 times
Reputation: 44
I feel just like you OP. I'm always on high alert when driving these freeways b/c the inconsiderate jerks who are speeding don't care about other people's lives. I count several near misses every single day and I stay praying while I'm driving. It's scary and your description is very accurate. Especially the elevated freeways - I hate those.
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