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Old 06-26-2017, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
7,855 posts, read 6,808,966 times
Reputation: 6573

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevdawgg View Post
It's the kind of "nice to visit, wouldn't live there" type of places. That region might be fun to visit in the summer, but the weather is unbearable from October/November to March/April.
Actually October/November are very nice. There typically isn't snow until December (a day or two). Temps in November are in the 50s. It's really not bad.

Now what makes Boston unbearable is the people.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:07 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
216 posts, read 116,065 times
Reputation: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I think the real issue with LA being "fake" is that it triggers the Uncanny Valley effect (see below) of cities. East Coast cities in old states, like New York, Baltimore, or Philadelphia are exactly what most Americans imagine a "real" city to look like: high-density, streets on a widespread grid, people walking around, weathered tall buildings, historic Beaux Arts train stations, apathy to strange behaviors, and a large blue-collar population. All that, despite a strong car culture and attraction to suburbia in most places. Even touristy cities like Key West or New Orleans are seen as "real", due to the traits described above, as well as their long history.

Las Vegas, by contrast, occupies the opposite end of the real/fake spectrum. It's so fake beyond fake, that people simply write it off as "Vegas, baby!", and not give its un-city-like character much thought. They just accept its fakeness for what it is, although they may hate on its overuse of water in the desert and obsession with money.

But LA is a gray area. On one hand, it's a city, per the Webster's definition: a collection of people and buildings in close quarters, run by a mayor. On the other hand, where are the pedestrians? Where are the historic narrow streets? Where are the centuries-old buildings? Where's the grit and grime? (Outside of Skid Row, that is.) Where are the blue collar workers sitting down for lunch in front of their warehouse? Where are the rumbling trains? Where's the weird guy smoking on the fire escape in his underwear? Lack of those things reminds people of bland suburbia, rather than a "real" city that LA is supposed to be. That cognitive dissonance can easily get strong enough to trigger the Uncanny Valley effect.

I suppose Phoenix, AZ would be expected to trigger the same Uncanny Valley effect, given its similarity to LA in this regard. But this isn't the Phoenix forum.

_______
"Uncanny Valley" is a negative reactions to living things that are almost human, but aren't. Healthy people or beings that clearly aren't human (animals or robots) do not trigger the Uncanny Valley effect. It's the reason why realistic prosthetics that don't move like a healthy limb (close to human, but isn't) can make people uncomfortable, but metal or robotic prosthetic limbs (obviously not human) usually evoke a more neutral reaction or even mild curiosity. And obviously, a natural limb looks perfectly normal.
Your definition of a city in the 21st Century sounds more like grandma's house, everything old and a bit smelly. That's not LA.

When envisioning LA think of fresh, modern architecture, bright colors, eco-friendly, out-door entertainment venues (Griffith Park Observatory, Runyan Park, Exposition Park, etc.) side walk cafe's, a modern transit system (4 light rail lines and 2 subway lines), beautiful and artsy subway stations, countless concert venues (The Hollywood Bowl, The Greek Theater, Nokia, The Wiltern, The Music Center, Fords Theater, Disney Concert Hall,etc), museums ( The Broad, The Getty, MOCA, Grammy, Skirball Cultural Center, Contemporary Art, Norton Simon, Page Museum at La Brea Tar Pits, etc)

LA is many things to many people, one might even call it a beach city. The cities you mentioned, New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, are all located next to a body of water, but none offers it's citizens the pleasures and entertainment like the Pacific ocean. Thousands upon thousands, from every walk of life, flock to our beaches for R&R and entertainment. And not just during the summer months, but year round.

Like any city back east, we too have a vibrant and exciting downtown. In 2014 GQ Magazine wrote an article titled "America's Next Great City is inside LA." That's just one of several articles written about what's happening in downtown LA. The NY Times has covered it extensively.

We may not meet your definition of a city but lets face it, your view is very old school and passe. In LA we don't look to the past, we look to the future.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:32 PM
 
818 posts, read 472,221 times
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Las Vegas is absolutely nothing like Los Angeles. It is supposed to be fake, it's a place to whirlwind away for a weekend of entertainment and then come-back to reality. Las Vegas is a city where an acre is multi millions of dollars on the strip, yet one block off is a worthless dirt field. They prey on people flying in with no transportation that are stuck on the strip.

Los Angeles is a real city, it's just newer than the east-coast so has a different vibe. I mean look at Dubai, It was built-in just the last couple of decades, and it's not like it's amazingly newer than a lot of American cities. But because it was just built it looks very different from even our newer cities
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,002 posts, read 1,256,327 times
Reputation: 3664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in L.A. View Post
Your definition of a city in the 21st Century sounds more like grandma's house, everything old and a bit smelly. That's not LA.
...
We may not meet your definition of a city but lets face it, your view is very old school and passe. In LA we don't look to the past, we look to the future.
I guess that's a way to put it. I'm sure it explains why I really liked New York, LA's arch-nemesis (said with tongue in cheek). I take it I won't find four-story walk-ups with wrought-iron fire escapes hanging on the front if I go to LA again.
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:04 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
216 posts, read 116,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I guess that's a way to put it. I'm sure it explains why I really liked New York, LA's arch-nemesis (said with tongue in cheek). I take it I won't find four-story walk-ups with wrought-iron fire escapes hanging on the front if I go to LA again.
LA isn't trying to compete with New York. The only time I here that kind of talk it's coming from a New Yorker. Most Angelino's don't care much what anyone says about our city. We're use to the idea of everyone hating on LA. And no one hates us more than San Francisco and San Diego. We take great pride in knowing that we're probably the most hated city in America, with Las Vegas a close second.............LOL. Having said that, the International Business Times listed NY City, Orlando, Los Angeles, and Las Vegas, as the most visited US cities by international travelers.
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
216 posts, read 116,065 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I guess that's a way to put it. I'm sure it explains why I really liked New York, LA's arch-nemesis (said with tongue in cheek). I take it I won't find four-story walk-ups with wrought-iron fire escapes hanging on the front if I go to LA again.
You'll see plenty of 100 year old buildings with wrought-iron fire escapes in downtown LA's Old Bank District. The buildings and streets of the Old Bank District are very often used as backdrop for Hollywood movies which depict 1920's to 40's New York City. Fourth Street and Main is one of their favorite places to shoot old New York. They'll even roll in old NYPD cars and NY City buses.
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,002 posts, read 1,256,327 times
Reputation: 3664
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in L.A. View Post
LA isn't trying to compete with New York. The only time I here that kind of talk it's coming from a New Yorker.
I'm not a New Yorker---hey, I never fold my pizza slice ---but I do have to side with them on city preferences. And I did say "tongue in cheek"; I never insinuated that LA competes with New York.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in L.A. View Post
You'll see plenty of 100 year old buildings with wrought-iron fire escapes in downtown LA's Old Bank District. The buildings and streets of the Old Bank District are very often used as backdrop for Hollywood movies which depict 1920's to 40's New York City. Fourth Street and Main is one of their favorite places to shoot old New York. They'll even roll in old NYPD cars and NY City buses.
Interesting. Never knew that.
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Old 06-27-2017, 07:24 PM
 
Location: Baltimore
682 posts, read 680,760 times
Reputation: 547
Quote:
Originally Posted by Happy in L.A. View Post
LA is many things to many people, one might even call it a beach city. The cities you mentioned, New York, Baltimore, Philadelphia, are all located next to a body of water, but none offers it's citizens the pleasures and entertainment like the Pacific ocean. Thousands upon thousands, from every walk of life, flock to our beaches for R&R and entertainment. And not just during the summer months, but year round.

Like any city back east, we too have a vibrant and exciting downtown.
Well to be fair the most major mid-Atlantic cities are mostly river cities and not ocean cities. Alternatively, you have the Hamptons, Ocean City, MD, Virginia Beach and Atlantic City as beach destinations on the Atlantic Ocean. Baltimore capitalize on its waterfront the most in the mid-Atlantic imo. We also have 4 distinct seasons no one is thinking about water other than the Polar Bear Plunge in the winter, but if we had southern California weather more people would be out and about year round here too.
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
216 posts, read 116,065 times
Reputation: 204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northernest Southernest C View Post
Well to be fair the most major mid-Atlantic cities are mostly river cities and not ocean cities. Alternatively, you have the Hamptons, Ocean City, MD, Virginia Beach and Atlantic City as beach destinations on the Atlantic Ocean. Baltimore capitalize on its waterfront the most in the mid-Atlantic imo. We also have 4 distinct seasons no one is thinking about water other than the Polar Bear Plunge in the winter, but if we had southern California weather more people would be out and about year round here too.
I won't dispute that. Weather certainly plays a part. I've actually walked along the Atlantic City Boardwalk and absolutely loved it !!! The Atlantic Ocean was just gleaming on that early evening walk. As far as beach towns, I was referring to the big cities mentioned in the posters comments. Having lived in Washington DC for 4 years I visited Baltimore several times and enjoyed the waterfront development. But I don't recall any beaches in Baltimore.

I've only seen the Hamptons on TV, and it is absolutely beautiful. We have beach towns like that up and down the California Coast. From Corona Del Mar to Santa Barbara, and Pismo Beach to Monterey.

Outside the big cites of the east coast there are some very beautiful beach communities. I've been to New York's Fired Island and Cherry Grove. During the summer months, it doesn't get much better than that. It's a great escape from the hustle and bustle of NYC.

In LA and San Diego, the populace enjoy their beaches year round. In LA we have the famous Venice Beach Boardwalk which travels along the Pacific Ocean for several miles of walking and biking.
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Old 06-28-2017, 02:25 AM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
924 posts, read 904,310 times
Reputation: 730
"Fake people" in Los Angeles is the dumbest, most removed from reality narrative I've ever heard for any city, anywhere. If anything, its the exact opposite-people are far more down to earth and "normal" than one would expect in an Alpha world city.

Much, much more applicable to San Diego.

I went to L.A. yesterday to see the new skyscraper and to work out in West Hollywood. Everyone was so nice and went out of their way to make conversation that went well beyond stupid small talk.
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